Results for 'Engineering ethics'

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  1.  58
    Future Directions in Engineering Ethics Research: Microethics, Macroethics and the Role of Professional Societies.Joseph R. Herkert - 2001 - Science and Engineering Ethics 7 (3):403-414.
    Three frames of reference for engineering ethics are discussed—individual, professional and social—which can be further broken down into “microethics” concerned with individuals and the internal relations of the engineering profession and “macroethics” referring to the collective social responsibility of the engineering profession and to societal decisions about technology. Few attempts have been made at integrating microethical and macroethical approaches to engineering ethics. The approach suggested here is to focus on the role of professional (...) societies in linking individual and professional ethics and in linking professional and social ethics. A research program is outlined using ethics support as an example of the former, and the issuance of position statements on product liability as an example of the latter. (shrink)
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  2. Professional Virtue and Professional Self-Awareness: A Case Study in Engineering Ethics.Preston Stovall - 2011 - Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (1):109-132.
    This paper articulates an Aristotelian theory of professional virtue and provides an application of that theory to the subject of engineering ethics. The leading idea is that Aristotle’s analysis of the definitive function of human beings, and of the virtues humans require to fulfill that function, can serve as a model for an analysis of the definitive function or social role of a profession and thus of the virtues professionals must exhibit to fulfill that role. Special attention is (...)
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  3.  21
    Understanding Ill-Structured Engineering Ethics Problems Through a Collaborative Learning and Argument Visualization Approach.Michael Hoffmann & Jason Borenstein - 2014 - Science and Engineering Ethics 20 (1):261-276.
    As a committee of the National Academy of Engineering recognized, ethics education should foster the ability of students to analyze complex decision situations and ill-structured problems. Building on the NAE’s insights, we report about an innovative teaching approach that has two main features: first, it places the emphasis on deliberation and on self-directed, problem-based learning in small groups of students; and second, it focuses on understanding ill-structured problems. The first innovation is motivated by an abundance of scholarly research (...)
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  4.  45
    A Systematic Approach to Engineering Ethics Education.Jessica Li & Shengli Fu - 2012 - Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (2):339-349.
    Engineering ethics education is a complex field characterized by dynamic topics and diverse students, which results in significant challenges for engineering ethics educators. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a systematic approach to determine what to teach and how to teach in an ethics curriculum. This is a topic that has not been adequately addressed in the engineering ethics literature. This systematic approach provides a method to: (1) develop a context-specific (...) ethics curriculum using the Delphi technique, a process-driven research method; and (2) identify appropriate delivery strategies and instructional strategies using an instructional design model. This approach considers the context-specific needs of different engineering disciplines in ethics education and leverages the collaboration of engineering professors, practicing engineers, engineering graduate students, ethics scholars, and instructional design experts. The proposed approach is most suitable for a department, a discipline/field or a professional society. The approach helps to enhance learning outcomes and to facilitate ethics education curriculum development as part of the regular engineering curriculum. (shrink)
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  5. Engineering Ethics Beyond Engineers' Ethics.Josep M. Basart & Montse Serra - 2013 - Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (1):179-187.
    Engineering ethics is usually focused on engineers’ ethics, engineers acting as individuals. Certainly, these professionals play a central role in the matter, but engineers are not a singularity inside engineering ; they exist and operate as a part of a complex network of mutual relationships between many other people, organizations and groups. When engineering ethics and engineers’ ethics are taken as one and the same thing the paradigm of the ethical engineer which prevails (...)
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  6.  25
    Hidden in Plain View: Feminists Doing Engineering Ethics, Engineers Doing Feminist Ethics[REVIEW]Donna Riley - 2013 - Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (1):189-206.
    How has engineering ethics addressed gender concerns to date? How have the ideas of feminist philosophers and feminist ethicists made their way into engineering ethics? What might an explicitly feminist engineering ethics look like? This paper reviews some major themes in feminist ethics and then considers three areas in which these themes have been taken up in engineering ethics to date. First, Caroline Whitbeck’s work in engineering ethics integrates considerations (...)
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  7.  37
    Can Instruction in Engineering Ethics Change Students' Feelings About Professional Responsibility?Golnaz Hashemian & Michael C. Loui - 2010 - Science and Engineering Ethics 16 (1):201-215.
