Results for 'Eric Sievers'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  19
    Antecedent rationalization: Rationalization prior to action.Eric Thomas Sievers - 2020 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 43.
    Often times we find ourselves wrestling with the urge to commit a non-rational action. When this happens, we are quite good at adopting quasi-beliefs that, if true, would make the action rational. In other words, rationalization often occurs antecedent to a behavioral choice. A complete account of the evolutionary history of rationalization must include antecedent rationalization.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Cause and burn.David Rose, Eric Sievers & Shaun Nichols - 2021 - Cognition 207 (104517):104517.
    Many philosophers maintain that causation is to be explicated in terms of a kind of dependence between cause and effect. These “dependence” theories are opposed by “production” accounts which hold that there is some more fundamental causal “oomph”. A wide range of experimental research on everyday causal judgments seems to indicate that ordinary people operate primarily with a dependence-based notion of causation. For example, people tend to say that absences and double preventers are causes. We argue that the impression that (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  3. Cause, "Cause", and Norm.John Schwenkler & Eric Sievers - 2022 - In Pascale Willemsen & Alex Wiegmann (eds.), Advances in Experimental Philosophy of Causation. Bloomsbury Publishing. pp. 123-144.
    This chapter presents a series of experiments that elicit causal judgments using statements that do not include the verb "to cause". In particular, our interest is in exploring the extent to which previously observed effects of normative considerations on agreement with what we call "cause"-statements, i.e. those of the form "X caused ..." extend as well to those of the form "X V-ed Y", where V is a lexical causative. Our principal finding is that in many cases the effects do (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  4.  9
    Reliability in Pragmatics.Eric McCready - 2014 - Oxford University Press.
    This book considers how observations about the past influence future behaviour, as expressed in language. Focusing on information gathered from speech and other evidence sources, the author offers a model of how judgements about reliability can be made, and how such judgements factor into how people treat information they acquire via those sources.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  5.  60
    Consciousness and Persons: Unity and Identity, MICHAEL TYE. Cambridge, MA, and London, UK.Eric T. Olson - 2006 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 73 (2):500-503.
    There is much to admire in this book. It is written in a pleasingly straightforward style, and offers insight on a wide range of important issues.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   101 citations  
  6.  68
    From “Personalized” to “Precision” Medicine: The Ethical and Social Implications of Rhetorical Reform in Genomic Medicine.Eric Juengst, Michelle L. McGowan, Jennifer R. Fishman & Richard A. Settersten - 2016 - Hastings Center Report 46 (5):21-33.
    Since the late 1980s, the human genetics and genomics research community has been promising to usher in a “new paradigm for health care”—one that uses molecular profiling to identify human genetic variants implicated in multifactorial health risks. After the completion of the Human Genome Project in 2003, a wide range of stakeholders became committed to this “paradigm shift,” creating a confluence of investment, advocacy, and enthusiasm that bears all the marks of a “scientific/intellectual social movement” within biomedicine. Proponents of this (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  7.  55
    Prediction and the periodic table.Eric R. Scerri & John Worrall - 2001 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 32 (3):407-452.
    The debate about the relative epistemic weights carried in favour of a theory by predictions of new phenomena as opposed to accommodations of already known phenomena has a long history. We readdress the issue through a detailed re-examination of a particular historical case that has often been discussed in connection with it—that of Mendeleev and the prediction by his periodic law of the three ‘new’ elements, gallium, scandium and germanium. We find little support for the standard story that these predictive (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   63 citations  
  8. The natural right of property.Eric Mack - 2010 - Social Philosophy and Policy 27 (1):53-78.
    The two main theses of are: (i) that persons possess an original, non-acquired right not to be precluded from making extra-personal material their own (or from exercising discretionary control over what they have made their own); and (ii) that this right can and does take the form of a right that others abide by the rules of a (justifiable) practice of property which facilitates persons making extra-personal material their own (and exercising discretionary control over what they have made their own). (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   30 citations  
  9. Composition and coincidence.Eric T. Olson - 1996 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 77 (4):374-403.
    Many philosophers say that the same atoms may compose at once a statue and a lump of matter that could outlive the statue. I reject this because no difference between the statue and the lump could explain why they have different persistence conditions. But if we say that the lump is the statue, it is difficult to see how there could be any human beings. I argue that this and analogous problems about material objects admit only of solutions that at (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  10.  14
    The New Science of Politics.Eric Voegelin - 1953 - Philosophical Review 62 (4):608-609.
