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  1.  10
    Callimaco, Fr. 114 Pf., il "Somnium" ed il "Prologo" Degli 'Aitia'.Enrico Livrea - 1995 - Hermes 123 (1):47-62.
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  2.  10
    From Pittacus to Byzantium: The History of a Callimachean Epigram.Enrico Livrea - 1995 - Classical Quarterly 45 (2):474-480.
    Callimachus,ep. 1 Pfeiffer relates an anecdote about Pittacus: when consulted by a stranger from Atarneus who was wondering whether to marry a woman of his own social class or one of a higher status, he suggests the question is answered by the cries of the children playing with tops, τν κατ cαντν ἔλα. The chequered history of the transmission and interpretation of the poem is beset by a number of unfavourable or patronizing judgements which, I hope to show, have their (...)
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  3.  8
    P. Oxy. 2463: Lycophron and Callimachus.Enrico Livrea - 1989 - Classical Quarterly 39 (01):141-.
    The present paper concludes that P. Oxy. 2463 contains remnants of a commentary on the Aitia of Callimachus. Identifying the commentary makes it possible to reconstruct the missing part of Heracles' conversation with Molorchus , confirming its place in the Victoria Berenices and settling the latter's relationship to the Aitia. The argument takes its departure from a vexed passage in Lycophron.
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  4.  3
    P. Oxy. 2463: Lycophron and Callimachus.Enrico Livrea - 1989 - Classical Quarterly 39 (1):141-147.
    The present paper concludes that P. Oxy. 2463 contains remnants of a commentary on the Aitia of Callimachus. Identifying the commentary makes it possible to reconstruct the missing part of Heracles' conversation with Molorchus, confirming its place in the Victoria Berenices and settling the latter's relationship to the Aitia. The argument takes its departure from a vexed passage in Lycophron.
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  5.  11
    The Tempest in Callimachus' Hecale.Enrico Livrea - 1992 - Classical Quarterly 42 (01):147-.
    After slipping away from Athens about evening , Theseus on his journey to Marathon runs into a violent rainstorm, which breaks out suddenly after a warm and brilliant afternoon, so that he has to take refuge in Hecale's poor cottage. We owe to P. Oxy. 2216 fr. 1 as well as to some Testimonia the following text of the tempest, fr. 238.15–32 Pfeiffer = 18 Hollis.
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  6.  14
    A New Pythagorean Fragment and Homer's Tears in Ennius.Enrico Livrea - 1998 - Classical Quarterly 48 (02):559-561.
    Although we do not know the philosophical source these scholia derive from , there can hardly be any doubt that we have here a new Pythagorean fragment which communicates basic notions about metempsychosis. Pythagoras is criticized for representing the soul as afflicted by pain and grief when it leaves the body before entering a new one. The reasons given for its distress need not detain us here, but this new Pythagorean fragment clearly offers a conclusive solution to the vexed question (...)
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  7.  6
    L'epitafio Callimacheo Per Batto.Enrico Livrea - 1992 - Hermes 120 (3):291-298.
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  8.  6
    Nonnus and the Orphic Argonautica.Enrico Livrea - 2014 - In Konstantinos Spanoudakis (ed.), Nonnus of Panopolis in Context: Poetry and Cultural Milieu in Late Antiquity with a Section on Nonnus and the Modern World. De Gruyter. pp. 55-76.
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  9.  5
    From Pittacus to Byzantium: The History of a Callimachean Epigram.Enrico Livrea - 1995 - Classical Quarterly 45 (02):474-.
    Callimachus,ep. 1 Pfeiffer relates an anecdote about Pittacus: when consulted by a stranger from Atarneus who was wondering whether to marry a woman of his own social class or one of a higher status, he suggests the question is answered by the cries of the children playing with tops, τν κατ cαντν ἔλα. The chequered history of the transmission and interpretation of the poem is beset by a number of unfavourable or patronizing judgements which, I hope to show, have their (...)
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  10.  5
    Tre Epigrammi Funerari Callimachei.Enrico Livrea - 1990 - Hermes 118 (3):314-324.
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