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  1.  32
    Deciding for a Child: A Comprehensive Analysis of the Best Interest Standard. [REVIEW]Erica K. Salter - 2012 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 33 (3):179-198.
    This article critically examines, and ultimately rejects, the best interest standard as the predominant, go-to ethical and legal standard of decision making for children. After an introduction to the presumption of parental authority, it characterizes and distinguishes six versions of the best interest standard according to two key dimensions related to the types of interests emphasized. Then the article brings three main criticisms against the best interest standard: (1) that it is ill-defined and inconsistently appealed to and applied, (2) that (...)
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  2.  5
    Conflating Capacity & Authority: Why We're Asking the Wrong Question in the Adolescent Decision‐Making Debate.Erica K. Salter - 2017 - Hastings Center Report 47 (1):32-41.
    Whether adolescents should be allowed to make their own medical decisions has been a topic of discussion in bioethics for at least two decades now. Are adolescents sufficiently capacitated to make their own medical decisions? Is the mature-minor doctrine, an uncommon legal exception to the rule of parental decision-making authority, something we should expand or eliminate? Bioethicists have dealt with the curious liminality of adolescents—their being neither children nor adults—in a variety of ways. However, recently there has been a trend (...)
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  3.  10
    The Re-Contextualization of the Patient: What Home Health Care Can Teach Us About Medical Decision-Making.Erica K. Salter - 2015 - HEC Forum 27 (2):143-156.
    This article examines the role of context in the development and deployment of standards of medical decision-making. First, it demonstrates that bioethics, and our dominant standards of medical decision-making, developed out of a specific historical and philosophical environment that prioritized technology over the person, standardization over particularity, individuality over relationship and rationality over other forms of knowing. These forces de-contextualize the patient and encourage decision-making that conforms to the unnatural and contrived environment of the hospital. The article then explores several (...)
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  4.  2
    Introduction: Childhood and Disability.Erica K. Salter - 2017 - HEC Forum 29 (3):191-196.
    From growth attenuation therapy for severely developmentally disabled children to the post-natal management of infants with trisomy 13 and 18, pediatric treatment decisions regularly involve assessments of the probability and severity of a child’s disability. Because these decisions are almost always made by surrogate decision-makers and because these decision-makers must often make decisions based on both prognostic guesses and potentially biased quality of life judgments, they are among the most ethically complex in pediatric care. As the introduction to HEC Forum’s (...)
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  5.  5
    Introduction: Clinical Ethics Beyond the Urban Hospital.Erica K. Salter & Joseph T. Norris - 2015 - HEC Forum 27 (2):87-91.
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  6.  5
    Should We Tell Annie?: Preparing for Death at the Intersection of Parental Authority and Adolescent Autonomy.Erica K. Salter - 2013 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 3 (1):81-88.
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  7.  1
    Reimagining Childhood: Responding to the Challenge Presented by Severe Developmental Disability.Erica K. Salter - 2017 - HEC Forum 29 (3):241-256.
    Through an exploration of the experience of severe and profound intellectual disability, this essay will attempt to expose the predominant, yet usually obscured, medical anthropology of the child and examine its effects on pediatric bioethics. I will argue that both modern western society and modern western medicine do, actually, have a robust notion of the child, a notion which can find its roots in three influential thinkers: Aristotle, Immanuel Kant and Jean Piaget. Together, these philosophers offer us a compelling vision: (...)
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