Results for 'Erin Louise Palmer'

999 found
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  1.  28
    Effective Use of Consent Forms and Interactive Questions in the Consent Process.Barton W. Palmer, Erin L. Cassidy, Laura B. Dunn, Adam P. Spira & Javaid I. Sheikh - 2008 - IRB: Ethics & Human Research 30 (2):8.
    Although written consent forms are standard in clinical research, there is little regulatory or empirical guidance regarding how to most effectively review consent forms with potential participants. We developed an algorithm for embedding five questions with corrective feedback while reading consent forms with potential participants, and then applied it in the context of seven clinical research studies. A substantial proportion of participants within each protocol displayed initially inadequate responses to at least one question, but after the protocol elements were explained (...)
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  2.  8
    Face detection from patterns of shading and shadows: The role of overhead illumination in generating the familiar appearance of the human face.Colin J. Palmer, Erin Goddard & Colin W. G. Clifford - 2022 - Cognition 225 (C):105172.
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  3.  6
    A New Course in Chemistry: Lavoisier's First Chemical PaperMarco Beretta.Louise Y. Palmer - 1996 - Isis 87 (1):179-180.
  4.  17
    Letters to the Editor.Daniel Simberloff, Philip J. Pauly, Wesley M. Stevens, William D. McCready, Marco Beretta, Louise Y. Palmer, Steven Shapin & Mordechai Feingold - 1996 - Isis 87 (4):676-687.
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  5.  98
    Plato's reception of parmenides. John A. Palmer.Mary Louise Gill - 2001 - Mind 110 (439):806-810.
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  6.  35
    Attitudes Toward Cognitive Enhancement: The Role of Metaphor and Context.Erin C. Conrad, Stacey Humphries & Anjan Chatterjee - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 10 (1):35-47.
    The widespread use of stimulants among healthy individuals to improve cognition has received growing attention; however, public attitudes toward this practice are not well understood. We determined the effect of framing metaphors and context of use on public opinion toward cognitive enhancement. We recruited 3,727 participants from the United States to complete three surveys using Amazon’s Mechanical Turk between April and July 2017. Participants read vignettes describing an individual using cognitive enhancement, varying framing metaphors (fuel versus steroid), and context of (...)
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  7. Bias and Knowledge: Two Metaphors.Erin Beeghly - 2020 - In Erin Beeghly & Alex Madva (eds.), An Introduction to Implicit Bias: Knowledge, Justice, and the Social Mind. New York, NY, USA: Routledge. pp. 77-98.
    If you care about securing knowledge, what is wrong with being biased? Often it is said that we are less accurate and reliable knowers due to implicit biases. Likewise, many people think that biases reflect inaccurate claims about groups, are based on limited experience, and are insensitive to evidence. Chapter 3 investigates objections such as these with the help of two popular metaphors: bias as fog and bias as shortcut. Guiding readers through these metaphors, I argue that they clarify the (...)
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  8. Assisting Wild Animals Vulnerable to Climate Change: Why Ethical Strategies Diverge.Clare Palmer - 2021 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 38 (2):179-195.
    Many individual sentient wild animals are vulnerable to anthropogenic climate change. In this article, I suggest that animal ethicists who take sentient animals’ moral status seriously are likely to agree that, other things being equal, we have moral responsibilities to assist wild animals made vulnerable to climate change. However, I also argue that these ethicists are likely to diverge in terms of the strategies they believe would actually fulfil such moral responsibilities, depending on whether their primary concern is rectificatory justice (...)
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  9.  91
    Reduction with Autonomy.Louise M. Antony & Joseph Levine - 1997 - Noûs 31 (S11):83-105.
  10. Animal Disenhancement and the Non-Identity Problem: A Response to Thompson.Clare Palmer - 2011 - NanoEthics 5 (1):43-48.
    In his paper The Opposite of Human Enhancement: Nanotechnology and the Blind Chicken problem (Nanoethics 2:305–316, 2008) Paul Thompson argues that the possibility of disenhancing animals in order to improve animal welfare poses a philosophical conundrum. Although many people intuitively think such disenhancement would be morally impermissible, it’s difficult to find good arguments to support such intuitions. In this brief response to Thompson, I accept that there’s a conundrum here. But I argue that if we seriously consider whether creating beings (...)
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  11.  9
    Saying ‘No’ to Power: From Diasporic Knowledge to Reclaiming Ethical Monotheism.Gesine Palmer - 2024 - The European Legacy 29 (3-4):361-372.
