Results for 'Eugenio E. Benitez'

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  1.  50
    The Good or The Demiurge: Causation and the Unity of Good in Plato.Eugenio E. Benitez - 1995 - Apeiron 28 (2):113 - 140.
    In Republic VI 508e-9b Plato has Socrates claim that the Good is the cause (αίτίαν) of truth and knowledge as well as the very being of the Forms. Consequently, as causes must be distinct from and superior to their effects, the Good is neither truth nor knowledge nor even being, but exceeds them all in beauty (509a), as well as in honour and power (509b). No other passage in Plato has had a more intoxicating effect on its readers. To take (...)
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  2.  41
    The Mythical Voice in the Timaeus-Critias: Stylometric Indicators.Harold Tarrant, Eugenio E. Benitez & Terry Roberts - 2011 - Ancient Philosophy 31 (1):95-120.
    This article presents evidence over which we stumbled while investigating a completely different part of the Platonic Corpus. While examining the ordinary working vocabulary of the doubtful dialogues and of those undisputed dialogues most readily compared with them, it seemed essential to have a representative sample of Plato's allegedly 'middle' and 'late' dialogues also. The real surprise came when the Critias was included, showing some frequencies not previously observed in Platonic dialogues. This prompted treatment of the Timaeus also, some of (...)
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  3. Sofisti e Socrati.Rick Benitez - 2012 - In Lorenzo Perilli & Daniela Taormina (eds.), Manuale di storia della filosofia antica. Turin: UTET. pp. 170-93.
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  4.  47
    Ancient Ethics.Eugenio Benitez - 2004 - The Classical Review 54 (2):430-432.
  5. Who Speaks for Plato?: Studies in Platonic Anonymity.Hayden W. Ausland, Eugenio Benitez, Ruby Blondell, Lloyd P. Gerson, Francisco J. Gonzalez, J. J. Mulhern, Debra Nails, Erik Ostenfeld, Gerald A. Press, Gary Alan Scott, P. Christopher Smith, Harold Tarrant, Holger Thesleff, Joanne Waugh, William A. Welton & Elinor J. M. West - 2000 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    In this international and interdisciplinary collection of critical essays, distinguished contributors examine a crucial premise of traditional readings of Plato's dialogues: that Plato's own doctrines and arguments can be read off the statements made in the dialogues by Socrates and other leading characters. The authors argue in general and with reference to specific dialogues, that no character should be taken to be Plato's mouthpiece. This is essential reading for students and scholars of Plato.
     
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  6.  36
    The Birth of Rhetoric: Gorgias, Plato and Their SuccessorsRobert Wardy Issues in Ancient Philosophy New York: Routledge, 1996, Viii + 197 Pp., $76.95. [REVIEW]Eugenio Benitez - 1999 - Dialogue 38 (4):901-904.
  7.  46
    Philosophy as Performed in Plato's "Theaetetus".Eugenio Benitez & Livia Guimaraes - 1993 - Review of Metaphysics 47 (2):297 - 328.
    We examine the "Theaetetus" in the light of its juxtaposition of philosophical, mathematical and sophistical approaches to knowledge, which we show to be a prominent feature of the drama. We suggest that clarifying the nature of philosophy supersedes the question of knowledge as the main ambition of the "Theaetetus". Socrates shows Theaetetus that philosophy is not a demonstrative science, like geometry, but it is also not mere word-play, like sophistry. The nature of philosophy is revealed in Socrates' activity of examination (...)
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  8.  34
    Argument, Rhetoric, and Philosophic Method: Plato's "Protagoras".Eugenio Benitez - 1992 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 25 (3):222 - 252.
    The greatest rhetorical display (έπιδείξις) of Plato's Protagoras is apparently not Protagoras's famous myth cum démonstration1 about the teachability of excellence (αρετή),2 but rather the dia logue as a whole. The Protagoras exposes key différences between the methods and presuppositions of Socrates and those of the Sophists - thus defending Socrates against the charge of being a Sophist himself - and in so doing clarifies the conditions and princi ples of ethical argumentation.3 The display of the Protagoras oc curs on (...)