    How can a course on engineering ethics affect an undergraduate student’s feelings of responsibility about moral problems? In this study, three groups of students were interviewed: six students who had completed a specific course on engineering ethics, six who had registered for the course but had not yet started it, and six who had not taken or registered for the course. Students were asked what they would do as the central character, an engineer, in each of (...)
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  8.  21
    Comparison of Cross Culture Engineering Ethics Training Using the Simulator for Engineering Ethics Education.Christopher Chung - 2015 - Science and Engineering Ethics 21 (2):471-478.
    This paper describes the use and analysis of the Simulator for Engineering Ethics Education to perform cross culture engineering ethics training and analysis. Details describing the first generation and second generation development of the SEEE are published in Chung and Alfred, Science and Engineering Ethics, vol. 15, 2009 and Alfred and Chung, Science and Engineering Ethics, vol. 18, 2012. In this effort, a group of far eastern educated students operated the simulator in (...)
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  9.  82
    “Mind the Gaps”: An Empirical Approach to Engineering Ethics, 1997–2001. [REVIEW]Robert E. McGinn - 2003 - Science and Engineering Ethics 9 (4):517-542.
    A survey on ethical issues in engineering was administered over a five-year period to Stanford engineering students and practicing engineers. Analysis of its results strongly suggests that important disconnects exist between the education of engineering students regarding ethical issues in engineering on the one hand, and the realities of contemporary engineering practice on the other. Two noteworthy consequences of these gaps are that the views of engineering students differ substantially over what makes an issue (...)
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  10.  49
    Changing the Paradigm for Engineering Ethics.Jon Alan Schmidt - 2014 - Science and Engineering Ethics 20 (4):985-1010.
    Modern philosophy recognizes two major ethical theories: deontology, which encourages adherence to rules and fulfillment of duties or obligations; and consequentialism, which evaluates morally significant actions strictly on the basis of their actual or anticipated outcomes. Both involve the systematic application of universal abstract principles, reflecting the culturally dominant paradigm of technical rationality. Professional societies promulgate codes of ethics with which engineers are expected to comply, while courts and the public generally assign liability to engineers primarily in accordance with (...)
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  11.  13
    Comparison of China-US Engineering Ethics Educations in Sino-Western Philosophies of Technology.Gui Hong Cao - 2015 - Science and Engineering Ethics 21 (6):1609-1635.
    Ethics education has become essential in modern engineering. Ethics education in engineering has been increasingly implemented worldwide. It can improve ethical behaviors in technology and engineering design under the guidance of the philosophy of technology. Hence, this study aims to compare China-US engineering ethics education in Sino-Western philosophies of technology by using literature studies, online surveys, observational researches, textual analyses, and comparative methods. In my original theoretical framework and model of input and output (...)
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  12. Should Engineering Ethics Be Taught?Charles J. Abaté - 2011 - Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (3):583-596.
    Should engineering ethics be taught? Despite the obvious truism that we all want our students to be moral engineers who practice virtuous professional behavior, I argue, in this article that the question itself obscures several ambiguities that prompt preliminary resolution. Upon clarification of these ambiguities, and an attempt to delineate key issues that make the question a philosophically interesting one, I conclude that engineering ethics not only should not, but cannot, be taught if we understand “teaching (...)
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  13.  39
    Teaching Engineering Ethics to Undergraduates: Why? What? How? [REVIEW]Michael J. Rabins - 1998 - Science and Engineering Ethics 4 (3):291-302.
    The teaching of engineering ethics is on the increase at universities around the United States. The motivation for this increase (WHY?) has several driving forces, including: a new Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) accreditation criteria; new questions on Professional Engineering (PE) licensing examinations; new industrial marketplace needs; and a growing awareness in the engineering profession of a need for ethical sensitivity to the consequences of our actions as engineers. The subject (WHAT?) is likely (...)
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  14. An Historical Preface to Engineering Ethics.Michael Davis - 1995 - Science and Engineering Ethics 1 (1):33-48.