  11.  39
    Logic and Visual Information.Eric Hammer - 1995 - CSLI Publications.
    This book examines the logical foundations of visual information: information presented in the form of diagrams, graphs, charts, tables, and maps. The importance of visual information is clear from its frequent presence in everyday reasoning and communication, and also in compution. Chapters of the book develop the logics of familiar systems of diagrams such as Venn diagrams and Euler circles. Other chapters develop the logic of higraphs, Pierce diagrams, and a system having both diagrams and sentences among its well-formed representations. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  12. Thinking Animals and the Reference of ‘I’.Eric T. Olson - 2002 - Philosophical Topics 30 (1):189-207.
    In this essay I explore the idea that the solution to some important problems of personal identity lies in the philosophy of language: more precisely in the nature of first-person reference. I will argue that the “linguistic solution” is at best partly successful.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   31 citations  
  13.  34
    Towards a logic for ‘because’.Eric Raidl & Hans Rott - forthcoming - Philosophical Studies:1-31.
    This paper explores the connective ‘because’, based on the idea that ‘CbecauseA’ implies the acceptance/truth of the antecedentAas well as of the consequentC, and additionally that the antecedent makes a difference for the consequent. To capture this idea of difference-making a ‘relevantized’ version of the Ramsey Test for conditionals is employed that takes the antecedent to be relevant to the consequent in the following sense: a conditional is true/accepted in a state$$\sigma $$σjust in case (i) the consequent is true/accepted when$$\sigma (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  14.  83
    Further Adventures in the Case against Restoration.Eric Katz - 2012 - Environmental Ethics 34 (1):67-97.
    Ecological restoration has been a topic for philosophical criticism for three decades. In this essay, I present a discussion of the arguments against ecological restoration and the objections raised against my position. I have two purposes in mind: to defend my views against my critics, and to demonstrate that the debate over restoration reveals fundamental ideas about the meaning of nature, ideas that are necessary for the existence of any substantive environmentalism. I discuss the possibility of positive restorations, the idea (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  15. Evidentiality, modality and probability.Eric McCready & Norry Ogata - 2007 - Linguistics and Philosophy 30 (2):147 - 206.
    We show in this paper that some expressions indicating source of evidence are part of propositional content and are best analyzed as special kind of epistemic modal. Our evidence comes from the Japanese evidential system. We consider six evidentials in Japanese, showing that they can be embedded in conditionals and under modals and that their properties with respect to modal subordination are similar to those of ordinary modals. We show that these facts are difficult for existing theories of evidentials, which (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
  16.  18
    Equal Justice.Eric Rakowski - 1991 - Oxford, GB: Oxford University Press.
    This book sets forth a novel theory of distributive justice premised on the fundamental moral equality of persons. It argues that, subject to certain limitations on personal sacrifice, no one should have less valuable resources and opportunities available to him than anyone else, simply invirtue of some chance occurrence the risk of which he did not choose to incur. Applying this principle to the distribution of wealth and income, the specification of property rights, and the allocation of scarce medical resources, (...)
  17. Preface.Eric Beerbohm - 2012 - In Eric Anthony Beerbohm (ed.), In our name: the ethics of democracy. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
  18.  11
    Politics and the Order of Love: An Augustinian Ethic of Democratic Citizenship.Eric Gregory - 2008 - University of Chicago Press.
    Augustine—for all of his influence on Western culture and politics—was hardly a liberal. Drawing from theology, feminist theory, and political philosophy, Eric Gregory offers here a liberal ethics of citizenship, one less susceptible to anti-liberal critics because it is informed by the Augustinian tradition. The result is a book that expands Augustinian imaginations for liberalism and liberal imaginations for Augustinianism. Gregory examines a broad range of Augustine’s texts and their reception in different disciplines and identifies two classical themes which (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  19.  32
    CSR and the Mediated Emergence of Strategic Ambiguity.Eric Guthey & Mette Morsing - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 120 (4):555-569.
    We develop a framework for understanding how lack of clarity in business press coverage of corporate social responsibility functions as a mediated and emergent form of strategic ambiguity. Many stakeholders expect CSR to exhibit clarity, consistency, and discursive closure. But stakeholders also expect CSR to conform to varying degrees of both formal and substantive rationality. These diverse expectations conflict with each other and change over time. A content analysis of press coverage in Denmark suggests that the business media reflect and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  20.  94
    Imaginative Resistance and Variation.Eric Peterson - 2019 - British Journal of Aesthetics 59 (1):67-80.
