Results for 'Ethicists'

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  1.  18
    Clinical Ethicists Awakened: Addressing Two Generations of Clinical Ethics Issues Involving Undocumented Patients.Mark Kuczewski - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (4):51-57.
    Because the United States has failed to provide a pathway to citizenship for its long-term undocumented population, clinical ethicists have more than 20 years of addressing issues that arise in caring for this population. I illustrate that these challenges fall into two sets of issues. First-generation issues involve finding ethical ways to treat and discharge patients who are uninsured and ineligible for safety-net resources. More recently, ethicists have been invited to help address second-generation issues that involve facilitating the (...)
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  2.  88
    Do Ethicists Steal More Books?Eric Schwitzgebel - 2009 - Philosophical Psychology 22 (6):711-725.
    If explicit cognition about morality promotes moral behavior then one might expect ethics professors to behave particularly well. However, professional ethicists' behavior has never been empirically studied. The present research examined the rates at which ethics books are missing from leading academic libraries, compared to other philosophy books similar in age and popularity. Study 1 found that relatively obscure, contemporary ethics books of the sort likely to be borrowed mainly by professors and advanced students of philosophy were actually about (...)
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  3.  80
    The Moral Behaviour of Ethicists: Peer Opinion.Eric Schwitzgebel & J. Rust - 2009 - Mind 118 (472):1043-1059.
    If philosophical moral reflection tends to improve moral behaviour, one might expect that professional ethicists will, on average, behave morally better than non-ethicists. One potential source of insight into the moral behaviour of ethicists is philosophers' opinions about ethicists' behaviour. At the 2007 Pacific Division meeting of the American Philosophical Association, we used chocolate to entice 277 passers-by to complete anonymous questionnaires without their knowing the topic of those questionnaires in advance. Version I of the questionnaire (...)
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  4.  85
    Do Ethicists and Political Philosophers Vote More Often Than Other Professors?Eric Schwitzgebel & Joshua Rust - 2010 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 1 (2):189-199.
    If philosophical moral reflection improves moral behavior, one might expect ethics professors to behave morally better than socially similar non-ethicists. Under the assumption that forms of political engagement such as voting have moral worth, we looked at the rate at which a sample of professional ethicists—and political philosophers as a subgroup of ethicists—voted in eight years’ worth of elections. We compared ethicists’ and political philosophers’ voting rates with the voting rates of three other groups: philosophers not (...)
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  5.  17
    Why IACUCs Need Ethicists.Nathan Nobis - forthcoming - ILAR.
    Some animal research is arguably morally wrong, and some animal research is morally bad but could be improved. Who is most likely to be able to identify wrong or bad animal research and advocate for improvements? I argue that philosophical ethicists have the expertise that makes them the likely best candidates for these tasks. I review the skills, knowledge and perspectives that philosophical ethicists tend to have which makes them ethical experts. I argue that, insofar as IACUCs are (...)
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  6. Should Environmental Ethicists Fear Moral Anti-Realism?Anne Schwenkenbecher & Michael Rubin - 2019 - Environmental Values 28 (4):405-427.
    Environmental ethicists have been arguing for decades that swift action to protect our natural environment is morally paramount, and that our concern for the environment should go beyond its importance for human welfare. It might be thought that the widespread acceptance of moral anti-realism would undermine the aims of environmental ethicists. One reason is that recent empirical studies purport to show that moral realists are more likely to act on the basis of their ethical convictions than anti-realists. In (...)
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  7.  20
    Exploring a Model Role Description for Ethicists.Paula Chidwick, Jennifer Bell, Eoin Connolly, Michael D. Coughlin, Andrea Frolic, Laurie Hardingham & Randi Zlotnik Shaul - 2010 - HEC Forum 22 (1):31-40.
    This paper provides a description of the role of the clinical ethicist as it is generally experienced in Canada. It examines the activities of Canadian ethicists working in healthcare institutions and the way in which their work incorporates more than ethics case consultation. The Canadian Bioethics Society established a Taskforce on Working Conditions for Bioethics (hereafter referred to as the Taskforce), to make recommendations on a number of issues affecting ethicists and to develop a model role description. This (...)