    In European philosophies of history, the linear paradigm that has prevailed for centuries as a derivative of Christian salvation history (Heilsgeschichte), ultimately lost its monopoly with the arrival of the “post-age.” The result of this has been that ideas that have survived on the margins, even the cyclical interpretation of time attached to religious traditions, now seem capable of outliving the short-lived belief in continuous progress. According to the cyclical view of history, those who came last will leave first, with (...)
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  12. Discrimination & Disrespect.Erin Beeghly - 2017 - In Kasper Lippert-Rasmussen (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of the Ethics of Discrimination. New York: Routledge. pp. 83 - 96.
    In this essay, I explore the view that wrongful discrimination is disrespectful. In section 1, I articulate three conceptions of disrespect, each of which provides a special way to understand the way in which wrongful discrimination is disrespectful. In section 2, I ask what it would take for any of these conceptions to serve as the basis for a plausible theory of wrongful discrimination. I argue that any adequate theory of wrongful discrimination must be able to do two things well: (...)
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  13.  44
    Relationscapes: Movement, Art, Philosophy.Erin Manning - 2012 - MIT Press.
    With _Relationscapes_, Erin Manning offers a new philosophy of movement challenging the idea that movement is simple displacement in space, knowable only in terms of the actual. Exploring the relation between sensation and thought through the prisms of dance, cinema, art, and new media, Manning argues for the intensity of movement. From this idea of intensity--the incipiency at the heart of movement--Manning develops the concept of preacceleration, which makes palpable how movement creates relational intervals out of which displacements take (...)
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  14.  79
    Animal Ethics in Context.Clare Palmer - 2010 - Columbia University Press.
    It is widely agreed that because animals feel pain we should not make them suffer gratuitously. Some ethical theories go even further: because of the capacities that they possess, animals have the right not to be harmed or killed. These views concern what not to do to animals, but we also face questions about when we should, and should not, assist animals that are hungry or distressed. Should we feed a starving stray kitten? And if so, does this commit us, (...)
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  15. An Introduction to Implicit Bias: Knowledge, Justice, and the Social Mind.Erin Beeghly & Alex Madva (eds.) - 2020 - New York, NY, USA: Routledge.
    Written by a diverse range of scholars, this accessible introductory volume asks: What is implicit bias? How does implicit bias compromise our knowledge of others and social reality? How does implicit bias affect us, as individuals and participants in larger social and political institutions, and what can we do to combat biases? An interdisciplinary enterprise, the volume brings together the philosophical perspective of the humanities with the perspective of the social sciences to develop rich lines of inquiry. Its 12 chapters (...)
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  16.  22
    Beyond the Brain: How Body and Environment Shape Animal and Human Minds.Louise Barrett - 2011 - Princeton University Press.
    When a chimpanzee stockpiles rocks as weapons or when a frog sends out mating calls, we might easily assume these animals know their own motivations--that they use the same psychological mechanisms that we do. But as Beyond the Brain indicates, this is a dangerous assumption because animals have different evolutionary trajectories, ecological niches, and physical attributes. How do these differences influence animal thinking and behavior? Removing our human-centered spectacles, Louise Barrett investigates the mind and brain and offers an alternative (...)
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  17.  42
    I'm a Mother, I Worry.Louise M. Antony - 1995 - Philosophical Issues 6:160-166.
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  18.  4
    Overseeing Research Practice: The Case of Data Editing.Erin Leahey - 2008 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 33 (5):605-630.
    This article examines whether and how a particular research practice is overseen and supervised, and by whom. This investigation fills notable gaps in the literature on science, including a lack of emphasis on larger sociopolitical structures, a neglect of regulation, and indifference toward ethics. The author focuses on the oversight of a particular research practice; data editing; which embodies qualities that are intriguing to sociologists of science: invisibility, uncertainty, heterogeneity, and reliance on tacit knowledge. These characteristics pose unique challenges to (...)
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  19.  1
    Pediatric Decision-Making for Children in State Custody.Erin Talati Paquette & Lou Vinarcsik - 2024 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 67 (2):290-304.
    In summer 2022, six points of consensus emerged from a symposium addressing the question, “In the context of U.S. pediatric care, what moral precepts ought to guide parents and clinicians in medical decision making for children?” (Salter et al. 2023). The authors of this statement wrote, however, that the points of consensus may require modification or may not apply in their entirety to children in state custody. This article addresses the consensus recommendations in the context of the thousands of children (...)
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  20.  23
    Feminist interpretations of William James.Erin C. Tarver & Shannon Sullivan (eds.) - 2015 - University Park, Pennsylvania: The Pennsylvania State University Press.
