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  1. Responsibility to Protect and Militarized Humanitarian Intervention: When and Why the Churches Failed to Discern Moral Hazard.Esther D. Reed - 2012 - Journal of Religious Ethics 40 (2):308-334.
    This essay addresses moral hazards associated with the emerging doctrine of the Responsibility to Protect (R2P). It reviews the broad acceptance by the Vatican and the World Council of Churches of the doctrine between September 2003 and September 2008, and attempts to identify grounds for more adequate investigation of the moral issues arising. Three themes are pursued: how a changing political context is affecting notions of sovereignty; the authority that can approve or refuse the use of force; and plural foundations (...)
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  2.  4
    Refugee Rights and State Sovereignty.Esther D. Reed - 2010 - Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics 30 (2):59-78.
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  3.  17
    The Limits of Individual Responsibility: Dietrich Bonhoeffer's Reversal of Agent-Act-Consequence.Esther D. Reed - 2017 - Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics 37 (2):39-58.
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  4.  75
    Responsibility to Protect and Militarized Humanitarian Intervention.Esther D. Reed - 2013 - Journal of Religious Ethics 41 (1):183-208.
    My essay “Responsibility to Protect and Militarized Humanitarian Intervention: When and Why the Churches Failed to Discern Moral Hazard” (JRE 40.2) called for more questioning engagement with R2P than the broadly uncritical welcome given by the churches to the doctrine between September 2003 and September 2008. In response to Luke Glanville's reply, this essay identifies further reasons for caution before accepting R2P and so-called humanitarian wars alongside defensive wars as paradigmatically justified. It is structured with reference to the tests in (...)
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  5.  8
    Book Reviews: Kenneth R. Himes, OFM, Drones and the Ethics of Targeted Killing. [REVIEW]Esther D. Reed - 2018 - Studies in Christian Ethics 31 (3):336-339.
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  6.  14
    Property Rights, Genes, and Common Good.Esther D. Reed - 2006 - Journal of Religious Ethics 34 (1):41-67.
    This paper applies aspects of Hugo Grotius's theologically informed theory of property to contemporary issues concerning access to the human DNA sequence and patenting practices. It argues that Christians who contribute to public debate in these areas might beneficially employ some of the concepts with which he worked--notably "common right," the "right of necessity," and "use right." In the seventeenth century, wars were fought over trading rights and access to the sea. In the twenty-first century, information and intellectual property are (...)
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  7.  13
    Introduction.Esther D. Reed - 2015 - Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (4):385-390.
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  8.  12
    Book Review: Carys Moseley, Nations and Nationalism in the Theology of Karl Barth. [REVIEW]Esther D. Reed - 2014 - Studies in Christian Ethics 27 (3):360-362.
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  9.  8
    Just War Reasoning in an Age of Risk.Esther D. Reed - 2015 - New Blackfriars 96 (1062):206-222.
  10.  19
    Natural Law Reasoning Between Statism and Dystopia: International Law and the Question of Authority.Esther D. Reed - 2010 - Jurisprudence 1 (2):169-196.
    This essay argues that a restatement of Thomistic natural law reasoning is increasingly necessary in jurisprudential debate about international law. Mindful of Pope John Paul II's call for a renewal of international law, the essay engages with the present-day tension between Morgenthau-type realism and neo-Kantian discourse-oriented cosmopolitanism. The essay addresses whether the former is sufficiently realistic in our global 21st century context, and whether the latter is adequately cosmopolitan. Attention is drawn to Aquinas's understanding of the relation between custom, consent (...)
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  11.  8
    In Defence of the Laws of War.Esther D. Reed - 2015 - Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (3):298-304.
    This essay warns that Nigel Biggar’s permissive reading of the classic, theological just war tradition is problematic especially when combined with his highly contextual approach to the United Nations Charter and laws of war. Two points are made: When compared to Augustine’s grappling with the disordered loves of the Roman empire—including ‘foreign iniquity’ as an excuse for military action, the animus dominandi, and wars of a kind that generate more war—In Defence of War lacks a political realism robust enough to (...)
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  12.  1
    Christianity and Human Rights.Esther D. Reed - 2011 - In Thomas Cushman (ed.), Handbook of Human Rights. Routledge. pp. 231.
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  13. The Future of Christian Social Ethics: Essays on the Work of Ronald H.Elaine L. Graham & Esther D. Reed (eds.) - 2004 - Continnum.
     
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  14. The Future of Christian Social Ethics: Essays on the Work of Ronald H. Preston, 1913-2001.Elaine L. Graham & Esther D. Reed (eds.) - 2004 - Continnum.
     
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  15. Book Review: Robin Gill, Moral Passion and Christian Ethics. [REVIEW]Esther D. Reed - 2019 - Studies in Christian Ethics 32 (3):416-417.
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