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  8. Ethicists' Courtesy at Philosophy Conferences.Eric Schwitzgebel, Joshua Rust, Linus Ta-Lun Huang, Alan T. Moore & D. Justin Coates - 2012 - Philosophical Psychology 25 (3):331 - 340.
    If philosophical moral reflection tends to promote moral behavior, one might think that professional ethicists would behave morally better than do socially comparable non-ethicists. We examined three types of courteous and discourteous behavior at American Philosophical Association conferences: talking audibly while the speaker is talking (versus remaining silent), allowing the door to slam shut while entering or exiting mid-session (versus attempting to close the door quietly), and leaving behind clutter at the end of a session (versus leaving one's (...)
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  9.  59
    Exploring a Model Role Description for Ethicists.Paula Chidwick, Jennifer Bell, Eoin Connolly, Michael D. Coughlin, Andrea Frolic, Laurie Hardingham & Randi Zlotnik Shaul - 2010 - HEC Forum 22 (1):31-40.
    This paper provides a description of the role of the clinical ethicist as it is generally experienced in Canada. It examines the activities of Canadian ethicists working in healthcare institutions and the way in which their work incorporates more than ethics case consultation. The Canadian Bioethics Society established a “Taskforce on Working Conditions for Bioethics” (hereafter referred to as the Taskforce), to make recommendations on a number of issues affecting ethicists and to develop a model role description. This (...)
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  10.  27
    The Benefits of Practice Standards and Other Practice-Defining Texts: And Why Healthcare Ethicists Ought to Explore Them. [REVIEW]Kevin Reel - 2012 - HEC Forum 24 (3):203-217.
    This article outlines one element of the work carried out by a group of Canadian ethicists [Practicing Healthcare Ethicists Exploring Professionalization (PHEEP)]—to begin the deliberative development of a set of practice standards for the Canadian context. To provide a backdrop, this article considers the nature and purpose of practice standards as they are used by regulated professions and how they relate to other practice-defining texts such as competencies, codes of ethics and statements of scope of practice. A comparative (...)
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  11.  10
    Why Do Ethicists Eat Their Greens?Andrew Sneddon - 2020 - Philosophical Psychology 33 (7):902-923.
    Eric Schwitzgebel, Fiery Cushman, and Joshua Rust have conducted a series of studies of the thought and behavior of professional ethicists. They have found no evidence that ethical reflection yields distinctive improvements in behavior. This work has been done on English-speaking ethicists. Philipp Schönegger and Johannes Wagner replicated one study with German-speaking professors. Their results are almost the same, except for finding that German-speaking ethicists were more likely to be vegetarian than non-ethicists. The present paper devises (...)
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  12.  55
    Ethicists' and Nonethicists' Responsiveness to Student E‐Mails: Relationships Among Expressed Normative Attitude, Self‐Described Behavior, and Empirically Observed Behavior.Joshua Rust & Eric Schwitzgebel - 2013 - Metaphilosophy 44 (3):350-371.
    Do professional ethicists behave any morally better than other professors do? Do they show any greater consistency between their normative attitudes and their behavior? In response to a survey question, a large majority of professors (83 percent of ethicists, 83 percent of nonethicist philosophers, and 85 percent of nonphilosophers) expressed the view that “not consistently responding to student e-mails” is morally bad. A similarly large majority of professors claimed to respond to at least 95 percent of student e-mails. (...)
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  13. Are Medical Ethicists Out of Touch? Practitioner Attitudes in the US and UK Towards Decisions at the End of Life.Donna Dickenson - 2000 - Journal of Medical Ethics 26 (4):254-260.
    To assess whether UK and US health care professionals share the views of medical ethicists about medical futility, withdrawing/withholding treatment, ordinary/extraordinary interventions, and the doctrine of double effect. A 138-item attitudinal questionnaire completed by 469 UK nurses studying the Open University course on "Death and Dying" was compared with a similar questionnaire administered to 759 US nurses and 687 US doctors taking the Hastings Center course on "Decisions near the End of Life". Practitioners accept the relevance of concepts widely (...)
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  14.  12
    Grassroots Origins, National Engagement: Exploring the Professionalization of Practicing Healthcare Ethicists in Canada. [REVIEW]Andrea Frolic - 2012 - HEC Forum 24 (3):153-164.