    Imaginative resistance is roughly a phenomenon that is characterized by either an inability or an unwillingness to imagine some proposition. It has been noted that this phenomenon varies from person to person and from context to context. Most philosophers account for this variation by appealing to contextual factor. While such accounts make progress, I argue that the variation outruns the use of such a tactic. I propose a new account that can explain all of the variation.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  21.  40
    Learning Matters: The Role of Learning in Concept Acquisition.Stephen Laurence Eric Margolis - 2011 - Mind and Language 26 (5):507-539.
    In LOT 2: The Language of Thought Revisited, Jerry Fodor argues that concept learning of any kind—even for complex concepts—is simply impossible. In order to avoid the conclusion that all concepts, primitive and complex, are innate, he argues that concept acquisition depends on purely noncognitive biological processes. In this paper, we show (1) that Fodor fails to establish that concept learning is impossible, (2) that his own biological account of concept acquisition is unworkable, and (3) that there are in fact (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  22. Thinking machines.Eric Drexler - 1986 - In Engines of Creation. Fourth Estate.
  23. The electronic configuration model, quantum mechanics and reduction.Eric R. Scerri - 1991 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 42 (3):309-325.
    The historical development of the electronic configuration model is traced and the status of the model with respect to quantum mechanics is examined. The successes and problems raised by the model are explored, particularly in chemical ab initio calculations. The relevance of these issues to whether chemistry has been reduced to quantum mechanics is discussed, as are some general notions on reduction.
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   26 citations  
  24.  26
    Self-ownership, Marxism, and Egalitarianism: Part I: Challenges to Historical Entitlement.Eric Mack - 2002 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 1 (1):75-108.
    This two-part article offers a defense of a libertarian doctrine that centers on two propositions. The first is the self-ownership thesis according to which each individual possesses original moral rights over her own body, faculties, talents, and energies. The second is the anti-egalitarian conclusion that, through the exercise of these rights of self-ownership, individuals may readily become entitled to substantially unequal extra-personal holdings. The self-ownership thesis remains in the background during Part I of this essay, while the anti-egalitarian conclusion is (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  25.  34
    Newton's Metaphysics: Essays.Eric Schliesser - 2021 - Oxford University Press.
    In this collection of new and previously published essays, noted philosopher Eric Schliesser offers new interpretations of the signifance of Isaac Newton's metaphysics on his physics and the subsequent development of philosophy more broadly. In particular, he explores the rich resonances between Newton's and Spinoza's metaphysics. The volume includes a substantive introduction, new chapters on Newton's modal metaphysics and his theology, and two postscripts in whichSchliesser responds to some of his most important critics, including Katherine Brading, Andrew Janiak, Hylarie (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  26. Incommensurability, realism, and meta-incommensurability.Eric Oberheim & Paul Hoyningen-Huene - 1997 - Theoria 12 (3):447-465.
    The essay begins with a detailed consideration of the introduction of incommensurability by Feyerabend in 1962 which exposes several historically inaccurate claims about incommensurability. Section 2 is a coneise argument against causal theories of reference as used as arguments against incommensurability. We object to this strategy because it begs the question by presupposing realism. Section 3 introduces and discusses a hypothesis that w'e call meta-incommensurability which provides the reason for the wide-spread accusation of question-begging and use of circular argumentation among (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  27.  20
    Realism, Reduction and the “intermediate position”.Eric Scerri - 2000 - In Nalini Bhushan & Stuart M. Rosenfeld (eds.), Of Minds and Molecules: New Philosophical Perspectives on Chemistry. Oxford University Press. pp. 51--72.
  28. The normativity of meaning.Eric H. Gampel - 1997 - Philosophical Studies 86 (3):221-42.
  29.  87
    Health, Luck and Moral Fallacies of the Second Best.Eric Cavallero - 2011 - The Journal of Ethics 15 (4):387-403.
