8 found
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  1.  25
    Why We Hate.Agneta Fischer, Eran Halperin, Daphna Canetti & Alba Jasini - 2018 - Emotion Review 10 (4):309-320.
    We offer a functional perspective on hate, showing that hate has a unique pattern of appraisals and action tendencies. Hate is based on perceptions of a stable, negative disposition of persons or groups. We hate persons and groups more because of who they are, than because of what they do. Hate has the goal to eliminate its target. Hate is especially significant at the intergroup level, where it turns already devalued groups into victims of hate. When shared among group members, (...)
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  2.  30
    Successful Emotion Regulation Requires Both Conviction and Skill: Beliefs About the Controllability of Emotions, Reappraisal, and Regulation Success.Tony Gutentag, Eran Halperin, Roni Porat, Yochanan E. Bigman & Maya Tamir - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (6):1225-1233.
    To succeed in self-regulation, people need to believe that it is possible to change behaviour and they also need to use effective means to enable such a change. We propose that this also applies to emotion regulation. In two studies, we found that people were most successful in emotion regulation, the more they believed emotions can be controlled and the more they used an effective emotion regulation strategy – namely, cognitive reappraisal. Cognitive reappraisal moderated the link between beliefs about the (...)
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  3.  15
    Together We Cry: Social Motives and Preferences for Group-Based Sadness.Roni Porat, Eran Halperin, Ittay Mannheim & Maya Tamir - 2016 - Cognition and Emotion 30 (1):66-79.
  4.  15
    Emotion Regulation in Violent Conflict: Reappraisal, Hope, and Support for Humanitarian Aid to the Opponent in Wartime.Eran Halperin & James J. Gross - 2011 - Cognition and Emotion 25 (7):1228-1236.
  5.  8
    Emotions in Attacker-Defender Conflicts.Patricia Cernadas Curotto, Eran Halperin, David Sander & Olga Klimecki - 2019 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 42.
    The distinction between attackers and defenders might help refine the understanding of the role of emotions in conflicts. Here, we briefly discuss differences between attackers and defenders in terms of appraisals, action tendencies, emotional preferences, and brain activities. Finally, we outline how attackers and defenders may differ in their response to emotion-based interventions that aim to promote conflict resolution.
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  6.  10
    Beyond Emotional Similarity: The Role of Situation-Specific Motives.Amit Goldenberg, David Garcia, Eran Halperin, Jamil Zaki, Danyang Kong, Golijeh Golarai & James J. Gross - 2020 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 149 (1):138-159.
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  7.  15
    Disappointment Expression Evokes Collective Guilt and Collective Action in Intergroup Conflict: The Moderating Role of Legitimacy Perceptions.Nevin Solak, Michal Reifen Tagar, Smadar Cohen-Chen, Tamar Saguy & Eran Halperin - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (6):1112-1126.
    Research on intergroup emotions has largely focused on the experience of emotions and surprisingly little attention has been given to the expression of emotions. Drawing on the social-functional approach to emotions, we argue that in the context of intergroup conflicts, outgroup members’ expression of disappointment with one’s ingroup induces the complementary emotion of collective guilt and correspondingly a collective action protesting ingroup actions against the outgroup. In Study 1 conducted immediately after the 2014 Gaza war, Jewish-Israeli participants received information about (...)
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  8.  7
    Motivated Emotion and the Rally Around the Flag Effect: Liberals Are Motivated to Feel Collective Angst When Faced with Existential Threat.Roni Porat, Maya Tamir, Michael J. A. Wohl, Tamar Gur & Eran Halperin - 2018 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (3):480-491.
    ABSTRACTA careful look at societies facing threat reveals a unique phenomenon in which liberals and conservatives react emotionally and attitudinally in a similar manner, rallying around the conservative flag. Previous research suggests that this rally effect is the result of liberals shifting in their attitudes and emotional responses toward the conservative end. Whereas theories of motivated social cognition provide a motivation-based account of cognitive processes, it remains unclear whether emotional shifts are, in fact, also a motivation-based process. Herein, we propose (...)
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