31 found
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  1.  40
    Inferring causal networks from observations and interventions.Mark Steyvers, Joshua B. Tenenbaum, Eric-Jan Wagenmakers & Ben Blum - 2003 - Cognitive Science 27 (3):453-489.
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  2.  33
    A Survey of Model Evaluation Approaches With a Tutorial on Hierarchical Bayesian Methods.Richard M. Shiffrin, Michael D. Lee, Woojae Kim & Eric-Jan Wagenmakers - 2008 - Cognitive Science 32 (8):1248-1284.
    This article reviews current methods for evaluating models in the cognitive sciences, including theoretically based approaches, such as Bayes factors and minimum description length measures; simulation approaches, including model mimicry evaluations; and practical approaches, such as validation and generalization measures. This article argues that, although often useful in specific settings, most of these approaches are limited in their ability to give a general assessment of models. This article argues that hierarchical methods, generally, and hierarchical Bayesian methods, specifically, can provide a (...)
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  3.  10
    On the linear relation between the mean and the standard deviation of a response time distribution.Eric-Jan Wagenmakers & Scott Brown - 2007 - Psychological Review 114 (3):830-841.
  4.  40
    On the ability to inhibit thought and action: General and special theories of an act of control.Gordon D. Logan, Trisha Van Zandt, Frederick Verbruggen & Eric-Jan Wagenmakers - 2014 - Psychological Review 121 (1):66-95.
  5.  31
    Comparison of Decision Learning Models Using the Generalization Criterion Method.Woo-Young Ahn, Jerome R. Busemeyer, Eric-Jan Wagenmakers & Julie C. Stout - 2008 - Cognitive Science 32 (8):1376-1402.
    It is a hallmark of a good model to make accurate a priori predictions to new conditions (Busemeyer & Wang, 2000). This study compared 8 decision learning models with respect to their generalizability. Participants performed 2 tasks (the Iowa Gambling Task and the Soochow Gambling Task), and each model made a priori predictions by estimating the parameters for each participant from 1 task and using those same parameters to predict on the other task. Three methods were used to evaluate the (...)
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  6.  66
    Reciprocal relations between cognitive neuroscience and formal cognitive models: opposites attract?Birte U. Forstmann, Eric-Jan Wagenmakers, Tom Eichele, Scott Brown & John T. Serences - 2011 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 15 (6):272-279.
  7.  18
    Testing adaptive toolbox models: A Bayesian hierarchical approach.Benjamin Scheibehenne, Jörg Rieskamp & Eric-Jan Wagenmakers - 2013 - Psychological Review 120 (1):39-64.
  8.  33
    Meta-analyses are no substitute for registered replications: a skeptical perspective on religious priming.Michiel van Elk, Dora Matzke, Quentin F. Gronau, Maime Guan, Joachim Vandekerckhove & Eric-Jan Wagenmakers - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
  9. A Phase Transition Model for the Speed-Accuracy Trade-Off in Response Time Experiments.Gilles Dutilh, Eric-Jan Wagenmakers, Ingmar Visser & Han L. J. van der Maas - 2011 - Cognitive Science 35 (2):211-250.
    Most models of response time (RT) in elementary cognitive tasks implicitly assume that the speed-accuracy trade-off is continuous: When payoffs or instructions gradually increase the level of speed stress, people are assumed to gradually sacrifice response accuracy in exchange for gradual increases in response speed. This trade-off presumably operates over the entire range from accurate but slow responding to fast but chance-level responding (i.e., guessing). In this article, we challenge the assumption of continuity and propose a phase transition model for (...)
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  10.  8
    Bayesian statistical inference in psychology: Comment on Trafimow (2003).Michael D. Lee & Eric-Jan Wagenmakers - 2005 - Psychological Review 112 (3):662-668.
  11.  37
    Is There a Free Lunch in Inference?Jeffrey N. Rouder, Richard D. Morey, Josine Verhagen, Jordan M. Province & Eric-Jan Wagenmakers - 2016 - Topics in Cognitive Science 8 (3):520-547.
    The field of psychology, including cognitive science, is vexed by a crisis of confidence. Although the causes and solutions are varied, we focus here on a common logical problem in inference. The default mode of inference is significance testing, which has a free lunch property where researchers need not make detailed assumptions about the alternative to test the null hypothesis. We present the argument that there is no free lunch; that is, valid testing requires that researchers test the null against (...)
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  12.  29
    On the automatic link between affect and tendencies to approach and avoid: Chen and Bargh (1999) revisited.Mark Rotteveel, Alexander Gierholz, Gijs Koch, Cherelle van Aalst, Yair Pinto, Dora Matzke, Helen Steingroever, Josine Verhagen, Titia F. Beek, Ravi Selker, Adam Sasiadek & Eric-Jan Wagenmakers - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6:57614.
