Results for 'Eudaimonia'

352 found
Order:
See also
  1.  49
    Aristotle on Eudaimonia.J. L. Ackrill - 1975 - Oxford University Press.
  2.  75
    Happiness, Eudaimonia, and The Principle of Descriptive Adequacy.Matthew Cashen - 2012 - Metaphilosophy 43 (5):619-635.
    Historically, philosophers have identified happiness with, among other things, pleasure, contentment, desire satisfaction, and, if we count the Greek eudaimonia as happiness, the life of virtue. When faced with competing theories of happiness, we need a way to decide which theory is more accurate. According to Larry Wayne Sumner's principle of descriptive adequacy, the best theory of happiness is the theory that best describes our ordinary, pretheoretical beliefs and intuitions. The chief aim of this article is to show that (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  3. Tracking Eudaimonia.Paul Bloomfield - 2018 - Philosophy, Theory, and Practice in Biology 10 (2).
    A basic challenge to naturalistic moral realism is that, even if moral properties existed, there would be no way to naturalistically represent or track them. Here, the basic structure for a tracking account of moral epistemology is given in empirically respectable terms, based on a eudaimonist conception of morality. The goal is to show how this form of moral realism can be seen as consistent with the details of evolutionary biology as well as being amenable to the most current understanding (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  4. Eudaimonia in Contemporary Virtue Ethics.Anne Baril - 2014 - In Stan van Hooft (ed.), The Handbook of Virtue Ethics. Acumen Publishing. pp. 17-27.
  5. Eudaimonia, External Results, and Choosing Virtuous Actions for Themselves.Jennifer Whiting - 2002 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 65 (2):270-290.
    Aristotle's requirement that virtuous actions be chosen for themselves is typically interpreted, in Kantian terms, as taking virtuous action to have intrinsic rather than consequentialist value. This raises problems about how to reconcile Aristotle's requirement with (a) the fact that virtuous actions typically aim at ends beyond themselves (usually benefits to others); and (b) Aristotle's apparent requirement that everything (including virtuous action) be chosen for the sake of eudaimonia. I offer an alternative interpretation, based on Aristotle's account of loving (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  6. Eudaimonia and Neltiliztli: Aristotle and the Aztecs on the Good Life.Lynn Sebastian Purcell - 2017 - APA Newsletter on Hispanic/Latino Issues in Philosophy 16 (2):10-21.
    This essay takes a first step in comparative ethics by looking to Aristotle and the Aztec's conceptions of the good life. It argues that the Aztec conception of a rooted life, neltiliztli, functions for ethical purposes in a way that is like Aristotle's eudaimonia. To develop this claim, it not only shows just in what their conceptions of the good consist, but also in what way the Aztecs conceived of the virtues (in qualli, in yectli).
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  7. Aristotle on Eudaimonia.J. L. Ackrill - 1974 - In Amélie Oksenberg Rorty (ed.), Essays on Aristotle's Ethics. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press. pp. 15-34.
    Originally published in Proceedings of the British Academy 60 (1974), 339-359.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   99 citations  
  8. Eudaimonia and Self-Sufficiency in the Nicomachean Ethics.Robert Heinaman - 1988 - Phronesis 33 (1):31-53.
  9.  17
    Eudaimonia and well-being: questioning the moral authority of advance directives in dementia.Philippa Byers - 2020 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 41 (1):23-37.
    This paper revisits Ronald Dworkin’s influential position that a person’s advance directive for future health care and medical treatment retains its moral authority beyond the onset of dementia, even when respecting this authority involves foreshortening the life of someone who is happy and content and who no longer remembers or identifies with instructions included within the advance directive. The analysis distils a eudaimonist perspective from Dworkin’s argument and traces variations of this perspective in further arguments for the moral authority of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  10.  14
    Eudaimonia, External Results, and Choosing Virtuous Actions for Themselves.Jennifer Whiting - 2002 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 65 (2):270-290.