    Canadian ethicists have a long legacy of leadership in advocating for standards and quality in healthcare ethics. Continuing this tradition, a grassroots organization of practicing healthcare ethicists (PHEs) concerned about the lack of standardization in the field recently formed to explore potential options related to professionalization. This group calls itself “practicing healthcare ethicists exploring professionalization” (PHEEP). This paper provides a description of the process by which PHEEP has begun to engage the Canadian PHE community in the development (...)
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  15.  42
    Case-Based Approaches to Professional Ethics: A Systematic Comparison of Students' and Ethicists' Moral Reasoning.Matthewg Keefer & Kevin D. Ashley - 2001 - Journal of Moral Education 30 (4):377-398.
    This article provides a systematic analysis of the cognitive processes required for acquiring skill in practical ethical reasoning in a professional domain. We undertook this NSF-supported research project in part to study relationships between case-based instruction in professional ethics and cognitive analyses of ethical reasoning strategies. Using a web-based experimental design, we report striking differences in the students' and ethicists' use of knowledge and reasoning. Virtually all of the ethicists and some students' protocols made significant use of specialized (...)
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  16. Sextus Empiricus: Against the Ethicists.Richard Bett (ed.) - 1996 - Clarendon Press.
    This volume contains a translation into clear modern English of an unjustly neglected work by Sextus Empiricus, together with introduction and extensive commentary. Sextus is our main source for the doctrines and arguments of ancient Scepticism; in Against the Ethicists he sets out a distinctive Sceptic position in ethics.
     
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  17.  25
    Are Medical Ethicists Out of Touch? Practitioner Attitudes in the US and UK Towards Decisions at the End of Life.D. L. Dickenson - 2000 - Journal of Medical Ethics 26 (4):254-260.
    Objectives—To assess whether UK and US health care professionals share the views of medical ethicists about medical futility, withdrawing/withholding treatment, ordinary/extraordinary interventions, and the doctrine of double effectDesign, subjects and setting–A 138-item attitudinal questionnaire completed by 469 UK nurses studying the Open University course on “Death and Dying” was compared with a similar questionnaire administered to 759 US nurses and 687 US doctors taking the Hastings Center course on “Decisions near the End of Life”.Results–Practitioners accept the relevance of concepts (...)
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  18. Moderate Ethical Realism in Sextus' Against the Ethicists?Diego E. Machuca - 2011 - In D. E. Machuca (ed.), New Essays on Ancient Pyrrhonism. Brill.
    Several scholars familiar with Sextus Empiricus’s Pyrrhonism who have attentively read his Against the Ethicists have gotten the impression that something strange is going on in this book. For, at variance with the ‘official’ Pyrrhonian attitude of universal suspension of judgment, a number of passages of Against the Ethicists seem to ascribe to the Pyrrhonist both a type of negative dogmatism and a form of realism, which together amount to what may be called ‘moderate ethical realism’. The purpose (...)
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  19.  42
    Clinical Ethicists' Perspectives on Organisational Ethics in Healthcare Organisations.D. S. Silva, J. L. Gibson, R. Sibbald, E. Connolly & P. A. Singer - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (5):320-323.
    Background: Demand for organisational ethics capacity is growing in health organisations, particularly among managers. The role of clinical ethicists in, and perspective on, organisational ethics has not been well described or documented in the literature. Objective: To describe clinical ethicists’ perspectives on organisational ethics issues in their hospitals, their institutional role in relation to organisational ethics, and their perceived effectiveness in helping to address organisational ethics issues. Design and Setting: Qualitative case study involving semi-structured interviews with 18 clinical (...)
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  20.  38
    Are Ethicists Any More Likely to Pay Their Registration Fees at Professional Meetings?Eric Schwitzgebel - 2013 - Economics and Philosophy 29 (3):371-380.
    Lists of paid registrants at Pacific Division meetings of the American Philosophical Association from 2006–2008 were compared with lists of people appearing as presenters, commentators or chairs on the meeting programme those same years. These were years in which fee payment depended primarily on an honour system rather than on enforcement. Seventy-four per cent of ethicist participants and 76% of non-ethicist participants appear to have paid their meeting registration fees: not a statistically significant difference. This finding of no difference survives (...)
