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Eske Møllgaard [9]Eske J. Møllgaard [2]
  1.  31
    An Introduction to Daoist Thought: Action, Language, and Ethics in Zhuangzi.Eske Møllgaard - 2007 - Routledge.
    This is the first work available in English which addresses Zhuangzi’s thought as a whole. It presents an interpretation of the Zhuangzi, a book in thirty-three chapters that is the most important collection of Daoist texts in early China. The author introduces a complex reading that shows the unity of Zhuangzi’s thought, in particular in his views of action, language, and ethics. By addressing methodological questions that arise in reading Zhuangzi, a hermeneutics is developed which makes understanding Zhuangzi’s religious thought (...)
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  2.  16
    Political Confucianism and the Politics of Confucian Studies.Eske J. Møllgaard - 2015 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 14 (3):391-402.
    Through the 1980s Confucian studies in the United States tended to present Confucianism as compatible with liberal democratic values. Since the 1990s, after the rise of China as a global power, Confucianism is increasingly defended as a political alternative to liberal and democratic values. This essay argues that Confucianism is not compatible with liberal democratic values, and that the rise of political Confucianism opposed to liberal democracy is a return to a more authentic Confucianism. Furthermore, it is argued that the (...)
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  3.  12
    Confucianism as Anthropological Machine.Eske Møllgaard - 2010 - Asian Philosophy 20 (2):127-140.
    Confucianism is a kind of humanism. Confucian humanism presupposes, however, a divisive act that separates human and nonhuman. This paper shows that the split between the human and the nonhuman is central to Mencius' moral psychology, and it argues that Confucianism is an anthropological machine in the sense of the term used by Giorgio Agamben. I consider the main points of early Daoist critique of Confucian humanism. A comparative analysis of Herman Melville's novella 'Bartleby the Scrivener' reveals the limitation of (...)
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  4.  10
    Eclipse of Reading: On the “Philosophical Turn” in American Sinology.Eske Møllgaard - 2005 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 4 (2):321-340.
  5.  64
    Zhuangzi's Notion of Transcendental Life.Eske Møllgaard - 2005 - Asian Philosophy 15 (1):1-18.
    In the post-metaphysical climate of the modern Western academy, Chinese thought is often seen as a happy pragmatism free from transcendental pretense. The article shows, on the contrary, that the early Daoist thinker Zhuangzi had not only one but at least two distinct notions of transcendence. The focus is on Zhuangzi's notion of transcendental life, or the life of Heaven as opposed to the life of man. Based on the explication of Zhuangzi's notion of transcendental life, the article provides a (...)
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  6.  24
    Slavoj Žižek's Critique of Western Buddhism.Eske Møllgaard - 2008 - Contemporary Buddhism 9 (2):167-180.
    Slavoj ?i?ek's incisive critique of western Buddhism raises the following questions: Is western Buddhism the paradigmatic ideology of late capitalism? Is Buddhism nihilistic absorption in nothingness? Does Buddhism negate the Real together with the imaginary? Is Buddhist metaphysics violent? The essay considers these questions and asks if western Buddhism, contrary to what ?i?ek argues, may become an antidote to the nihilism that pervades late capitalist societies.
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  7.  24
    Is Tu Wei-Ming Confucian?Eske Møllgaard - 2007 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 6 (4):397-411.
    Wei-ming’s discourse has been badly understood by some Western philosophers who study Confucianism. I suggest that this misunderstanding stems from the fact that these philosophers fail to realize that Confucian discourse is in an entirely different register from Western philosophical discourse. I then propose my own preliminary definition of Confucian discourse in five points and present a structural analysis of a text by Tu Wei-ming. Finally, I consider which features of Tu’s discourse can properly be called Confucian. The answer to (...)
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  8.  9
    Confucian Ritual and Modern Civility.Eske Møllgaard - 2012 - Journal of Global Ethics 8 (2-3):227-237.
    The Confucian notion of civility has for thousands of years guided all aspects of socio-ethical life in East Asia. Confucians express their central concern for civility in their notion of li, which is commonly translated ?ritual? and refers to the conventions and courtesies through which we submit to the socio-ethical order, as we do, for example, in performing sacrifices, weddings, and funerals, and various daily acts of deference. Since the rise of China and other East Asian countries as economic powers, (...)
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  9. An Introduction to Daoist Thought: Action, Language, and Ethics in Zhuangzi.Eske Møllgaard - 2011 - Routledge.
    This is the first work available in English which addresses Zhuangzi’s thought as a whole. It presents an interpretation of the Zhuangzi, a book in thirty-three chapters that is the most important collection of Daoist texts in early China. The author introduces a complex reading that shows the unity of Zhuangzi’s thought, in particular in his views of action, language, and ethics. By addressing methodological questions that arise in reading Zhuangzi, a hermeneutics is developed which makes understanding Zhuangzi’s religious thought (...)
     
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  10. An Introduction to Daoist Philosophies. By Steve Coutinho. New York: Columbia University Press, 2014. X, 231 Pp. Paperback. 978‐0‐231‐14339‐4. [REVIEW]Eske Møllgaard - 2015 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 42 (3-4):419-422.
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  11. Zhuangzi's Word, Heidegger's Word, and the Confucian Word.Eske J. Møllgaard - 2014 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 41 (3-4):454-469.
    Traditional Chinese commentators rightly see that understanding Zhuangzi's way with words is the presupposition for understanding Zhuangzi at all. They are not sure, however, if Zhuangzi's words are super-effective or pure nonsense. I consider Zhuangzi's experience with language, and then turn to Heidegger's word of being to see if it may throw light on Zhuangzi's way of saying. I argue that a conversation between Heidegger and Zhuangzi on language is possible, but only by expanding Heidegger's notion of Gestell and through (...)
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