    Aristotle’s requirement that virtuous actions be chosen for themselves is typically interpreted, in Kantian terms, as taking virtuous action to have intrinsic rather than consequentialist value. This raises problems about how to reconcile Aristotle’s requirement with the fact that virtuous actions typically aim at ends beyond themselves ; and Aristotle’s apparent requirement that everything be chosen for the sake of eudaimonia. I offer an alternative interpretation, based on Aristotle’s account of loving a friend for herself, according to which choosing (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  11.  10
    In Pursuit of Eudaimonia: How Virtue Ethics Captures the Self-Understandings and Roles of Corporate Directors.Patricia Grant, Surendra Arjoon & Peter McGhee - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 153 (2):389-406.
    A recent special issue in the Journal of Business Ethics gathered together a variety of papers addressing the challenges of putting virtue ethics into practice :563–565, 2013). The editors prefaced their outline of the various papers with the assertion that exploring the practical dimension of virtue ethics can help business leaders discover their proper place in working for a better world, as individuals and within the family, the business community and society in general :563–565, 2013). Scholars are yet to explore (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  12.  34
    Eudaimonia, Happiness, and the Redemption of Unhappiness.Timothy Chappell - 2013 - Philosophical Topics 41 (1):27-52.
    In this paper I argue for five theses. The first thesis is that ethicists should think about happiness and unhappiness together, with as much detail and particularity as possible. Thinking about unhappiness will help us get clear about happiness, and distinguish the different things that come under that name. The second is that happiness and unhappiness can both be important positively valuable features of a worthwhile life. The third thesis is that Modern Eudaimonism, the claim that every reason to act (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  13. Rationality, Eudaimonia and Kakodaimonia in Aristotle.Robert Heinaman - 1993 - Phronesis 38 (1):31-56.
    I argue that Aristotle does not believe all rational action aims at securing eudaimonia (happiness) for the agent. Intrinsic goods are worth having independently of their promotion of any further ends, including eudaimonia. Aiming for such a good or avoiding evil may be rational even when eudaimonia is impossible and not the agent's goal. "Politics" 1332a7f suggests that even the happy agent may act rationally without aiming for eudaimonia. The final section argues that, given that an (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  14.  24
    Christianity and Eudaimonia, Luck and Eudaimonism.Frederick V. Simmons - 2019 - Journal of Religious Ethics 47 (1):43-67.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  15. The Role of Eudaimonia in Aristotle's Ethics'.John McDowell - 1980 - In Amélie Oksenberg Rorty (ed.), Essays on Aristotle's Ethics. University of California Press. pp. 359--76.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   41 citations  
  16. Eudaimonia as an Activity in Nicomachean Ethics 1. 8–12.Robert Heinaman - 2007 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 33:221-253.
  17.  54
    Eudaimonia and Agape in Macintyre and Kierkegaard's Works of Love.Matthew D. Mendham - 2007 - Journal of Religious Ethics 35 (4):591-625.
    This essay explores connections and divergences between Alasdair MacIntyre's eudaimonistic ethic and Søren Kierkegaard's agapeistic ethic--perhaps the greatest proponents of these ethical paradigms from the past two centuries. The purpose of the work is threefold. First, to demonstrate an impressive amount of convergence and complementarity in their approaches to the transcendent grounds of an ethic of flourishing, the rigors necessary for a proper self-love, and the other-directed nature of proper social relations. Second, given the inapplicability of common dichotomies, to pinpoint (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  18. Euthanasia and Eudaimonia.David Shaw - 2009 - Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (9):530-533.
    This paper re-evaluates euthanasia and assisted suicide from the perspective of eudaimonia, the ancient Greek conception of happiness across one’s whole life. It is argued that one cannot be said to have fully flourished or had a truly happy life if one’s death is preceded by a period of unbearable pain or suffering that one cannot avoid without assistance in ending one’s life. While death is to be accepted as part of life, it should not be left to nature (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  19.  2
    Untangling Fear and Eudaimonia in the Healthcare Provider-Patient Relationship.Brenda Bogaert - 2020 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 23 (3):457-469.