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  21.  31
    Parallel, Embedded or Just Part of the Team: Ethicists Cooperating Within a European Security Research Project.A. van Gorp & S. van der Molen - 2011 - Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (1):31-43.
    Different methods have been developed to address ethical issues during research. Most of these methods were developed at universities. In this article ethical parallel research within a Research and Technology Organization is described. Within a European project about perceived security, CPSI, the ethical issues were identified by ethicists cooperating in the project. The project CPSI was aimed at developing a research method that can be used by (local) government to monitor or assess perceived and actual security. Together with the (...)
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  22.  7
    Clinical Education of Ethicists: The Role of a Clinical Ethics Fellowship.Paula Chidwick, Karen Faith, Dianne Godkin & Laurie Hardingham - 2004 - BMC Medical Ethics 5 (1):6.
    BackgroundAlthough clinical ethicists are becoming more prevalent in healthcare settings, their required training and education have not been clearly delineated. Most agree that training and education are important, but their nature and delivery remain topics of debate. One option is through completion of a clinical ethics fellowship.MethodIn this paper, the first four fellows to complete a newly developed fellowship program discuss their experiences. They describe the goals, structure, participants and activities of the fellowship. They identify key elements for succeeding (...)
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  23. Artificial Gametes: Perspectives of Geneticists, Ethicists and Representatives of Potential Users.Guido de Wert, Sjoerd Repping, Tsjalling Swierstra, Wybo Dondorp & Daniela Cutas - 2014 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 17 (3):339-345.
    Several threads of research towards developing artificial gametes are ongoing in a number of research labs worldwide. The development of a technology that could generate gametes in vitro has significant potential for human reproduction, and raises a lot of interest, as evidenced by the frequent and extensive media coverage of research in this area. We have asked researchers involved in work with artificial gametes, ethicists, and representatives of potential user groups, how they envisioned the use of artificial gametes in (...)
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  24.  64
    Advancing Neuroregenerative Medicine: A Call for Expanded Collaboration Between Scientists and Ethicists.Jocelyn Grunwell, Judy Illes & Katrina Karkazis - 2008 - Neuroethics 2 (1):13-20.
    To date, ethics discussions about stem cell research overwhelmingly have centered on the morality and acceptability of using human embryonic stem cells. Governments in many jurisdictions have now answered these “first-level questions” and many have now begun to address ethical issues related to the donation of cells, gametes, or embryos for research. In this commentary, we move beyond these ethical concerns to discuss new themes that scientists on the forefront of NRM development anticipate, providing a preliminary framework for further discussion (...)
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  25. "Przeciw Etykom" Sekstusa Empiryka (Sextus Empiricus' "Against the Ethicists").Zbigniew Nerczuk - 2003 - Studia Antyczne I Mediewistyczne 1:5-39.
    This is the introduction and the translation into Polish of the fragment from Sextus Empiricus' Against the Ethicists (AM XI, 42-167).
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  26.  20
    Medical Ethicists, Human Curiosities, and the New Media Midway.Steven H. Miles - 2004 - American Journal of Bioethics 4 (3):39 – 43.
    Medical ethicists have assumed a role in justifying public voyeurism of human "curiosities." This role has precedent in how scientists and natural philosophers once legitimized the marketing of museums of "human curiosities." At the beginning of the twentieth century, physicians dissociated themselves from entrepreneurial displays of persons with anomalies, and such commercial exhibits went into decline. Today, news media, principally on television, promote news features about persons that closely resemble the nineteenth century exhibits of human curiosities. Reporters solicit medical (...)
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  27.  37
    Designing Ethicists.Michael C. Brannigan - 1996 - Health Care Analysis 4 (3):206-218.
    In the United States, disturbing concerns pertaining to both how putative bioethicists are perceived and the potential for the abuse of their power in connection with these perceptions compel close examination. This paper addresses these caveats by examining two fundamental and interrelated components in the image-construction of the ethicist: definitional and contextual. Definitional features reveal that perceptions and images of the ethicist are especially subject to distortion due to a lack of clarity as to the nature and qualifications of the (...)
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  28. Baby Marrow: Ethicists and Privacy.A. Zucker - 1992 - Journal of Medical Ethics 18 (3):125-141.
