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  1.  44
    Culture of Disengagement in Engineering Education.Erin A. Cech - 2014 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 39 (1):42-72.
    Much has been made of the importance of training ethical, socially conscious engineers, but does US engineering education actually encourage neophytes to take seriously their professional responsibility to public welfare? Counter to such ideals of engagement, I argue that students’ interest in public welfare concerns may actually decline over the course of their engineering education. Using unique longitudinal survey data of students at four colleges, this article examines (a) how students’ public welfare beliefs change during their engineering education, (b) whether (...)
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  2.  6
    Mechanism or Myth?: Family Plans and the Reproduction of Occupational Gender Segregation.Erin A. Cech - 2016 - Gender and Society 30 (2):265-288.
    Occupational gender segregation is an obdurate feature of gender inequality in the United States The “family plans thesis”—the belief that women and men deliberately adjust their early career decisions to accommodate their anticipated family roles—is a common theoretical explanation of this segregation in the social sciences and in popular discourse. But do young men and women actually account for their family plans when making occupational choices? This article investigates the validity of this central mechanism of the family plans thesis. Drawing (...)
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    Epistemological Dominance and Social Inequality: Experiences of Native American Science, Engineering, and Health Students.Karen deVries, Jessi L. Smith, Anneke Metz & Erin A. Cech - 2017 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 42 (5):743-774.
    Can epistemologies anchor processes of social inequality? In this paper, we consider how epistemological dominance in science, engineering, and health fields perpetuates disadvantages for students who enter higher education with alternative epistemologies. Drawing on in-depth interviews with Native American students enrolled at two US research universities who adhere to or revere indigenous epistemologies, we find that epistemological dominance in SE&H degree programs disadvantages students through three processes. First, it delegitimizes Native epistemologies and marginalizes and silences students who value them. Second, (...)
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