    Ensuring patient participation in healthcare decision making remains a difficult task. Factors such as a lack of time in the consultation, medical objectivation, or the difficulties of translating individual patient experience into the treatment plan have been shown to limit patient contributions. Little research attention has focused however on how emotions experienced by both the patient and the healthcare provider may affect the ability of the patient to participate. In this research, patient’s and healthcare provider’s emotions were identified and analysed. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  20. From Happiness to Blessedness: Husserl on Eudaimonia, Virtue, and the Best Life.Marco Cavallaro & George Heffernan - 2019 - HORIZON. Studies in Phenomenology 8 (2):353-388.
    This paper treats of Husserl’s phenomenology of happiness or eudaimonia in five parts. In the first part, we argue that phenomenology of happiness is an important albeit relatively neglected area of research, and we show that Husserl engages in it. In the second part, we examine the relationship between phenomenological ethics and virtue ethics. In the third part, we identify and clarify essential aspects of Husserl’s phenomenology of happiness, namely, the nature of the question concerning happiness and the possibility (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  21. Aristotle on Eudaimonia.Thomas Nagel - 1972 - Phronesis 17 (3):252 - 259.
  22.  58
    Ergon and Eudaimonia in Nicomachean Ethics I: Reconsidering the Intellectualist Interpretation.Timothy Dean Roche - 1988 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 26 (2):175-194.
  23.  34
    Self-Responsibility and Eudaimonia.J. Drummond - 2010 - In Carlo Ierna, Hanne Jaccobs & Filip Mattens (eds.), PHILOSOPHY PHENOMENOLOGY SCIENCES. Springer. pp. 441--460.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  24. Back to Aristotle? Happiness, Eudaimonia and Relational Goods.Luigino Bruni - 2008 - In Luigino Bruni, Flavio Comim & Maurizio Pugno (eds.), Capabilities and Happiness. Oxford University Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  25. Ataraxia and Eudaimonia in Ancient Pyrrhonism: Is the Skeptic Really Happy?Mark McPherran - 1989 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 5:135-171.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  26.  62
    Well-Being and Eudaimonia.Mark LeBar & Daniel Russell - 2013 - In Julia Peters (ed.), Aristotelian Ethics in Contemporary Perspective. Routledge. pp. 52.
    Daniel Haybron’s recent book, The Pursuit of Unhappiness, includes a defense of a normative notion of well-being. Haybron’s main contribution is to argue that a central component of well-being is the fulfillment of one’s “emotional nature,” that is, fulfillment as a unique individual who is such as to find happiness in some things rather than others. We argue that the contrast he draws between his view and “Aristotelian” views of well-being is problematic in two ways. First, Haybron says that unlike (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  27.  2
    « L’eudaimonia Des Gardiens Philosophes ».Aikaterini Lefka - 2011 - Plato Journal 11.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28.  45
    Count No One Happy: Eudaimonia and Positive Psychology.Robert L. Woolfolk & Rachel H. Wasserman - 2005 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 25 (1):81-90.
    Some aspects of "second-generation" Positive Psychology are analyzed and their origins explored. In particular, Seligman's importation of the concept of eudaimonia from Aristotelian ethics is critiqued and found to be problematic. This conclusion is reached through an examination of the concept of eudaimonia as it was employed in ancient philosophy. 2012 APA, all rights reserved).
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  29. Egoism and Eudaimonia-Maximization in the Nicomachean Ethics.Erik Wielenberg - 2004 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 26:277-95.
  30.  34
    Aristotle on Eudaimonia.Jerome Moran - 2018 - Think 17 (48):91-99.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  31.  9
    Eudaimonia as Fundamentally Good.Mark LeBar - 2020 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 97 (3):386-400.