    This article attempts to distinguish between science and technology, on the one hand, and engineering, on the other, offering a brief introduction to engineering values and engineering ethics. The method is (roughly) a philosophical examination of history. Engineering turns out to be a relatively recent enterprise, barely three hundred years old, to have distinctive commitments both technical and moral, and to have changed a good deal both technically and morally during that period. What motivates the (...)
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  15.  22
    Gaming, Texting, Learning? Teaching Engineering Ethics Through Students' Lived Experiences With Technology.Georgina Voss - 2013 - Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):1375-1393.
    This paper examines how young peoples’ lived experiences with personal technologies can be used to teach engineering ethics in a way which facilitates greater engagement with the subject. Engineering ethics can be challenging to teach: as a form of practical ethics, it is framed around future workplace experience in a professional setting which students are assumed to have no prior experience of. Yet the current generations of engineering students, who have been described as ‘digital (...)
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  16.  42
    Design, Development, and Evaluation of an Interactive Simulator for Engineering Ethics Education (Seee).Christopher A. Chung & Michael Alfred - 2009 - Science and Engineering Ethics 15 (2):189-199.
    Societal pressures, accreditation organizations, and licensing agencies are emphasizing the importance of ethics in the engineering curriculum. Traditionally, this subject has been taught using dogma, heuristics, and case study approaches. Most recently a number of organizations have sought to increase the utility of these approaches by utilizing the Internet. Resources from these organizations include on-line courses and tests, videos, and DVDs. While these individual approaches provide a foundation on which to base engineering ethics, they may be (...)
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  17.  34
    A Team-Taught Interdisciplinary Approach to Engineering Ethics.Glenn C. Graber & Christopher D. Pionke - 2006 - Science and Engineering Ethics 12 (2):313-320.
    This paper outlines the development and implementation of a new course in Engineering Ethics at the University of Tennessee. This is a three-semester-hour course and is jointly taught by an engineering professor and a philosophy professor. While traditional pedagogical techniques such as case studies, position papers, and classroom discussions are used, additional activities such as developing a code of ethics and student-developed scenarios are employed to encourage critical thinking. Among the topics addressed in the course are (...)
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  18.  8
    Beyond Ethical Frameworks: Using Moral Experimentation in the Engineering Ethics Classroom.Olivia Walling - 2015 - Science and Engineering Ethics 21 (6):1637-1656.
    Although undergraduate engineering ethics courses often include the development of moral sensitivity as a learning objective and the use of active learning techniques, teaching centers on the transmission of cognitive knowledge. This article describes a complementary assignment asking students to perform an ethics “experiment” on themselves that has a potential to enhance affective learning and moral imagination. The article argues that the focus on cognitive learning may not promote, and may even impair, our efforts to foster moral (...)
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  19.  33
    Using the Chernobyl Incident to Teach Engineering Ethics.William R. Wilson - 2013 - Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (2):625-640.
    This paper discusses using the Chernobyl Incident as a case study in engineering ethics instruction. Groups of students are asked to take on the role of a faction involved in the Chernobyl disaster and to defend their decisions in a mock debate. The results of student surveys and the Engineering and Science Issues Test indicate that the approach is very popular with students and has a positive impact on moral reasoning. The approach incorporates technical, communication and teamwork (...)
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  20.  20
    Collaborative Learning in Engineering Ethics.Joseph R. Herkert - 1997 - Science and Engineering Ethics 3 (4):447-462.
    This paper discusses collaborative learning and its use in an elective course on ethics in engineering. Collaborative learning is a form of active learning in which students learn with and from one another in small groups. The benefits of collaborative learning include improved student performance and enthusiasm for learning, development of communication skills, and greater student appreciation of the importance of judgment and collaboration in solving real-world problems such as those encountered in engineering ethics. Collaborative learning (...)
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  21.  33
    Design, Development, and Evaluation of a Second Generation Interactive Simulator for Engineering Ethics Education (SEEE2).Michael Alfred & Christopher A. Chung - 2012 - Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (4):689-697.
    This paper describes a second generation Simulator for Engineering Ethics Education. Details describing the first generation activities of this overall effort are published in Chung and Alfred (Sci Eng Ethics 15:189–199, 2009). The second generation research effort represents a major development in the interactive simulator educational approach. As with the first generation effort, the simulator places students in first person perspective scenarios involving different types of ethical situations. Students must still gather data, assess the situation, and make (...)