    A family had a child in large part to use its marrow in the hopes of saving the life of an older child afflicted with leukaemia. Public response from medical ethicists was negative. This paper argues that what the family did was not clearly wrong and that the ethicists should not have made public pronouncements calling the morals of the family into question.
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  29.  19
    The Bioethics Tabloids: How Professional Ethicists Have Fallen for the Myth of Tertiary Transmitted Heterosexual AIDS. [REVIEW]Udo Schüklenk, David Mertz & Juliet Richters - 1995 - Health Care Analysis 3 (1):27-36.
    The hysteria and misconceptions about AIDS which are fostered and held by the popular press have been accepted uncritically by many bioethicists, who have not bothered to explore popular empirical claims in sufficient depth. As a result, and because ethicists attempt tosell moral problems in a manner not much different from the way the popular press attempt tosell newspapers, artificial dilemmas have been produced in professional journals. We concentrate on just one popular misconception about AIDS-that the hetersexual incidence of (...)
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  30.  17
    Professional Liability (Malpractice) Coverage of Humanist Scholars Functioning as Clinical Medical Ethicists.Donnie J. Self & Joy D. Skeel - 1988 - Journal of Medical Humanities and Bioethics 9 (2):101-110.
    In contrast to theoretical discussions about potential professional liability of clinical ethicists, this report gives the results of empirical data gathered in a national survey of clinical medical ethicists. The report assesses the types of activities of clinical ethicists, the extent and types of their professional liability coverage, and the influence that concerns about legal liability has on how they function as clinical ethicists. In addition demographic data on age, sex, educational background, etc. are reported. The (...)
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  31. A Study of the Foundations of Ethical Decision Making of Clinical Medical Ethicists.Donnie J. Self & Joy D. Skeel - 1991 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 12 (2).
    A study of clinical medical ethicists was conducted to determine the various philosophical positions they hold with respect to ethical decision making in medicine and their various positions' relationship to the subjective-objective controversy in value theory. The study consisted of analyzing and interpreting data gathered from questionnaires from 52 clinical medical ethicists at 28 major health care centers in the United States. The study revealed that most clinical medical ethicists tend to be objectivists in value theory, i.e., (...)
     
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  32.  13
    Why Are There No Clinical Ethicists in France?Jean-Christophe Mino - 2001 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 10 (3):341-344.
    As part of a research project, sponsored by the French Ministry of Health, comparing the role and function of French hospital ethics committees as compared to those in the United States, I was intrigued by differences that emerged. Particularly, why should it be that professional ethicists, such prominent figures in America, have no counterpart in France?
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  33.  32
    Ethics and Ethicists in the Modern Context.Wan Junren & Yan Xin - 2009 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (2):227 - 237.
    Ethics in the modern context is under the dual pressure of scientific-technological rationality and market commercialization, which has led to breakthroughs in the original boundaries of knowledge and academic methodology. The gradual separation of the domain of public life and that of private life in modern society and the former's increasing pressure on the latter, in addition to the above dual pressure on ethics, is causing a dramatic transformation of the structure of ethical knowledge itself. All of these raise new (...)
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  34.  35
    Ethicists Conscientiously Objecting: An Ontological Dejustification.M. A. Kekewich & T. C. Foreman - 2012 - Clinical Ethics 7 (2):101-104.
    Much has been written about the rights of health-care professionals to conscientiously object. Ironically, there has been no formal discussion as to whether clinical ethicists have the same right. Given that ethicists routinely deal with the same situations and questions that other health-care professionals find morally discomforting, the question as to whether they have the same right is a critical one. We conclude that ethicists should not have the same right to conscientious objection. The role of an (...)
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  35.  45
    Ethics and Ethicists in the Modern Context.Junren Wan - 2009 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (2):227-237.
    Ethics in the modern context is under the dual pressure of scientific-technological rationality and market commercialization, which has led to breakthroughs in the original boundaries of knowledge and academic methodology. The gradual separation of the domain of public life and that of private life in modern society and the former’s increasing pressure on the latter, in addition to the above dual pressure on ethics, is causing a dramatic transformation of the structure of ethical knowledge itself. All of these raise new (...)
