21 found
Order:
See also
Erik Anderson
Drew University
Erik Anderson
Furman University
  1. Aesthetic Appreciation of Silence.Erik Anderson - 2020 - Contemporary Aesthetics 18.
    We enjoy sounds. What about silence: the absence of sound? Certainly not all, but surely many of us seek out, attend to, and appreciate silence. But, if nothing is there, then there is nothing to possess aesthetic qualities that might engage aesthetic interest or reward aesthetic attention. This is at least puzzling, perhaps even paradoxical. In this paper, I attempt to dispel the sense of paradox and provide a way to understand aesthetic appreciation of silence. I argue that silence can (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  2. A Defense of the 'Sterility Objection' to the New Natural Lawyers' Argument Against Same-Sex Marriage.Erik A. Anderson - 2013 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 16 (4):759-775.
    The “new natural lawyers” (NNLs) are a prolific group of philosophers, theologians, and political theorists that includes John Finnis, Robert George, Patrick Lee, Gerard Bradley, and Germain Grisez, among others. These thinkers have devoted themselves to developing and defending a traditional sexual ethic according to which homosexual sexual acts are immoral per se and marriage ought to remain an exclusively heterosexual institution. The sterility objection holds that the NNLs are guilty of making an arbitrary and irrational distinction between same-sex couples (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  3.  64
    Kant, Natural Kind Terms, and Scientific Essentialism.Erik Anderson - 1994 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 11 (4):355 - 373.
    What, for Kant, is the semantic status of the proposition: Water is H2O? Is it analytic or synthetic? The question is not one of merely esoteric import since an answer to it would constitute a statement about the meaningfulness of all our scientific propositions. And, insofar as the Critique is a defense of the possibility of the natural sciences, it seems that we should be able to find in it the answer to our question. Further, we should be able to (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  4. Sailing the Seas of Cheese.Erik Anderson - 2010 - Contemporary Aesthetics 8.
    Memphis Elvis is cool; Vegas Elvis is cheesy. How come? To call something cheesy is, ostensibly, to disparage it, and yet cheesy acts are some of the most popular in popular culture today. How is this possible? The concepts of cheese, cheesy, and cheesiness play an important and increasingly ubiquitous role in popular culture today. I offer an analysis of these concepts, distinguishing them from nearby concepts like kitchy and campy. Along the way I draw attention to the important roles (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  5. In a Silent Way.Erik Anderson - 2020 - Journal of Aesthetics and Culture 12 (1).
    I argue that silence is replete with aesthetic character and that it can be a rewarding object of aesthetic appreciation, assessment, and appraisal. The appreciation of silence might initially seem impossible, for, it might seem, there is nothing there to behold. Taking up this challenge, I attempt to dispel the sense of paradox. I contend that, despite our never actually experiencing absolute silence, there is much to enjoy in the silences that we do experience. I go on to argue that (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  66
    Countering MacKinnon on Rape and Consent.Erik A. Anderson - 2022 - Social Philosophy Today 38:17-32.
    Feminists are divided on whether consent should be employed in legal definitions of rape. Catharine MacKinnon has criticized the usefulness of consent in enabling legal systems to recognize and prosecute instances of rape (MacKinnon 1989, 2005, 2016). In a recent article in this journal, Lisa H. Schwartzman defends the use of affirmative consent in rape law against MacKinnon’s critique (Schwartzman 2019). In contrast to MacKinnon, Schwartzman claims our understanding of rape must include both force and consent components. In this paper, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  23
    The Paradox of Public Secularism.Erik A. Anderson - 2006 - Faith and Philosophy 23 (2):137-155.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  8.  11
    The Paradox of Public Secularism.Erik A. Anderson - 2006 - Faith and Philosophy 23 (2):137-155.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  9. How General is Generalized Scientific Essentialism?Erik Anderson - 2005 - Synthese 144 (3):373-379.