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  22.  27
    Acclimating International Graduate Students to Professional Engineering Ethics.Katherine Austin Byron Newberry, Greta Gorsuch William Lawson & Thomas Darwin - 2011 - Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (1):171-194.
    This article describes the education portion of an ongoing grant-sponsored education and research project designed to help graduate students in all engineering disciplines learn about the basic ethical principles, rules, and obligations associated with engineering practice in the United States. While the curriculum developed for this project is used for both domestic and international students, the educational materials were designed to be sensitive to the specific needs of international graduate students. In recent years, engineering programs in the (...)
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  23.  31
    Virtue as the Basis of Engineering Ethics.Douglas J. Crawford-Brown - 1997 - Science and Engineering Ethics 3 (4):481-489.
    This paper explores the nature of virtue theory as applied to engineering practice. It links virtue to specific areas of practice such as the selection of ends, devotion to service, the formation of justified belief, the conduct of dialogue, the taking of actions, and exercises of the will. These areas are related to a culture of virtue in which an engineering society creates the conditions enabling acts of virtue and celebrates individuals and their acts which exemplify identified virtues. (...)
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  24.  31
    Engineering the Just War: Examination of an Approach to Teaching Engineering Ethics.David R. Haws - 2006 - Science and Engineering Ethics 12 (2):365-372.
    The efficiency of engineering applied to civilian projects sometimes threatens to run away with the social agenda, but in military applications, engineering often adds a devastating sleekness to the inevitable destruction of life. The relative crudeness of terrorism (e.g., 9/11) leaves a stark after-image, which belies the comparative insignificance of random (as opposed to orchestrated) belligerence. Just as engineering dwarfs the bricolage of vernacular design—moving us past the appreciation of brush-strokes, so to speak—the scale of engineered destruction (...)
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  25.  13
    Teaching Engineering Ethics Using Role-Playing in a Culturally Diverse Student Group.Professor Robert H. Prince - 2006 - Science and Engineering Ethics 12 (2):321-326.
    The use of role-playing (“active learning”) as a teaching tool has been reported in areas as diverse as social psychology, history and analytical chemistry. Its use as a tool in the teaching of engineering ethics and professionalism is also not new, but the approach develops new perspectives when used in a college class of exceptionally wide cultural diversity. York University is a large urban university (40,000 undergraduates) that draws its enrolment primarily from the Greater Toronto Area, arguably one (...)
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  26.  33
    Teaching Engineering Ethics by Conceptual Design: The Somatic Marker Hypothesis.Brad J. Kallenberg - 2009 - Science and Engineering Ethics 15 (4):563-576.
    In 1998, a lead researcher at a Midwestern university submitted as his own a document that had 64 instances of strings of 10 or more words that were identical to a consultant’s masters thesis and replicated a data chart, all of whose 16 entries were identical to three and four significant figures. He was fired because his actions were wrong. Curiously, he was completely unable to see that his actions were wrong. This phenomenon is discussed in light of recent advances (...)
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  27.  28
    Assessing Graduate Student Progress in Engineering Ethics.Michael Davis & Alan Feinerman - 2012 - Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (2):351-367.
    Under a grant from the National Science Foundation, the authors (and others) undertook to integrate ethics into graduate engineering classes at three universities—and to assess success in a way allowing comparison across classes (and institutions). This paper describes the attempt to carry out that assessment. Standard methods of assessment turned out to demand too much class time. Under pressure from instructors, the authors developed an alternative method that is both specific in content to individual classes and allows comparison (...)
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  28.  12
    Teaching Engineering Ethics Using BLOCKS Game.Shiew Wei Lau, Terence Peng Lian Tan & Suk Meng Goh - 2013 - Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):1357-1373.
    The aim of this study was to investigate the use of a newly developed design game called BLOCKS to stimulate awareness of ethical responsibilities amongst engineering students. The design game was played by seventeen teams of chemical engineering students, with each team having to arrange pieces of colored paper to produce two letters each. Before the end of the game, additional constraints were introduced to the teams such that they faced similar ambiguity in the technical facts that the (...)
