19 found
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  1.  44
    Taxonomizing Views of Clinical Ethics Expertise.Erica K. Salter & Abram Brummett - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (11):50-61.
    Our aim in this article is to bring some clarity to the clinical ethics expertise debate by critiquing and replacing the taxonomy offered by the Core Competencies report. The orienting question for our taxonomy is: Can clinical ethicists offer justified, normative recommendations for active patient cases? Views that answer “no” are characterized as a “negative” view of clinical ethics expertise and are further differentiated based on (a) why they think ethicists cannot give justified normative recommendations and (b) what they think (...)
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  2.  23
    Mapping the Moral Terrain of Clinical Deception.Abram Brummett & Erica K. Salter - 2023 - Hastings Center Report 53 (1):17-25.
    Legal precedent, professional‐society statements, and even many medical ethicists agree that some situations may call for a clinician to engage in an act of lying or nonlying deception of a patient or patient's family member. Still, the moral terrain of clinical deception is largely uncharted, and when it comes to practical guidance for clinicians, many might think that ethicists offer nothing more than the rule never to deceive. This guidance is insufficient to meet the real‐world demands of clinical practice, and (...)
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  3.  29
    Dead Enough? NRP-cDCD and Remaining Questions for the Ethics of DCD Protocols.Patrick McCruden, Jason T. Eberl, Erica K. Salter & Kyle Karches - 2023 - American Journal of Bioethics 23 (2):41-43.
    In their article, Nielsen Busch and Mjaaland defend the moral permissibility of cDCD, suggesting that much of the controversy around this donation practice has been the result of a misinterpretatio...
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  4.  36
    Conflating Capacity & Authority: Why We're Asking the Wrong Question in the Adolescent Decision‐Making Debate.Erica K. Salter - 2017 - Hastings Center Report 47 (1):32-41.
    Whether adolescents should be allowed to make their own medical decisions has been a topic of discussion in bioethics for at least two decades now. Are adolescents sufficiently capacitated to make their own medical decisions? Is the mature-minor doctrine, an uncommon legal exception to the rule of parental decision-making authority, something we should expand or eliminate? Bioethicists have dealt with the curious liminality of adolescents—their being neither children nor adults—in a variety of ways. However, recently there has been a trend (...)
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  5.  26
    When First We Practice to Deceive.Jason T. Eberl & Erica K. Salter - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 21 (5):15-17.
    We argue against Christopher Meyers’s call for clinical ethicists to participate in deceiving patients, surrogate decision-makers, or family members. While we acknowledge that some forms of deception may be ethically appropriate in highly circumscribed situations, the type of case Meyers describes as involving justifiable deception differs in at least two important ways. First, Meyers fails to distinguish acts of deception based on the critical feature of who is being deceived—patient, surrogate, or family member—and the overarching duty to respect the autonomy (...)
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  6.  24
    We have nothing left to bury.Abram Brummett, Andrea Thornton, Erica K. Salter & Samuel Deters - 2022 - Hastings Center Report 52 (1):12-14.
    Hastings Center Report, Volume 52, Issue 1, Page 12-14, January/February 2022.
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  7.  4
    The Desire to Die: Making Treatment Decisions for Suicidal Patients Who Have an Advance Directive.Erica K. Salter - 2014 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 25 (1):43-49.
    This article enumerates and critically examines the potential grounds on which we might treat the case of a patient with an advance directive who attempted suicide, differently from one whose injuries were the result of an accident. Grounds for differentiation are distilled into two potential justifications. The first addresses the concern that withholding or withdrawing care from a patient with self-inflicted injuries would be aiding and abetting suicide. The second examines concerns about the patient’s decisionmaking capacity. Ultimately, it is argued (...)
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  8.  13
    Reimagining Childhood: Responding to the Challenge Presented by Severe Developmental Disability.Erica K. Salter - 2017 - HEC Forum 29 (3):241-256.
    Through an exploration of the experience of severe and profound intellectual disability, this essay will attempt to expose the predominant, yet usually obscured, medical anthropology of the child and examine its effects on pediatric bioethics. I will argue that both modern western society and modern western medicine do, actually, have a robust notion of the child, a notion which can find its roots in three influential thinkers: Aristotle, Immanuel Kant and Jean Piaget. Together, these philosophers offer us a compelling vision: (...)
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  9. Deciding for a child: a comprehensive analysis of the best interest standard. [REVIEW]Erica K. Salter - 2012 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 33 (3):179-198.
    This article critically examines, and ultimately rejects, the best interest standard as the predominant, go-to ethical and legal standard of decision making for children. After an introduction to the presumption of parental authority, it characterizes and distinguishes six versions of the best interest standard according to two key dimensions related to the types of interests emphasized. Then the article brings three main criticisms against the best interest standard: (1) that it is ill-defined and inconsistently appealed to and applied, (2) that (...)
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  10.  31
    The Re-contextualization of the Patient: What Home Health Care Can Teach Us About Medical Decision-Making.Erica K. Salter - 2015 - HEC Forum 27 (2):143-156.