    A collection of essays examining the writings of William James. Provides a reinterpretation of pragmatism to devise philosophical resources for pragmatist feminism that challenge sexism and male privilege"--Provided by publisher.
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  21. Introducing Implicit Bias: Why this Book Matters.Erin Beeghly & Alex Madva - 2020 - In Erin Beeghly & Alex Madva (eds.), An Introduction to Implicit Bias: Knowledge, Justice, and the Social Mind. New York, NY, USA: Routledge. pp. 1-19.
    Written by a diverse range of scholars, this accessible introductory volume asks: What is implicit bias? How does implicit bias compromise our knowledge of others and social reality? How does implicit bias affect us, as individuals and participants in larger social and political institutions, and what can we do to combat biases? An interdisciplinary enterprise, the volume brings together the philosophical perspective of the humanities with the perspective of the social sciences to develop rich lines of inquiry. It is written (...)
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  22.  12
    I_– _Louise M. Antony.Louise M. Antony - 1997 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 71 (1):177-208.
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  23.  53
    Boring thoughts and bored minds: The MAC model of boredom and cognitive engagement.Erin C. Westgate & Timothy D. Wilson - 2018 - Psychological Review 125 (5):689-713.
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  24.  82
    Companion Animal Ethics.Clare Palmer, Sandra Corr & Peter Sandoe - 2015 - Wiley.
    Companion Animal Ethics explores the important ethical questions and problems that arise as a result of humans keeping animals as companions. The first comprehensive book dedicated to ethical and welfare concerns surrounding companion animals Scholarly but still written in an accessible and engaging style Considers the idea of animal companionship and why it should matter ethically Explores problems associated with animals sharing human lifestyles and homes, such as obesity, behavior issues, selective breeding, over-treatment, abandonment, euthanasia and environmental impacts Offers insights (...)
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  25.  40
    I_– _Louise M. Antony.Louise M. Antony - 1997 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 71 (1):177-208.
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  26.  27
    Science as Salvation: A Modern Myth and its Meaning.Frank Palmer - 1993 - Philosophical Quarterly 43 (172):396-397.
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  27.  33
    The proportional lack of archaeal pathogens: Do viruses/phages hold the key?Erin E. Gill & Fiona Sl Brinkman - 2011 - Bioessays 33 (4):248-254.
    Although Archaea inhabit the human body and possess some characteristics of pathogens, there is a notable lack of pathogenic archaeal species identified to date. We hypothesize that the scarcity of disease‐causing Archaea is due, in part, to mutually‐exclusive phage and virus populations infecting Bacteria and Archaea, coupled with an association of bacterial virulence factors with phages or mobile elements. The ability of bacterial phages to infect Bacteria and then use them as a vehicle to infect eukaryotes may be difficult for (...)
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  28.  7
    Semantics: a new outline.Frank Robert Palmer - 1976 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
  29.  59
    The Limits of Blame: Rethinking Punishment and Responsibility.Erin Kelly - 2018 - Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press.
    Faith in the power and righteousness of retribution has taken over the American criminal justice system. Approaching punishment and responsibility from a philosophical perspective, Limits of Blame takes issue with a criminal justice system that aligns legal criteria of guilt with moral criteria of blameworthiness. Many incarcerated people do not meet the criteria of blameworthiness, even when they are guilty of crimes. The author underscores the problems of exaggerating what criminal guilt indicates, particularly when it is tied to the illusion (...)
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  30.  62
    Republicanism: A Theory of Freedom and Government.Erin Kelly & Philip Pettit - 1999 - Philosophical Review 108 (1):90.
    In his most recent book, Philip Pettit presents and defends a “republican” political philosophy that stems from a tradition that includes Cicero, Machiavelli, James Harrington, Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, and Madison. The book provides an interpretation of what is distinctive about republicanism—namely, Pettit claims, its notion of freedom as nondomination. He sketches the history of this notion, and he argues that it entails a unique justification of certain political arrangements and the virtues of citizenship that would make those arrangements possible. Of (...)
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  31. Stability and Justification in Hume’s Treatise, Another Look- A Response to Erin Kelly, Frederick Schmitt, and Michael Williams.Erin I. Kelly - 2004 - Hume Studies 30 (2):339-404.
    Hume’s moral philosophy is a sentiment-based view. Moral judgment is a matter of the passions; certain traits of character count as virtues or vices because of the approval or disapproval they evoke in us, feelings that express concern we have about the social effects of these traits. A sentiment-based approach is attractive, since morality seems fundamentally to involve caring for other people. Sentiment-based views, however, face a real challenge. It is clear that our affections are often particular; we favor certain (...)