    I look at a recent argument offered in defense of a doctrine which I will call generalized scientific essentialism. This is the doctrine according to which, not only are some facts about substance composition metaphysically necessary, but, in addition, some facts about substance behavior are metaphysically necessary. More specifically, so goes the argument, not only is water necessarily composed of H2O and salt is necessarily composed of NaCl, but, in addition, salt necessarily dissolves in water. If this argument is sound, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  10. Ethics Commands, Aesthetics Demands.Erik Anderson - 2010 - Environmental Philosophy 7 (2):115-133.
    I identify a commonly held position in environmental philosophy, “the received view,” and argue that its proponents beg the question when challenged to demonstrate the relevance of environmental aesthetics for environmental justice. I call this “the inference problem,” and I go on to argue that an alternative to the received view, Arnold Berleant’s participatory engagement model, is better equipped to meet the challenge it poses. By adopting an alternative metaphysics, the engagement model supplies a solution to the inference problem and (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  46
    Deliberative Sincerity and the Opacity of the Self.Erik A. Anderson - 2020 - Journal of Social Philosophy 51 (3):422-440.
  12.  22
    A Comment on Rahel Jaeggi’s Critique of Forms of Life.Erik A. Anderson - 2020 - Social Philosophy Today 36:205-210.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Amy Gu tmann, ed., Freedom of Association Reviewed by.Erik A. Anderson - 1999 - Philosophy in Review 19 (3):183-185.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  34
    Religiously Conservative Citizens and the Ideal of Conscientious Engagement: A Comment on Wolterstorff and Eberle.Erik A. Anderson - 2013 - Philosophia 41 (2):411-427.
    Nicholas Wolterstorff and Christopher J. Eberle have defended the view that the ethics of liberal citizenship allows citizens to publicly support the passage of coercive laws based solely on their religious convictions. They also develop positive conceptions of virtuous citizenship that place moral limits on how citizens may appeal to their religion. The question I address in this essay is whether the limits they impose on citizens’ appeals to their religion are adequate. Since Eberle’s “ideal of conscientious engagement” provides us (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  26
    Scientific Essentialism, Could’ve Done Otherwise, and the Possibility of Freedom.Erik Anderson - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 15:13-20.
    Philosophers concerned with the problem of freedom and determinism differ strikingly over the analysis of the concept of human freedom of the will. Compatibilists and incompatibilists, determinists and indeterminists populate the conceptual landscape with a dizzying array of theories differing in complex and subtle ways. Each of these analyses faces an under-appreciated potential challenge: the challenge from scientific essentialism. Might all traditional analyses of freedom of the will be radically ill-conceived because the concept—the nature of freedom itself—is something discoverable only (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  3
    Sailing the Seas of Cheese.Erik Anderson - 2023 - In Max Ryynänen & Paco Barragán (eds.), The Changing Meaning of Kitsch: From Rejection to Acceptance. Palgrave / MacMillan (Springer Verlag). pp. 87-117.
    Memphis Elvis is cool; Vegas Elvis is cheesy. How come? To call something cheesy is, ostensibly, to disparage it, and yet cheesy acts are some of the most popular in popular culture today. How is this possible? The concepts of cheese, cheesy, and cheesiness play an important and increasingly ubiquitous role in popular culture today. I offer an analysis of these concepts, distinguishing them from nearby concepts like kitschy and campy. Along the way I draw attention to the important roles (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. Amy Gutmann, ed., Freedom of Association. [REVIEW]Erik Anderson - 1999 - Philosophy in Review 19:183-185.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Critical Faith: Toward A Renewed Understanding of Religious Life and Its Public Accountability, by Ronald A. Kuipers. [REVIEW]Erik Anderson - 2003 - Ars Disputandi 3.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19.  32
    Fashionable Nihilism. [REVIEW]Erik Anderson - 2002 - Newsletter of the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy 30 (92):47-49.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20.  22
    Reading Dewey. [REVIEW]Erik Anderson - 2001 - Newsletter of the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy 29 (90):19-20.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21.  4
    Reading Dewey. [REVIEW]Erik Anderson - 2001 - Newsletter of the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy 29 (90):19-20.