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  29.  53
    The Professional Approach to Engineering Ethics: Five Research Questions.Michael Davis - 2001 - Science and Engineering Ethics 7 (3):379-390.
    This paper argues that research for engineering ethics should routinely involve philosophers, social scientists, and engineers, and should focus for now on certain basic questions such as: Who is an engineer? What is engineering? What do engineers do? How do they make decisions? And how much control do they actually have over what they do?
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  30.  50
    Engineering Ethics and Identity: Emerging Initiatives in Comparative Perspective. [REVIEW]Gary Lee Downey, Juan C. Lucena & Carl Mitcham - 2007 - Science and Engineering Ethics 13 (4):463-487.
    This article describes and accounts for variable interests in engineering ethics in France, Germany, and Japan by locating recent initiatives in relation to the evolving identities of engineers. A key issue in ethics education for engineers concerns the relationship between the identity of the engineer and the responsibilities of engineering work. This relationship has varied significantly over time and from place to place around the world. One methodological strategy for sorting out similarities and differences in engineers’ (...)
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  31.  27
    Engineering Ethics in Puerto Rico: Issues and Narratives.William J. Frey & Efraín O’Neill-Carrillo - 2008 - Science and Engineering Ethics 14 (3):417-431.
    This essay discusses engineering ethics in Puerto Rico by examining the impact of the Colegio de Ingenieros y Agrimensores de Puerto Rico (CIAPR) and by outlining the constellation of problems and issues identified in workshops and retreats held with Puerto Rican engineers. Three cases developed and discussed in these workshops will help outline movements in engineering ethics beyond the compliance perspective of the CIAPR. These include the Town Z case, Copper Mining in Puerto Rico, and a (...)
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  32.  36
    Engineering Ethics: Looking Back, Looking Forward.Richard A. Burgess, Michael Davis, Marilyn A. Dyrud, Joseph R. Herkert, Rachelle D. Hollander, Lisa Newton, Michael S. Pritchard & P. Aarne Vesilind - 2013 - Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):1395-1404.
    The eight pieces constituting this Meeting Report are summaries of presentations made during a panel session at the 2011 Association for Practical and Professional Ethics (APPE) annual meeting held between March 3rd and 6th in Cincinnati. Lisa Newton organized the session and served as chair. The panel of eight consisted both of pioneers in the field and more recent arrivals. It covered a range of topics from how the field has developed to where it should be going, from identification (...)
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  33.  63
    What’s Philosophically Interesting About Engineering Ethics?Michael Davis - 2003 - Science and Engineering Ethics 9 (3):353-361.
    What makes a subject philosophically interesting is hard-to-resolve confusion about fundamental concepts. Engineering ethics suffers from at least three such fundamental confusions. First, there is confusion about what the “ethics” in engineering ethics is (ordinary morality, philosophical ethics, special standards, or something else?) Second, there is confusion about what the profession of engineering is (a function, discipline, occupation, kind of organization, or something else?) Third, there is confusion about what the discipline of (...) is. These fundamental confusions in engineering ethics connect with philosophically interesting work in moral theory, political philosophy, and philosophy of science. Work in these areas may help with the philosophical problems of engineering ethics. But, equally important, work in engineering ethics may help with the philosophical problems in these others fields. (shrink)
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  34.  32
    Teaching for Adaptive Expertise in Biomedical Engineering Ethics.Taylor Martin, Karen Rayne, Nate J. Kemp, Jack Hart & Kenneth R. Diller - 2005 - Science and Engineering Ethics 11 (2):257-276.
    This paper considers an approach to teaching ethics in bioengineering based on the How People Learn (HPL) framework. Curricula based on this framework have been effective in mathematics and science instruction from the kindergarten to the college levels. This framework is well suited to teaching bioengineering ethics because it helps learners develop “adaptive expertise”. Adaptive expertise refers to the ability to use knowledge and experience in a domain to learn in unanticipated situations. It differs from routine expertise, which (...)
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  35.  39
    Holistic Engineering Ethics?Eddie Conlon, Diana Adela Martin & Brian Bowe - 2018 - Proceedings of the Engineering Education for Sustainable Development Conference.