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  32. What is a Stereotype? What is Stereotyping?Erin Beeghly - 2015 - Hypatia 30 (4):675-691.
    If someone says, “Asians are good at math” or “women are empathetic,” I might interject, “you're stereotyping” in order to convey my disapproval of their utterance. But why is stereotyping wrong? Before we can answer this question, we must better understand what stereotypes are and what stereotyping is. In this essay, I develop what I call the descriptive view of stereotypes and stereotyping. This view is assumed in much of the psychological and philosophical literature on implicit bias and stereotyping, yet (...)
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  33. Failing to Treat Persons as Individuals.Erin Beeghly - 2018 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 5.
    If someone says, “You’ve stereotyped me,” we hear the statement as an accusation. One way to interpret the accusation is as follows: you haven’t seen or treated me as an individual. In this essay, I interpret and evaluate a theory of wrongful stereotyping inspired by this thought, which I call the failure-to-individualize theory of wrongful stereotyping. According to this theory, stereotyping is wrong if and only if it involves failing to treat persons as individuals. I argue that the theory—however one (...)
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  34.  9
    Living with Animals: Rights, Responsibilities, and Respect.Erin Mckenna - 2020 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    This accessible work of scholarship brings a pragmatist ecofeminist perspective to discussions around animal rights, animal welfare, and animal ethics. Rather than seek absolute moral stands regarding human and animal relationships, and rather than trying to end such relationships altogether, the books urges us to make existing relations better.
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  35.  24
    Notes from a feminist killjoy: essays on everyday life.Erin Wunker - 2017 - Toronto: BookThug.
    Erin Wunker is a feminist killjoy, and she thinks you should be one, too. Following in the tradition of Sara Ahmed (the originator of the concept "feminist killjoy"), Wunker brings memoir, theory, literary criticism, pop culture, and feminist thinking together in this collection of essays that take up Ahmed's project as a multi-faceted lens through which to read the world from a feminist point of view. Neither totemic nor complete, the non-fiction essays that make up Notes from a Feminist (...)
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  36. What (If Anything) Do We Owe Wild Animals?Clare A. Palmer - 2013 - Between the Species 16 (1):4.
    It’s widely agreed that animal pain matters morally – that we shouldn’t, for instance, starve our animal companions, and that we should provide medical care to sick or injured agricultural animals, and not only because it benefits us to do so. But do we have the same moral responsibilities towards wild animals? Should we feed them if they are starving, and intervene to prevent them from undergoing other forms of suffering, for instance from predation? Using an example that includes both (...)
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  37.  13
    Women's Anti-Imperialism, “The White Man's Burden,” and the Philippine-American War: Theorizing Masculinist Ambivalence in Protest.Erin L. Murphy - 2009 - Gender and Society 23 (2):244-270.
    During the Philippine-American War, the Anti-Imperialist League was the organizational vanguard of an anti-imperialist movement. Research on this period of U.S. imperialism has focused on empire building, ignoring the gendered activity of anti-imperialists in the metropole. The author outlines the constitutive relationship between gendered structures and experience that informed anti-imperialists' “contentious politics,” using archival sources of the Anti-Imperialist League and anti-imperialist debates in newspapers. The author shows how anti-imperialist leaders informally included women's monetary donations, labor, networks, and reputations while formally (...)
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  38.  15
    Methodology, Legend, and Rhetoric: The Constructions of AI by Academia, Industry, and Policy Groups for Lifelong Learning.Erin Young & Rebecca Eynon - 2021 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 46 (1):166-191.
    Artificial intelligence is again attracting significant attention across all areas of social life. One important sphere of focus is education; many policy makers across the globe view lifelong learning as an essential means to prepare society for an “AI future” and look to AI as a way to “deliver” learning opportunities to meet these needs. AI is a complex social, cultural, and material artifact that is understood and constructed by different stakeholders in varied ways, and these differences have significant social (...)
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  39.  14
    The Joy of Science: Disciplinary Diversity in Emotional Accounts.Erin Leahey, Cindy L. Cain & Sharon Koppman - 2015 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 40 (1):30-70.
    Science and emotions are typically juxtaposed: science is considered rational and unattached to outcomes, whereas emotions are considered irrational and harmful to science. Ethnographic studies of the daily lives of scientists have problematized this opposition, focusing on the emotional experiences of scientists as they go about their work, but they reveal little about disciplinary differences. We build on these studies by analyzing Citation Classics: accounts about the making of influential science. We document how highly cited scientists retrospectively describe emotional aspects (...)