    Individuals who become ill as a result of personal lifestyle choices often shift the monetary costs of their healthcare needs to the taxpaying public or to fellow members of a private insurance pool. Some argue that policies permitting such cost shifting are unfair. Arguments for this view may seem to draw support from luck egalitarian accounts of distributive justice. This essay argues that the luck egalitarian framework provides no such support. To allocate healthcare costs on the basis of personal responsibility (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  30. An immigration-pressure model of global distributive justice.Eric Cavallero - 2006 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 5 (1):97-127.
    International borders concentrate opportunities in some societies while limiting them in others. Borders also prevent those in the less favored societies from gaining access to opportunities available in the more favored ones. Both distributive effects of borders are treated here within a comprehensive framework. I argue that each state should have broad discretion under international law to grant or deny entry to immigration seekers; but more favored countries that find themselves under immigration pressure should be legally obligated to fund development (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  31.  82
    What’s the Harm in Climate Change?Eric S. Godoy - 2017 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 20 (1):103-117.
    A popular argument against direct duties for individuals to address climate change holds that only states and other powerful collective agents must act. It excuses individual actions as harmless since they are neither necessary nor sufficient to cause harm, arise through normal activity, and have no clear victims. Philosophers have challenged one or more of these assumptions; however, I show that this definition of harm also excuses states and other collective agents. I cite two examples of this in public discourse (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  32.  16
    Process models deserve process data: Comment on Brandstätter, Gigerenzer, and Hertwig (2006).Eric J. Johnson, Michael Schulte-Mecklenbeck & Martijn C. Willemsen - 2008 - Psychological Review 115 (1):263-272.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  33.  49
    Why do good hunters have higher reproductive success?Eric Alden Smith - 2004 - Human Nature 15 (4):343-364.
    Anecdotal evidence from many hunter-gatherer societies suggests that successful hunters experience higher prestige and greater reproductive success. Detailed quantitative data on these patterns are now available for five widely dispersed cases (Ache, Hadza, !Kung, Lamalera, and Meriam) and indicate that better hunters exhibit higher age-corrected reproductive success than other men in their social group. Leading explanations to account for this pattern are: (1) direct provisioning of hunters’ wives and offspring, (2) dyadic reciprocity, (3) indirect reciprocity, (4) costly signaling, and (5) (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  34.  45
    The ethics of confucian artistry.Eric C. Mullis - 2007 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 65 (1):99–107.
  35.  42
    Giving up on convergence and autonomy: Why the theories of psychology and neuroscience are codependent as well as irreconcilable.Eric Hochstein - 2016 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 56:135-144.
    There is a long-standing debate in the philosophy of mind and philosophy of science regarding how best to interpret the relationship between neuroscience and psychology. It has traditionally been argued that either the two domains will evolve and change over time until they converge on a single unified account of human behaviour, or else that they will continue to work in isolation given that they identify properties and states that exist autonomously from one another. In this paper, I argue that (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  36.  20
    John Locke.Eric Mack - 2009 - Continuum.
    The second volume in the Major Conservative and Libertarian Thinkers.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  37.  17
    Putting Religion Back Into Religious Ethics.Eric Gregory - 2019 - Journal of Religious Ethics 47 (1):166-179.
    This essay on Richard Miller’s Friends and Other Strangers (2016) locates its arguments in the context of how the practice of religious ethics bears upon debates about normativity in the study of religion and the cultural turn in the humanities. After reviewing its main claims about identity and otherness, I focus on three areas. First, while commending Miller’s effort to analogize virtuous empathy with Augustine’s ethics of rightly ordered love, I raise questions about his use of Augustine and his distinctive (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  38.  61
    Poor writing, not specialized concepts, drives processing difficulty in legal language.Eric Martínez, Francis Mollica & Edward Gibson - 2022 - Cognition 224 (C):105070.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  39.  39
    The Problem of History and the Three Movements of Existence in Patočka on the Basis of an Appropriation of Arendt’s Anthropology.Eric Pommier & D. J. S. Cross - 2020 - Philosophy Today 64 (1):185-203.
    Jan Patočka holds that both the Husserlian and the Heideggerian descriptions of history remain abstract because they lack an authentic reflection on historical sense’s appearing, which presupposes a description of the transition from the nonhistorical and prehistorical states of humanity to its final historical state. Nevertheless, it seems that Patočka would confront an internal aporia here because, even if he sought to think the continuity of these three movements, he tends to affirm the rupture between them. To overcome that aporia, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  40.  87
    Why P rather than q? The curiosities of fact and foil.Eric Barnes - 1994 - Philosophical Studies 73 (1):35 - 53.