    This paper focuses on the question of What kind of engineering ethics (EE) is needed to develop holistic engineers who can practice and promote the principles of sustainable development? -/- It is argued that, given the existence of other models, an approach to EE, as argued for at EESD 2016, centred on “training engineers for handling ethical dilemmas in sustainability contexts” (Lundqvist and Svanstrom 2016) is inadequate to address the sustainability challenge facing engineers.. We contend that while EE (...)
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  36.  22
    Bhopal and Engineering Ethics in Advance.Christopher Pariso - forthcoming - Business and Professional Ethics Journal.
    In this paper, I will provide a picture of the Bhopal disaster from an engineering ethics perspective. I find that the individual engineers involved in Bhopal acted ethically, for the most part, but that these actions failed to prevent the disaster for structural reasons. Nonetheless, there is no single level of analysis at which the problems that caused the Bhopal incident can be solved. Rather, a coordinated attempt must be made to change how individual engineers conceive of their (...)
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  37.  24
    The Dilemma of Ethics in Engineering Education.ron Newberry - 2004 - Science and Engineering Ethics 10 (2):343-351.
    This paper briefly summarizes current thinking in engineering ethics education, argues that much of that ethical instruction runs the risk of being only superficially effective, and explores some of the underlying systemic barriers within academia that contribute to this result. This is not to criticize or discourage efforts to improve ethics instruction. Rather it is to point to some more fundamental problems that still must be addressed in order to realize the full potential of enhanced ethics (...)
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  38. Personal Meaning and Ethics in Engineering.Mike W. Martin - 2002 - Science and Engineering Ethics 8 (4):545-560.
    The study of engineering ethics tends to emphasize professional codes of ethics and, to lesser degrees, business ethics and technology studies. These are all important vantage points, but they neglect personal moral commitments, as well as personal aesthetic, religious, and other values that are not mandatory for all members of engineering. This paper illustrates how personal moral commitments motivate, guide, and give meaning to the work of engineers, contributing to both self-fulfillment and public goods. It (...)
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  39. Engineering Ethics on Fukushima.Yusuke Kaneko - 2013 - International Journal of Humanities and Social Science 3 (3).
    In this paper, we discuss the problems of Tohoku earthquake in terms of engineering ethics. But as“engineers,”we also count seismologists. This is because, simply thinking, the recent disaster is partially attributable to seismologists. Through the discussion, including an overview of the earthquake, we reach the conclusion endorsing the abolition of nuclear power plants.
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  40. Introduction to Engineering Ethics.Roland Schinzinger - 2000 - Mcgraw Hill.
    Introduction to Engineering Ethics provides the background for discussion of the basic issues in engineering ethics. Emphasis is given to the moral problems engineers face in the corporate setting. It places those issues within a philosophical framework, and it seems to exhibit both their social importance and their intellectual challenge. The primary goal is to stimulate critical and responsible reflection on moral issues surrounding engineering practice and to provide the conceptual tools necessary for pursuing those (...)
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  41.  59
    Philosophy of Technology and Macro-Ethics in Engineering.Wha-Chul Son - 2008 - Science and Engineering Ethics 14 (3):405-415.
    The purpose of this paper is to diagnose and analyze the gap between philosophy of technology and engineering ethics and to suggest bridging them in a constructive way. In the first section, I will analyze why philosophy of technology and engineering ethics have taken separate paths so far. The following section will deal with the so-called macro-approach in engineering ethics. While appreciating the initiative, I will argue that there are still certain aspects in this (...)
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  42.  25
    Engineering Ethics for a Globalized World.C. Murphy, P. Gardoni, H. Bashir, C. E. Harris Jr, & E. Masad (eds.) - 2015 - Dordrecht: Springer International Publishing.
    This volume identifies, discusses and addresses the wide array of ethical issues that have emerged for engineers due to the rise of a global economy. To date, there has been no systematic treatment of the particular challenges globalization poses for engineering ethics standards and education. This volume concentrates on precisely this challenge. Scholars and practitioners from diverse national and professional backgrounds discuss the ethical issues emerging from the inherent symbiotic relationship between the engineering profession and globalization. Through (...)