    Within the literature on emotion and behavioral action, studies on approach-avoidance take up a prominent place. Several experimental paradigms feature successful conceptual replications but many original studies have not yet been replicated directly. We present such a direct replication attempt of two seminal experiments originally conducted by Chen and Bargh (1999). In their first experiment, participants affectively evaluated attitude objects by pulling or pushing a lever. Participants who had to pull the lever with positively valenced attitude objects and push the (...)
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  13.  83
    Abstract Concepts Require Concrete Models: Why Cognitive Scientists Have Not Yet Embraced Nonlinearly Coupled, Dynamical, Self-Organized Critical, Synergistic, Scale-Free, Exquisitely Context-Sensitive, Interaction-Dominant, Multifractal, Interdependent Brain-Body-Niche Systems.Eric-Jan Wagenmakers, Han L. J. van der Maas & Simon Farrell - 2012 - Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (1):87-93.
    After more than 15 years of study, the 1/f noise or complex-systems approach to cognitive science has delivered promises of progress, colorful verbiage, and statistical analyses of phenomena whose relevance for cognition remains unclear. What the complex-systems approach has arguably failed to deliver are concrete insights about how people perceive, think, decide, and act. Without formal models that implement the proposed abstract concepts, the complex-systems approach to cognitive science runs the danger of becoming a philosophical exercise in futility. The complex-systems (...)
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  14.  12
    Flexible yet fair: blinding analyses in experimental psychology.Gilles Dutilh, Alexandra Sarafoglou & Eric-Jan Wagenmakers - 2019 - Synthese 198 (S23):5745-5772.
    The replicability of findings in experimental psychology can be improved by distinguishing sharply between hypothesis-generating research and hypothesis-testing research. This distinction can be achieved by preregistration, a method that has recently attracted widespread attention. Although preregistration is fair in the sense that it inoculates researchers against hindsight bias and confirmation bias, preregistration does not allow researchers to analyze the data flexibly without the analysis being demoted to exploratory. To alleviate this concern we discuss how researchers may conduct blinded analyses. As (...)
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  15.  40
    Turning the hands of time again: a purely confirmatory replication study and a Bayesian analysis.Eric-Jan Wagenmakers, Titia F. Beek, Mark Rotteveel, Alex Gierholz, Dora Matzke, Helen Steingroever, Alexander Ly, Josine Verhagen, Ravi Selker, Adam Sasiadek, Quentin F. Gronau, Jonathon Love & Yair Pinto - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
  16.  28
    An integrated perspective on the relation between response speed and intelligence.Don van Ravenzwaaij, Scott Brown & Eric-Jan Wagenmakers - 2011 - Cognition 119 (3):381-393.
  17.  6
    Time-varying boundaries for diffusion models of decision making and response time.Shunan Zhang, Michael D. Lee, Joachim Vandekerckhove, Gunter Maris & Eric-Jan Wagenmakers - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5:112331.
    Diffusion models are widely-used and successful accounts of the time course of two-choice decision making. Most diffusion models assume constant boundaries, which are the threshold levels of evidence that must be sampled from a stimulus to reach a decision. We summarize theoretical results from statistics that relate distributions of decisions and response times to diffusion models with time-varying boundaries. We then develop a computational method for finding time-varying boundaries from empirical data, and apply our new method to two problems. The (...)
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  18.  4
    Systematic and random sources of variability in perceptual decision-making: Comment on Ratcliff, Voskuilen, and McKoon (2018).Nathan J. Evans, Gabriel Tillman & Eric-Jan Wagenmakers - 2020 - Psychological Review 127 (5):932-944.
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  19.  12
    The Support Interval.Eric-Jan Wagenmakers, Quentin F. Gronau, Fabian Dablander & Alexander Etz - 2020 - Erkenntnis 87 (2):589-601.
    A frequentist confidence interval can be constructed by inverting a hypothesis test, such that the interval contains only parameter values that would not have been rejected by the test. We show how a similar definition can be employed to construct a Bayesian support interval. Consistent with Carnap’s theory of corroboration, the support interval contains only parameter values that receive at least some minimum amount of support from the data. The support interval is not subject to Lindley’s paradox and provides an (...)
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  20.  33
    The Jeffreys–Lindley paradox: an exchange.Alexander Ly, Eric-Jan Wagenmakers, Joshua L. Cherry & Jeremy Gray - 2023 - Archive for History of Exact Sciences 77 (4):443-449.
    This Editorial reports an exchange in form of a comment and reply on the article “History and Nature of the Jeffreys–Lindley Paradox” (Arch Hist Exact Sci 77:25, 2023) by Eric-Jan Wagenmakers and Alexander Ly.