    This article examines the role of context in the development and deployment of standards of medical decision-making. First, it demonstrates that bioethics, and our dominant standards of medical decision-making, developed out of a specific historical and philosophical environment that prioritized technology over the person, standardization over particularity, individuality over relationship and rationality over other forms of knowing. These forces de-contextualize the patient and encourage decision-making that conforms to the unnatural and contrived environment of the hospital. The article then explores several (...)
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  11.  15
    Triage Policies at U.S. Hospitals with Pediatric Intensive Care Units.Erica K. Salter, Jay R. Malone, Amanda Berg, Annie B. Friedrich, Alexandra Hucker, Hillary King & Armand H. Matheny Antommaria - 2023 - AJOB Empirical Bioethics 14 (2):84-90.
    Objectives To characterize the prevalence and content of pediatric triage policies.Methods We surveyed and solicited policies from U.S. hospitals with pediatric intensive care units. Policies were analyzed using qualitative methods and coded by 2 investigators.Results Thirty-four of 120 institutions (28%) responded. Twenty-five (74%) were freestanding children’s hospitals and 9 (26%) were hospitals within a hospital. Nine (26%) had approved policies, 9 (26%) had draft policies, 5 (14%) were developing policies, and 7 (20%) did not have policies. Nineteen (68%) institutions shared (...)
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  12.  3
    How We Found Consensus on Pediatric Decision-Making and Why It Matters.Erica K. Salter, Lainie Friedman Ross & D. Micah Hester - 2024 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 67 (2):186-196.
    This article describes the process engaged by 17 expert scholars in the development of a set of six consensus recommendations about the normative foundations of pediatric decision-making. The process began with a robust pre-reading assignment, followed by three days of in-person symposium discussions that resulted in a publication in _Pediatrics_ entitled “Pediatric Decision-Making: Consensus Recommendations” (Salter et al. 2023). This article next compares the six recommendations to existing statements about pediatric decision-making (specifically those developed by the American Academy of Pediatrics), (...)
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  13.  17
    From “How” to “Why”: Reasons for Magnifying and Marginalizing Voices in Pediatric Decision-Making.Erica K. Salter - 2022 - American Journal of Bioethics 22 (6):19-21.
    In “Acquiescence is Not Agreement,” Caruso Brown (2022) offers a comprehensive framework for identifying and empowering marginalized voices in pediatric decision-making. She does so through both a...
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  14.  15
    Introduction: Childhood and Disability.Erica K. Salter - 2017 - HEC Forum 29 (3):191-196.
    From growth attenuation therapy for severely developmentally disabled children to the post-natal management of infants with trisomy 13 and 18, pediatric treatment decisions regularly involve assessments of the probability and severity of a child’s disability. Because these decisions are almost always made by surrogate decision-makers and because these decision-makers must often make decisions based on both prognostic guesses and potentially biased quality of life judgments, they are among the most ethically complex in pediatric care. As the introduction to HEC Forum’s (...)
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  15.  13
    Introduction: Clinical Ethics Beyond the Urban Hospital.Erica K. Salter & Joseph T. Norris - 2015 - HEC Forum 27 (2):87-91.
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  16.  2
    Introduction to the Special Issue on Pediatric Decision-Making.Erica K. Salter - 2024 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 67 (2):181-185.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Introduction to the Special Issue on Pediatric Decision-MakingErica K. SalterUnlike in the traditional decisional dyad in adult-based care, pediatric decision-making typically involves a triadic relationship among the patient, their parents, and the health-care providers. This complex relationship raises questions and concerns regarding each party’s expectations, obligations, and authority. For example, should a parent be allowed to withhold a poor diagnosis from an adolescent patient? Should an HLA-matched six-year-old sister (...)
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  17.  17
    Suicide Attempts and the Obligations of Medical Providers.Erica K. Salter - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (8):121-122.
    Cases like Mr. Walker’s are distressing, and for good reason. The Supreme Court has given clear moral and legal reasons to distinguish life-saving treatment refusal from suicide, and physicians are...
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  18.  17
    Should We Tell Annie?: Preparing for Death at the Intersection of Parental Authority and Adolescent Autonomy.Erica K. Salter - 2013 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 3 (1):81-88.
    This case analysis examines the pediatric clinical ethics issues of adolescent autonomy and parental authority in medical decision–making. The case involves a dying adolescent whose parents request that the medical team withhold diagnosis and prognosis information from the patient. The analysis engages two related ethical questions: Should Annie be given information about her medical condition? And, who is the proper decision–maker in Annie’s case? Ultimately, four practical recommendations are offered.
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  19.  6
    When Better Isn’t Good Enough: Commentary on Ross’s “Better than Best (Interest Standard) in Pediatric Decision Making”.Erica K. Salter - 2019 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 30 (3):213-217.
    In this commentary, the author discusses two strengths and two weaknesses of “Better than Best (Interest Standard) in Pediatric Decision-Making,” in which Lainie Friedman Ross critiques the best interest standard and proposes her own model of constrained parental autonomy (CPA) as a preferable replacement for both an intervention principle and a guidance principle in pediatric decision making. The CPA’s strengths are that it detaches from the language and concept of “best” and that it better respects the family as a distinct (...)
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