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  43.  67
    Teaching Ethics in Engineering Education Through Historical Analysis.David P. Billington - 2006 - Science and Engineering Ethics 12 (2):205-222.
    The goal of this paper is to stress the significance of ethics for engineering education and to illustrate how it can be brought into the mainstream of higher education in a natural way that is integrated with the teaching objectives of enriching the core meaning of engineering. Everyone will agree that the practicing engineer should be virtuous, should be a good colleague, and should use professional understanding for the common good. But these injunctions to virtue do not (...)
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  44.  11
    A Constructivist Approach to the Use of Case Studies in Teaching Engineering Ethics.Diana Adela Martin, Eddie Conlon & Brian Bowe - 2017 - Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing 715:193-201.
    Our paper aims to explore the effectiveness of a constructivist approach to the teaching of engineering ethics through case studies, by putting forward a contextualization of the much discussed case study “Cutting Road Side Trees” [12] in light of the constructivist frame suggested by Jonassen [8]. First, we briefly analyse how the use of case studies for the teaching of engineering ethics eludes the complexity of the engineering professional environment before arguing that constructivism is a (...)
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  45.  35
    Web-Based Education in Science and Engineering Ethics — Topic and Technology Barriers.Missy Cummings - 2005 - Science and Engineering Ethics 11 (3):386-388.
  46. Virtue Ethics, Positive Psychology, and a New Model of Science and Engineering Ethics Education.Hyemin Han - 2015 - Science and Engineering Ethics 21 (2):441-460.
    This essay develops a new conceptual framework of science and engineering ethics education based on virtue ethics and positive psychology. Virtue ethicists and positive psychologists have argued that current rule-based moral philosophy, psychology, and education cannot effectively promote students’ moral motivation for actual moral behavior and may even lead to negative outcomes, such as moral schizophrenia. They have suggested that their own theoretical framework of virtue ethics and positive psychology can contribute to the effective promotion of (...)
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  47.  35
    An Effective Strategy for Integrating Ethics Across the Curriculum in Engineering: An ABET 2000 Challenge.José A. Cruz & William J. Frey - 2003 - Science and Engineering Ethics 9 (4):543-568.
    This paper describes a one-day workshop format for introducing ethics into the engineering curriculum prepared at the University of Puerto Rico at Mayagüez (UPRM). It responds to the ethics criteria newly integrated into the accreditation process by the Accreditation Board of Engineering and Technology (ABET). It also employs an ethics across the curriculum (EAC) approach; engineers identify the ethical issues, write cases that dramatize these issues, and then develop exercises making use of these cases that (...)
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  48.  40
    Engineering, Ethics, and the Environment.P. Aarne Vesilind - 1998 - Cambridge University Press.
    Engineering is 'the people-serving profession'. The work of engineers involves interaction with clients, other engineers, and the public at large. More than any other profession, their work also directly involves and affects the environment. This book makes the case that engineers have special professional obligations to protect and enhance the environment, and the authors - one, an engineer and the other, a philosopher - seek to provide an ethical basis for these obligations. In exploring these ethical issues, the authors (...)
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  49.  53
    Teaching Ethics to Engineers: Ethical Decision Making Parallels the Engineering Design Process.Bridget Bero & Alana Kuhlman - 2011 - Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (3):597-605.
    In order to fulfill ABET requirements, Northern Arizona University’s Civil and Environmental engineering programs incorporate professional ethics in several of its engineering courses. This paper discusses an ethics module in a 3rd year engineering design course that focuses on the design process and technical writing. Engineering students early in their student careers generally possess good black/white critical thinking skills on technical issues. Engineering design is the first time students are exposed to “grey” or (...)
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    Engineering Codes of Ethics and the Duty to Set a Moral Precedent.Eugene Schlossberger - 2016 - Science and Engineering Ethics 22 (5):1333-1344.
    Each of the major engineering societies has its own code of ethics. Seven “common core” clauses and several code-specific clauses can be identified. The paper articulates objections to and rationales for two clauses that raise controversy: do engineers have a duty to provide pro bono services and/or speak out on major issues, and to associate only with reputable individuals and organizations? This latter “association clause” can be justified by the “proclamative principle,” an alternative to Kant’s universalizability requirement. At (...)
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