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  36.  12
    The Profession and the Killer App, or What Environmental Ethicists Might Learn From Bioethics: A Commentary.Per Sandin - 2015 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 18 (3):275-282.
    In terms of output in the form of published work and attraction of resources, bioethics seems to be a more vibrant field than environmental ethics. In this commentary it is argued that bioethics is, in some respect, less humanistic than environmental ethics and that two factors––bioethics’ strong connection to a profession, and its access to an intellectual ‘killer app’––offer ways in which environmental ethicists might learn from the ‘success story’ of bioethics.
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  37.  16
    Against the Ethicists (Adversus Mathematicos XI).Susan Dimock - 1998 - Review of Metaphysics 52 (1):177-180.
    Sextus Empiricus was a Pyrrhonist skeptic. Although his dates and many of the details of his life are uncertain, he probably lived in the second century A.D. Our knowledge of his philosophical skepticism is drawn primarily from a series of skeptical treatises which have survived, usually titled in English, Outlines of Pyrrhonism, Against the Logicians, Against the Physicists, Against the Learned, and Against the Ethicists. These works are invaluable, not only for the insights which they provide into Pyrrhonism, but (...)
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  38.  15
    Academic Freedom and the Professional Responsibilities of Applied Ethicists: A Comment on Minerva.Angus Dawson & Jonathan Herington - 2014 - Bioethics 28 (4):174-177.
    Academic freedom is an important good, but it comes with several responsibilities. In this commentary we seek to do two things. First, we argue against Francesca Minerva's view of academic freedom as presented in her article ‘New threats to academic freedom’ on a number of grounds. We reject the nature of the absolutist moral claim to free speech for academics implicit in the article; we reject the elitist role for academics as truth-seekers explicit in her view; and we reject a (...)
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  39.  14
    Ethicists and Health Care Reform: An Indecent Proposal?Laurence J. O'Connell - 1994 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 19 (5):419-424.
    The Clinton Administration stated that the list of values and moral principles generated by the Ethics group reflects "fundamental national beliefs about community, equality, and liberty" and that "these convictions anchor health reform in shared moral traditions." However, these statements are difficult to justify. There is not a moral consensus in America that would justify thorough-going health care reform. In such a context of pluralism, ethicists should seek to move society in the direction of solidarity. The participation of (...) on the Clinton Task Force was valuable because it showed that health reform is an exercise in social ethics, disseminated the work of ethicists to the entire Task Force, and expanded the experience of the ethicists involved. It may also have accelerated the moral transformation of Americans, which is needed before radical reform can take place. Keywords: American values, Clinton health plan, health care reform CiteULike Connotea Del.icio.us What's this? (shrink)
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  40.  9
    Deliberative Clinical Ethics: Getting Back to Basics in the Work of Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethicists.Laurence B. McCullough - 2014 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 39 (1):1-7.
    The six papers in the 2014 clinical ethics number of the Journal get us back to the basics in the work of clinical ethics and clinical ethicists: getting clear about concepts that should be used in achieving deliberative clinical ethics. The papers explore the concepts of the best interests of the patient, health and disease understood in their proper relationship to autonomy in our species, the therapeutic obligation, and the therapeutic imperative. The final paper appraises the systematic review, a (...)
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  41.  7
    The Social Psychology of Amateur Ethicists: Blood Product Recall Notification and the Value of Reflexivity.J. A. Wasserman & L. S. Dure - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (7):530-533.
    The purpose of this article is to highlight ways in which institutional policymakers tend to insufficiently conceptualise their role as ethics practitioners. We use the case of blood product recall notification as a means of raising questions about the way in which, as we have observed it, discourse for those who make institutional ethics policies is constrained by routine balancing of simplified principles to the exclusion of reflexive practices—those that turn ethics reasoning back on itself. The latter allows ethics practitioners (...)
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  42.  5
    Honoring American Nurse Ethicists.Winifred J. Ellenchild Pinch - 2009 - Nursing Ethics 16 (2):238-247.
    A project featuring scholars in nursing ethics was planned in 2005. The goal was to document the contributions of some 24 selected American nurse ethicists to bioethics, and to discuss and explore the future trajectory of that work through a two-day working seminar. This article outlines the beginnings of bioethics in the USA and the specific contribution of nurse scholars to the debate, the preparation for the seminar, the results of the project, and the possible application of such a (...)