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  21.  43
    Temporal expectation and information processing: A model-based analysis.Marieke Jepma, Eric-Jan Wagenmakers & Sander Nieuwenhuis - 2012 - Cognition 122 (3):426-441.
  22.  10
    Optimal decision making in neural inhibition models.Don van Ravenzwaaij, Han L. J. van der Maas & Eric-Jan Wagenmakers - 2012 - Psychological Review 119 (1):201-215.
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  23.  12
    A Bayesian hierarchical diffusion model decomposition of performance in Approach–Avoidance Tasks.Angelos-Miltiadis Krypotos, Tom Beckers, Merel Kindt & Eric-Jan Wagenmakers - 2015 - Cognition and Emotion 29 (8):1424-1444.
    Common methods for analysing response time (RT) tasks, frequently used across different disciplines of psychology, suffer from a number of limitations such as the failure to directly measure the underlying latent processes of interest and the inability to take into account the uncertainty associated with each individual's point estimate of performance. Here, we discuss a Bayesian hierarchical diffusion model and apply it to RT data. This model allows researchers to decompose performance into meaningful psychological processes and to account optimally for (...)
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  24. Context Effects in Multi-Alternative Decision Making: Empirical Data and a Bayesian Model.Guy Hawkins, Scott D. Brown, Mark Steyvers & Eric-Jan Wagenmakers - 2012 - Cognitive Science 36 (3):498-516.
    For decisions between many alternatives, the benchmark result is Hick's Law: that response time increases log-linearly with the number of choice alternatives. Even when Hick's Law is observed for response times, divergent results have been observed for error rates—sometimes error rates increase with the number of choice alternatives, and sometimes they are constant. We provide evidence from two experiments that error rates are mostly independent of the number of choice alternatives, unless context effects induce participants to trade speed for accuracy (...)
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  25.  7
    What’s in a Name: A Bayesian Hierarchical Analysis of the Name-Letter Effect.Oliver Dyjas, Raoul P. P. P. Grasman, Ruud Wetzels, Han L. J. van der Maas & Eric-Jan Wagenmakers - 2012 - Frontiers in Psychology 3.
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  26.  72
    Mechanistic curiosity will not kill the Bayesian cat.Denny Borsboom, Eric-Jan Wagenmakers & Jan-Willem Romeijn - 2011 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (4):192-193.
    Jones & Love (J&L) suggest that Bayesian approaches to the explanation of human behavior should be constrained by mechanistic theories. We argue that their proposal misconstrues the relation between process models, such as the Bayesian model, and mechanisms. While mechanistic theories can answer specific issues that arise from the study of processes, one cannot expect them to provide constraints in general.
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  27.  3
    The Support Interval.Alexander Etz, Fabian Dablander, Quentin F. Gronau & Eric-Jan Wagenmakers - 2020 - Erkenntnis 87 (2):589-601.
    A frequentist confidence interval can be constructed by inverting a hypothesis test, such that the interval contains only parameter values that would not have been rejected by the test. We show how a similar definition can be employed to construct a Bayesian support interval. Consistent with Carnap’s theory of corroboration, the support interval contains only parameter values that receive at least some minimum amount of support from the data. The support interval is not subject to Lindley’s paradox and provides an (...)
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  28.  12
    Postscript: Bayesian Statistical Inference in Psychology: Comment on Trafimow (2003).Michael D. Lee & Eric-Jan Wagenmakers - 2005 - Psychological Review 112 (3):668-668.
  29.  6
    Performance and awareness in the Iowa Gambling Task.Helen Steingroever & Eric-Jan Wagenmakers - 2014 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 37 (1):41-42.
  30.  3
    History and nature of the Jeffreys–Lindley paradox.Eric-Jan Wagenmakers & Alexander Ly - 2022 - Archive for History of Exact Sciences 77 (1):25-72.
    The Jeffreys–Lindley paradox exposes a rift between Bayesian and frequentist hypothesis testing that strikes at the heart of statistical inference. Contrary to what most current literature suggests, the paradox was central to the Bayesian testing methodology developed by Sir Harold Jeffreys in the late 1930s. Jeffreys showed that the evidence for a point-null hypothesis $${\mathcal {H}}_0$$ H 0 scales with $$\sqrt{n}$$ n and repeatedly argued that it would, therefore, be mistaken to set a threshold for rejecting $${\mathcal {H}}_0$$ H 0 (...)
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  31.  75
    How do individuals reason in the Wason card selection task?Eric-Jan Wagenmakers - 2009 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (1):104-104.
    The probabilistic approach to human reasoning is exemplified by the information gain model for the Wason card selection task. Although the model is elegant and original, several key aspects of the model warrant further discussion, particularly those concerning the scope of the task and the choice process of individuals.
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