    In the ethical theories of the ancient Greeks, eudaimonia provided a grounding for the value of all other goods. But a puzzle for such views is that some things are good for us irrespective of the intervention of eudaimonia and its requirement of virtuous activity. In this article, the author considers challenges to the eudaimonist account of value on those grounds pressed by Nicholas Wolterstorff and Sophie Grace Chappell. The aim is ethical-theoretical, rather than historical. The author defends (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32.  26
    Sophia, Eutuchia and Eudaimonia in the Euthydemus.Don Adams - 2014 - Apeiron 47 (1):1-33.
    Name der Zeitschrift: Apeiron Jahrgang: 47 Heft: 1 Seiten: 48-80.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  33.  36
    Plotinus on Eudaimonia: A Commentary on Ennead I.4.Kieran McGroarty - 2006 - Oxford University Press.
    In this volume, Kieran McGroarty provides a philosophical commentary on a section of the Enneads written by the last great Neoplatonist thinker, Plotinus. The treatise is entitled "Concerning Well-Being" and was written at a late stage in Plotinus' life when he was suffering from an illness that was shortly to kill him. Its main concern is with the good man and how he should pursue the good life. The treatise is therefore central to our understanding of Plotinus' ethical theory, and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  34.  51
    Political Participation and Eudaimonia in Aristotle's Politics.T. Duvall - 1998 - History of Political Thought 19 (1):21-34.
    Current debates surrounding Aristotle's Politics involve attempts to explain the role of political participation in the pursuit of Aristotle's human telos, eudaimonia. Many argue that political participation is crucial to eudaimonia, equating the good man with the good citizen. Often this argument is based on Aristotle's labelling of humans as zoon politikon, or ‘political animal’, and the misleading translation of eudaimonia as ‘happiness’. We provide supported explanations of eudaimonia and zoon politikon which do not force us (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  35.  60
    Aristotle on Akrasia, Eudaimonia, and the Psychology of Action.Alfred R. Mele - 1985 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 2 (4):375 - 393.
    ALTHOUGH Aristotle's work on akrasia has prompted numerous competing interpretations, at least one point seems clear: incontinent action is, for him, dependent upon some deficiency in the agent's cognitive condition at the time of action. But why, exactly, did he take this view? This question, my central concern in the present paper, is not just a query about Aristotle's understanding of incontinent action. It leads us at once into a tangled web of questions about his conception of human action and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  36. Aristotle on Eudaimonia in Nicomachean Ethics.Geert Van Cleemput - 2006 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 30:127-57.
  37.  41
    Sport Hunting, Eudaimonia, and Tragic Wisdom.James A. Tantillo - 2001 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 8 (2):101-112.
    Anti-hunters frequently overlook or underestimate the positive values associated with reflective sport hunting. In this essay I characterize the value of hunting in the context of an Aristotelian virtue ethic. Sport hunting done for the purpose of recreation contributes heavily to the eudaimonia (flourishing) of hunters. I employ Aristotelian insights about tragedy to defend hunting as an activity especially well-suited for promoting a range of crucial intellectual and emotional virtues. Reflective sport hunters develop a “realistic awareness of death” and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  38. Eudaimonia.Valerie Tiberius & Michelle Mason - 2009 - In Shane J. Lopez (ed.), The Encyclopedia of Positive Psychology. Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 1--351.
  39.  65
    Is Aristotelian Eudaimonia Happiness?J. C. Dybikowski - 1981 - Dialogue 20 (2):185-200.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  40. Eudaimonia y teología en Epicteto.Rodrigo Sebastián Braicovich - 2011 - Revista de Filosofía (México) 43 (131):135-150.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. Eudaimonia E o Problema Das Ações Virtuosas Em Aristóteles.Thaís Cristina Alves Costa - 2014 - Griot : Revista de Filosofia 10 (2):164-172.
