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Erik Magnusson
University of Manitoba
  1.  34
    How to Reject Benatar's Asymmetry Argument.Erik Magnusson - 2019 - Bioethics 33 (6):674-683.
    In this article I reconsider David Benatar's primary argument for anti‐natalism—the asymmetry argument—and outline a three‐step process for rejecting it. I begin in Part 2 by reconstructing the asymmetry argument into three main premises. I then turn in Parts 3–5 to explain how each of these premises is in fact false. Finally, I conclude in Part 6 by considering the relationship between the asymmetry argument and the quality of life argument in Benatar's overall case for anti‐natalism and argue that it (...)
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  2.  4
    Can Gestation Ground Parental Rights?Erik Magnusson - 2020 - Social Theory and Practice 46 (1):111-142.
    In law and common-sense morality, it is generally assumed that adults who meet a minimum threshold of parental competency have a presumptive right to parent their biological children. But what is the basis of this right? According to one prominent account, the right to parent one’s biological child is best understood as being grounded in an intimate relationship that develops between babies and their birth parents during the process of gestation. This paper identifies three major problems facing this view—the explanatory, (...)
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  3.  35
    Children’s Rights and the Non-Identity Problem.Erik Magnusson - 2019 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 49 (5):580-605.
    Can appealing to children’s rights help to solve the non-identity problem in cases of procreation? A number of philosophers have answered affirmatively, arguing that even if children cannot be harmed by being born into disadvantaged conditions, they may nevertheless be wronged if those conditions fail to meet a minimal standard of decency to which all children are putatively entitled. This paper defends the tenability of this view by outlining and responding to five prominent objections that have been raised against it (...)
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  4.  10
    Parental Justice and the Kids Pay View.Erik Magnusson - 2018 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 21 (4):963-977.
    In a just society, who should be liable for the significant costs associated with creating and raising children? Patrick Tomlin has recently argued that children themselves may be liable on the grounds that they benefit from being raised into independent adults. This view, which Tomlin calls ‘Kids Pay’, depends on the more general principle that a beneficiary can incur an obligation to share in the cost of an essential benefit that the benefactor is responsible for her requiring. I argue in (...)
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  5.  12
    David Benatar and David Wasserman, Debating Procreation: Is It Wrong to Reproduce? [REVIEW]Erik Magnusson - 2016 - Social Theory and Practice 42 (4):894-900.
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  6.  9
    One Child: Do We Have a Right to More? [REVIEW]Erik Magnusson - 2016 - Contemporary Political Theory 15 (4):477-480.