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  9.  25
    Plato’s Parmenides. [REVIEW]Eugenio Benitez - 1993 - Ancient Philosophy 13 (2):410-413.
  10.  6
    Pleasure, Knowledge, and Being: An Analysis of Plato's Philebus. [REVIEW]E. E. Benitez - 1991 - Review of Metaphysics 45 (2):401-403.
    Hampton's interpretation of the Philebus attempts to reveal the underlying unity of the dialogue's ethical, ontological, and epistemological arguments while locating them in the more general context of Plato's other works, particularly the Republic. At the same time Hampton resists the temptation to illuminate the Philebus by means of sources external to Plato, including Aristotle and the Neoplatonists, though some of this evidence receives treatment in the appendix. Hampton's most original arguments are to be found in her discussions of the (...)
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  11.  30
    Philosophy, Myth and Plato's Two-Worlds View.Eugenio Benitez - 2007 - The European Legacy 12 (2):225-242.
    This paper examines one aspect of the relation between philosophy and myth, namely the function myth has, for some philosophers, in narrowing the distance between appearance and reality. I distinguish this function of myth from other common functions, and also show how the approach to reality through myth differs from a more empirical philosophical approach. I argue that myth plays a fundamental role in Plato's approach to the appearance/reality distinction, and that understanding this is important to the interpretation of Plato's (...)
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  12.  5
    Parmenides: Being, Bounds, and Logic. [REVIEW]E. E. Benitez - 1987 - Review of Metaphysics 40 (3):562-563.
    This book is a significant addition to studies of Parmenides and the foundation of Greek philosophy, with interesting implications for subsequent Western metaphysics. Within carefully drawn limits, Austin conducts a rigorous analysis of Parmenides' poem that is both creative and forceful. The resultant insights into Parmenidean logic, ontology and method cannot easily be discounted. Austin claims that Parmenides uses a consciously systematic and exhaustive method to describe being. Thus, he argues, all the arguments and distinctions of the "Truth" section--and to (...)
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  13.  5
    Plato's Theaetetus. [REVIEW]E. E. Benitez - 1989 - Review of Metaphysics 43 (2):385-386.
    This book is a tour de force in the Oxford tradition of philosophical commentaries. Bostok's interest is not primarily the drama, characters, or setting of the Theaetetus, but the interpretation and evaluation of the arguments presented therein. Consequently, the dialogue receives a rather different treatment than the one to be found in Seth Benardete's The Being of the Beautiful, which is not mentioned by Bostok. Bostok's analysis of the Theaetetus is set against a background of ancient, modern, and contemporary epistemology. (...)
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  14.  3
    Characterisation and Interpretation: The Importance of Drama in Plato's Sophist.Eugenio Benitez - 1996 - Literature & Aesthetics 6:27-39.
    Plato's Sophist is complex. Its themes are many and ambiguous. The early grammarians gave it the subtitle1tEp1. 'tau ov'to~ ('on being') and assigned it to Plato's logical investigations. The Neoplatonists prized it for a theory of ontological categories they preferred to Aristotle's. Modern scholars sometimes court paradox and refer to the Sophist as Plato's dialogue on not-being (because the question ofthe possibility of not-being occupies much of the dialogue). Whitehead took the Sophist to be primarily about ouvo.~t~ ('power') and found (...)
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  15.  34
    "Republic" 476d6-E2: Plato's Dialectical Requirement.Eugenio Benitez - 1996 - Review of Metaphysics 49 (3):515 - 546.
    JL his paper calls into question a conventional way of reading the passage concerning knowledge and belief at the end of book 5 of Plato's Republic. On the conventional reading, Plato is committed to arguing on grounds that his philosophical opponents would accept, but this view fails to appreciate the rhetorical context in which the passage is situated. Indeed, it is not usually recognized or considered important that the passage has a rhetorical context at all. Philoso phers typically reduce the (...)