    A partir de uma análise crítica do conceito de eudaimonia aristotélica, almeja-se compreender qual é o fim aos quais todas as nossas ações tendem e como podemos alcançá-lo. Para isso, utilizar-se-á como fio condutor desta pesquisa a analise do livro I da obra Ética a Nicômaco de Aristóteles, delineando os elementos que permeiam o problema da ação virtuosa, tais como o conceito de virtude, felicidade e alma.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42.  31
    "Eudaimonia" in Aristotle's "Rhetoric".Marcus H. Worner - forthcoming - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy.
    The discussion of "eudaimonia" in the "rhetoric" has a central place in Aristotle's exposition of the material for speeches deliberative, epideictic and forensic varieties of rhetoric. Due to the telos- relatedness of the material for each variety of rhetoric, the treatise on "eudaimonia" (Rhet A5) provides coherence between the varieties by displaying standards in terms of which particular cases at hand are ultimately assessed as good, useful, noble, just or their opposites. A focal and normative meaning of (...) can be identified in A5 which Aristotle expects a prudent orator to maintain even when he is faced with perverted audiences. (shrink)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43.  46
    Aristotle on "Eudaimonia": After Plato's "Republic".Jiyuan Yu - 2001 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 18 (2):115 - 138.
  44. The Relevance of Aristotle’s Conception of Eudaimonia for the Psychological Study of Happiness.Alan S. Waterman - 1990 - Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 10 (1):39-44.
    According to the ethical system of eudaimonism, a philosophy that predates Aristotle, individuals have a responsibility to recognize and live in accordance with their daimon or "true self." The daimon refers to the potentialities of each person, the realization of which represents the greatest fulfillment in living of which each is capable. The daimon is an ideal in the sense of being an excellence, a perfection toward which one strives and, hence, it can give meaning and direction to one's life. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  45.  27
    "Eudaimonia" and the Pain-Displeasure Contingency Argument.David L. Norton - 1972 - Ethics 82 (4):314-320.
  46.  49
    Should Eudaimonia Structure Professional Virtue?Andreas Eriksen - 2016 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 50 (4):605-618.
    This article develops a eudaimonistic account of professional virtue. Using the case of teaching, the article argues that professional virtue requires that role holders care about the ends of their work. Care is understood in terms of an investment of the self. Virtuous role holders are invested in their practice in a way that makes professional excellence part of their own good. Failure to care about the ends of professional practice reveals a lack of appreciation of the value of professional (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47. Aristotle on Eudaimonia in Nicomachean Ethics I.Geert van Cleemput - 2006 - In David Sedley (ed.), Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy Xxx: Summer 2006. Oxford University Press.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  48.  8
    Eudaimonía y Destino.Rafael Corazón González - 2000 - Studia Poliana 2:165-189.
    Almost all the classical theories on ethics place man's objective as his search for happiness. This ideal is based on nature. Medieval thinkers, considering man as a person, came to the conclusion that he is called to a transcendental destiny; however, because they continued to use the classical ideal of happiness as a concenptual model, they created quite a few difficulties: self-transcendence and self-fulfillment are opposing models. L. Polo, on the other hand, proposes a non-naturalist anthropology that considers each person (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49. A Eudaimonia No Livro I da Ética a Nicómaco.Nuno P. Castanheira - 2005 - Philosophica 26:99--127.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50. Communism as Eudaimonia.Sabeen Ahmed - 2018 - International Journal of Philosophy and Social Values 1 (2):31-48.
    Karl Marx states in Capital that “man, if not as Aristotle thought a political animal, is at all events a social animal” (Marx, 1992, 444). That Marx draws from Aristotle’s work has been long-recognized, but one could argue that Marx’s very conception of man—what he calls “species-being”—is a derivative of Aristotle’s theory of the good life. This article explores the Aristotelian underpinnings of Marx’s political philosophy and argues that Marx’s theory of species-being and human emancipation supervenes upon Aristotle’s theory of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 352