    In this paper I develop a theory of contrastive why questions that establishes under what conditions it is sensible to ask "why p rather than q?". p and q must be outcomes of a single type of causal process.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  41.  31
    The Recently Claimed Observation of Atomic Orbitals and Some Related Philosophical Issues.Eric R. Scerri - 2001 - Philosophy of Science 68 (S3):S76-S88.
    The main thrust of the paper involves a theoretical and philosophical analysis of the claim made in September 1999 that atomic orbitals have been directly imaged for the first time. After a brief account of the recent claims the paper reviews the development of the orbit and later orbital concepts and analyzes the theoretical status of atomic orbitals. The conclusion is that contrary to these claims, atomic orbitals have not in fact been observed. The non-referring nature of modern atomic orbitals (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  42. Do We Dream in Color? Cultural Variations and Skepticism.Eric Schwitzgebel - 2006 - Dreaming 16:36-.
  43.  39
    On Philosophical Method.Eric Matthews & Hector-Neri Castaneda - 1982 - Philosophical Quarterly 32 (126):89.
  44.  38
    Porous or Contextualized Autonomy? Knowledge Can Empower Autonomous Moral Agents.Eric Racine & Veljko Dubljević - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (2):48-50.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  45.  10
    Emerson’s abolitionist perfectionism.Eric Ritter - 2021 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (6):860-881.
    Philosophy & Social Criticism, Volume 48, Issue 6, Page 860-881, July 2022. This article aims to rewrite Emerson’s moral perfectionism – his anti-foundationalist pursuit of an always more perfect state of self and society – onto his moral and intellectual participation in the abolitionist movement. I argue that Cavell artificially separated Emerson’s moral perfectionism from his extensive, decades-long abolitionism. The source of Cavell’s oversight is his participation in the long-standing norm of dichotomizing Emerson’s work into the theoretical ‘essays’ and the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  46.  26
    A Defense of the Autonomy of Ethics: Why Value Is Not Like Water.Eric H. Gampel - 1996 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 26 (2):191-209.
    There has recently been a revival of interest in ‘naturalizing’ ethics. A naturalization seeks to vindicate ethical realism — the idea that ethical judgments can be true reflections of a moral reality — without violating the naturalist constraint that science sets the limits of ontology. The recent revival has been prompted by examples of successful scientific reduction (e.g. temperature, water), and by the emergence of new, nonreductive naturalist strategies (e.g. for biological and mental properties). In this paper, I argue against (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  47. A Strong Emergence Hypothesis of Conscious Integration and Neural Rewiring.Eric LaRock, Jeffrey Schwartz, Iliyan Ivanov & David Carreon - 2020 - International Philosophical Quarterly 60 (1):97-115.
    In this paper we discuss the two-system framework, examine its strengths, point out a fundamental weakness concerning the unity of conscious experience, and then propose a new hypothesis that avoids that weakness and other related concerns. According to our strong emergence hypothesis, what emerges are not merely mental properties in specialized, distributed neural areas, but also a new, irreducibly singular entity that functions in a recurrent manner to integrate its mental properties and to rewire its brain. We argue that the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  48. Is there a bodily criterion of personal identity?Eric T. Olson - 2006 - In Fraser MacBride (ed.), Identity and modality. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 242.
    One of the main problems of personal identity is supposed to be how we relate to our bodies. A few philosophers endorse what is called a 'bodily criterion of personal identity': they say that we are our bodies, or at any rate that our identity over time consists in the identity of our bodies. Many more deny this--typically on the grounds that we can imagine ourselves coming apart from our bodies. But both sides agree that the bodily criterion is an (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  49.  91
    No unchallengeable epistemic authority, of any sort, regarding our own conscious experience.Eric Schwitzgebel - 2007 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 6 (1-2):107-113.
    Dennett argues that we can be mistaken about our own conscious experience. Despite this, he repeatedly asserts that we can or do have unchallengeable authority of some sort in our reports about that experience. This assertion takes three forms. First, Dennett compares our authority to the authority of an author over his fictional world. Unfortunately, that appears to involve denying that there are actual facts about experience that subjects may be truly or falsely reporting. Second, Dennett sometimes seems to say (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  50.  14
    Dion’s Foot.Eric T. Olson - 1997 - Journal of Philosophy 94 (5):260.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000