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  1. On Creaturely Life: Rilke, Benjamin, Sebald.Eric L. Santner - 2007 - Ars Disputandi 7:1566-5399.
    In his _Duino Elegies,_ Rainer Maria Rilke suggests that animals enjoy direct access to a realm of being—the open—concealed from humans by the workings of consciousness and self-consciousness. In his own reading of Rilke, Martin Heidegger reclaims the open as the proper domain of human existence but suggests that human life remains haunted by vestiges of an animal-like relation to its surroundings. Walter Benjamin, in turn, was to show that such vestiges—what Eric Santner calls the _creaturely_—have a biopolitical aspect: they (...)
     
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  2.  4
    The Royal Remains: The People's Two Bodies and the Endgames of Sovereignty.Eric L. Santner - 2011 - University of Chicago Press.
  3.  8
    On the Psychotheology of Everyday Life: Reflections on Freud and Rosenzweig.Eric L. Santner - 2001 - University of Chicago Press.
    In On the Psychotheology of Everyday Life, Eric Santner puts Sigmund Freud in dialogue with his contemporary Franz Rosenzweig in the service of reimagining ethical and political life.
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  4. The Neighbor: Three Inquiries in Political Theology.Slavoj Zizek, Eric L. Santner & Kenneth Reinhard - 2006 - University of Chicago Press.
    In _Civilization and Its Discontents_, Freud made abundantly clear what he thought about the biblical injunction, first articulated in Leviticus 19:18 and then elaborated in Christian teachings, to love one's neighbor as oneself. "Let us adopt a naive attitude towards it," he proposed, "as though we were hearing it for the first time; we shall be unable then to suppress a feeling of surprise and bewilderment." After the horrors of World War II, the Holocaust, Stalinism, and Yugoslavia, Leviticus 19:18 seems (...)
     
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  5. On Creaturely Life: Rilke, Benjamin, Sebald.Eric L. Santner - 2006 - University of Chicago Press.
    In his _Duino Elegies,_ Rainer Maria Rilke suggests that animals enjoy direct access to a realm of being—the open—concealed from humans by the workings of consciousness and self-consciousness. In his own reading of Rilke, Martin Heidegger reclaims the open as the proper domain of human existence but suggests that human life remains haunted by vestiges of an animal-like relation to its surroundings. Walter Benjamin, in turn, was to show that such vestiges—what Eric Santner calls the _creaturely_—have a biopolitical aspect: they (...)
     
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  6.  38
    On the Psychotheology of Everyday Life: Reflections on Freud and Rosenzweig.Stuart J. Murray & Eric L. Santner - 2003 - Substance 32 (1):158.
  7.  21
    The Royal Remains: Carl Schmitt's Hamlet or Hecuba.Eric L. Santner - 2010 - Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 2010 (153):30-50.
    ExcerptI.In her study of the role of theater and popular entertainments in the dissemination of the doctrine of the “king's two bodies” in the second half of the sixteenth century, Marie Axton emphasizes that this period was one of high anxiety with respect not only to the problem of royal succession but more generally to “the very principles by which government and authority are perpetuated.”1 The legal and political problem of succession was, of course, especially acute because of Elizabeth's status (...)
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  8.  3
    Holderlin in an Expanded Field.Eric L. Santner - 1993 - Philosophy Today 37 (4):402-410.
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  9. The Neighbor: Three Inquiries in Political Theology, with a New Preface.Slavoj Zizek, Eric L. Santner & Kenneth Reinhard - 2013 - University of Chicago Press.
    In _Civilization and Its Discontents_, Freud made abundantly clear what he thought about the biblical injunction, first articulated in Leviticus 19:18 and then elaborated in Christian teachings, to love one's neighbor as oneself. “Let us adopt a naive attitude towards it,” he proposed, “as though we were hearing it for the first time; we shall be unable then to suppress a feeling of surprise and bewilderment.” After the horrors of World War II, the Holocaust, and Stalinism, Leviticus 19:18 seems even (...)
     
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