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  40.  11
    Classical Music Students’ Pre-performance Anxiety, Catastrophizing, and Bodily Complaints Vary by Age, Gender, and Instrument and Predict Self-Rated Performance Quality.Erinë Sokoli, Horst Hildebrandt & Patrick Gomez - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13:905680.
    Music performance anxiety (MPA) is a multifaceted phenomenon occurring on a continuum of severity. In this survey study, we investigated to what extent the affective (anxiety), cognitive (catastrophizing), and somatic (bodily complaints) components of MPA prior to solo performances vary as a function of age, gender, instrument group, musical experience, and practice as well as how these MPA components relate to self-rated change in performance quality from practice to public performance. The sample comprised 75 male and 111 female classical music (...)
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  41.  16
    Concepts and Stereotypes Georges Key.Louise Antony Adler, Jerry Fodor, David Israel & Michael Lipton - 1999 - In Eric Margolis & Stephen Laurence (eds.), Concepts: Core Readings. MIT Press.
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  42.  15
    Help-Seeking for Mental Health Issues in Professional Rugby League Players.Susanna Kola-Palmer, Kiara Lewis, Alison Rodriguez & Derrol Kola-Palmer - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
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  43.  49
    The I in Team: Sports Fandom and the Reproduction of Identity.Erin C. Tarver - 2017 - Chicago, IL, USA: University of Chicago Press.
    There is one sound that will always be loudest in sports. It isn’t the squeak of sneakers or the crunch of helmets; it isn’t the grunts or even the stadium music. It’s the deafening roar of sports fans. For those few among us on the outside, sports fandom—with its war paint and pennants, its pricey cable TV packages and esoteric stats reeled off like code—looks highly irrational, entertainment gone overboard. But as Erin C. Tarver demonstrates in this book, sports (...)
  44.  20
    Perceived Organizational Politics, Engagement, and Stress: The Mediating Influence of Meaningful Work.Erin M. Landells & Simon L. Albrecht - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  45.  11
    Statistically Induced Chunking Recall: A Memory‐Based Approach to Statistical Learning.Erin S. Isbilen, Stewart M. McCauley, Evan Kidd & Morten H. Christiansen - 2020 - Cognitive Science 44 (7):e12848.
    The computations involved in statistical learning have long been debated. Here, we build on work suggesting that a basic memory process, chunking, may account for the processing of statistical regularities into larger units. Drawing on methods from the memory literature, we developed a novel paradigm to test statistical learning by leveraging a robust phenomenon observed in serial recall tasks: that short‐term memory is fundamentally shaped by long‐term distributional learning. In the statistically induced chunking recall (SICR) task, participants are exposed to (...)
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  46.  43
    A food politics of the possible? Growing sustainable food systems through networks of knowledge.Alison Blay-Palmer, Roberta Sonnino & Julien Custot - 2016 - Agriculture and Human Values 33 (1):27-43.
    There is increased recognition of a common suite of global challenges that hamper food system sustainability at the community scale. Food price volatility, shortages of basic commodities, increased global rates of obesity and non-communicable food-related diseases, and land grabbing are among the impediments to socially just, economically robust, ecologically regenerative and politically inclusive food systems. While international political initiatives taken in response to these challenges and the groundswell of local alternatives emerging in response to challenges are well documented, more attention (...)
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  47. We Gave Them Songs About Taking Your Own Damn Stand:" A Blueprint For De/Reconstructing Metadata Creation As A Public Service.Erin Leach - 2020 - In Veronica Arellano Douglas & Joanna Gadsby (eds.), Deconstructing service in libraries: intersections of identities and expectations. Sacramento, CA: Litwin Books.
     
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  48.  16
    The role of world trade organizations in settling trade disputes between the united states and the european union.Erin Walker - 2002 - Inquiry: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing 3.
  49.  17
    The Book of Greek and Roman Folktales, Legends, and Myths: edited and translated by William Hansen, Princeton, NJ, Princeton University Press, 2017, 584 pp., $35.00/£24.95.Erin Warford - 2019 - The European Legacy 25 (2):234-235.
    Volume 25, Issue 2, February - March 2020, Page 234-235.
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  50.  12
    Public Relations Primed: An Update on Practitioners’ Moral Reasoning, from Moral Development to Moral Maintenance.Erin Schauster, Marlene S. Neill, Patrick Ferrucci & Edson Tandoc - 2020 - Journal of Media Ethics 35 (3):164-179.
    Guided by theories of moral psychology and social identity, one hundred and fifty-three public relations practitioners working in the United States participated in an online experiment that tested...
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