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  43. What's Wrong?: Applied Ethicists and Their Critics.David Boonin & Graham Oddie (eds.) - 2004 - Oxford University Press.
    What's Wrong?: Applied Ethicists and Their Critics is a thorough and engaging introduction to applied ethics that covers virtually all of the issues in the field. Featuring more than ninety-five articles, it addresses standard topics--such as abortion, euthanasia, capital punishment, world hunger, and animal rights--and also delves into cutting-edge areas like cloning, racial profiling, same-sex marriage, prostitution, and slave reparations. The volume includes seminal essays by prominent philosophers (Robert Nozick, James Rachels, Peter Singer, and Judith Jarvis Thomson) alongside work (...)
     
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  44. Sextus Empiricus: Against the Ethicists.Sextus Empiricus - 1996 - Oxford University Press UK.
    About Sextus Sextus Empiricus is one of the most important ancient philosophical writers after Plato and Aristotle. His writings are our main source for the doctrines and arguments of Scepticism. He probably lived in the second century AD. Eleven books of his writings have survived, covering logic, physics, ethics, and numerous more specialized fields. About Against the Ethicists In this unjustly neglected and misunderstood work Sextus sets out a distinctive Sceptic position in ethics. He discusses the concepts good and (...)
     
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  45. Sekstus Empiryk, Przeciw fizykom. Przeciw etykom (Translation, introduction and commentary to Sextus Empiricus, Against the physicists. Against the ethicists).Zbigniew Nerczuk - 2010 - Wydawnictwo Marek Derewiecki.
    Polish translation, introduction and commentary to Sextus Empiricus, Against the physicists. Against the ethicists.
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  46.  28
    Against the Ethicists: (Adversus Mathematicos Xi). Sextus - 1997 - Oxford University Press, Usa.
    This volume contains a new translation of Against the Ethicists, together with an introduction and extensive commentary. Those who have discussed this work in the past have tended to underestimate it, regarding its main position as essentially the same as that of Sextus's better-known Outlines of Pyrrhonism, Richard Bett shows that this text proposes a distinct and previously unnoticed philosophical outlook, associated with a phase of Pyrrhonian Scepticism predating Sextus himself.
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  47. Sextus Empiricus: Against the Ethicists.Sextus Empiricus (ed.) - 2000 - Clarendon Press.
    This volume contains a translation into clear modern English of an unjustly neglected work by Sextus Empiricus, together with introduction and extensive commentary. Sextus is our main source for the doctrines and arguments of ancient Scepticism; in Against the Ethicists he sets out a distinctive Sceptic position in ethics.
     
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  48. Clinical Ethicists: Consultants or Professionals?William Winslade - 2014 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 25:36-40.
    John H. Evans’s views on the multiple roles of healthcare ethics consultants are based on his claim that bioethics is a "distinct profession" that has a "system of abstract knowledge." This response to Professor Evans disputes both of his claims. It is argued that clinical ethicists are consultants but not professionals. Their roles as consultants require more than one abstract form of knowledge . Instead, clinical ethicists rely upon a variety of ethical perspectives and other skills to help (...)
     
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  49.  32
    A Prima Facie Duty Approach to Machine Ethics Machine Learning of Features of Ethical Dilemmas, Prima Facie Duties, and Decision Principles Through a Dialogue with Ethicists.Susan Leigh Anderson & Michael Anderson - 2011 - In M. Anderson S. Anderson (ed.), Machine Ethics. Cambridge Univ. Press.
  50. Ethical Theory and the Problem of Inconsequentialism: Why Environmental Ethicists Should Be Virtue-Oriented Ethicists[REVIEW]Ronald Sandler - 2009 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 23 (1-2):167-183.
    Many environmental problems are longitudinal collective action problems. They arise from the cumulative unintended effects of a vast amount of seemingly insignificant decisions and actions by individuals who are unknown to each other and distant from each other. Such problems are likely to be effectively addressed only by an enormous number of individuals each making a nearly insignificant contribution to resolving them. However, when a person’s making such a contribution appears to require sacrifice or costs, the problem of inconsequentialism arises: (...)
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