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  16.  52
    Plato's Analogy Between Law and Painting: Laws VI.769a-771a.Eugenio Benitez - 2010 - Philosophical Inquiry 32 (1-2):1-19.
  17.  34
    Introduction to Special Issue of The European Legacy: Philosophy and the Longing for Myth.Harold Tarrant & Eugenio Benitez - 2007 - The European Legacy 12 (2):133-139.
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  18. Positive Love.Eugenio Benitez - 2003 - Literature & Aesthetics 13 (2):29.
     
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  19.  25
    Plato and Pythagoreanism by Phillip Horky. [REVIEW]Eugenio Benitez - 2014 - Review of Metaphysics 68 (2):429-431.
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  20.  8
    Introduction to Special Issue of Literature and Aesthetics: Before Pangaea: New Essays in Transcultural Aesthetics.Eugenio Benitez - 2005 - Literature and Aesthetics 15 (1):7-11.
    Aesthetics presents a confusing domain for a philosopher. Its territory seems like an Empedoclean cosmos: a ceaselessly dynamic interchange of mixtures, at times resisting division, at times fracturing into an incomprehensible manifold. There may be no truth in aesthetics at all. Perhaps there is not even much truth about it. Some think of aesthetics primarily as a cultural or political phenomenon, others manage to reduce it to history (indeed, to a history that is over, and therefore safe). Still others investigate (...)
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  21.  8
    Plato's Laws on Correctness as the Standard of Art.Eugenio Benitez - 2009 - Literature & Aesthetics 19 (1):237-256.
    Most readers of Plato’s dialogues would probably think of him as likely to approve more of the old masters than of new art. The old masters were on the whole far more realistic than modern painters—compare, say, Velázquez Innocent X (1650) with Matisse The Snail (1953)2—and Plato often seems to take issue with an artist if he departs even slightly from realism. A long section of the Ion, for example, is dedicated to showing that experts in charioteering, medicine, and other (...)
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  22.  24
    Pleasure, Knowledge, and Being: An Analysis of Plato's Philebus. [REVIEW]Eugenio Benitez - 1991 - Review of Metaphysics 45 (2):401-404.
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  23.  29
    Deliberation and Moral Expertise in Plato's "Crito".Eugenio Benitez - 1996 - Apeiron 29 (4):21 - 47.
    Deliberation is the intellectual activity of rational agents in their capacity as rational agents, and good deliberation is the mark of those who have practical wisdom. That is Aristotle's general view,2 one we may safely attribute to Plato as well. Some philosophers, however, have tried to specifiy Plato's view in ways that accentuate the differences between him and Aristotle. They align Plato's views about deliberation and virtue closely with views the fifth-century sophists, and suppose that Plato borrows from the sophists (...)
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  24.  18
    Moral Awareness in Greek Tragedy. [REVIEW]Eugenio Benitez - 2014 - The Classical Review 64 (2):354-355.
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  25.  20
    Plato's Ethics. [REVIEW]Eugenio Benitez - 1996 - Review of Metaphysics 50 (1):159-161.
  26.  17
    Plato and His Predecessors: The Dramatisation of Reason. [REVIEW]Eugenio Benitez - 2002 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 40 (1):115-116.
  27.  5
    Tolstoy and the Communication of Aesthetic Feeling.Eugenio Benitez - 2005 - Literature and Aesthetics 15 (2):167-176.
    Once upon a time, a scholar, ascetic and relig-ious man named Abu Hamid Ibn Muhammad Ibn Muhammad al-Tusi al-Shafi'i al-Ghazali (AI-Ghazali, 1058-11 II) wrote a worl, called The Incoherence qf the Philosophers, 1\ clever philosopher, Abu AI-\Valid Muhammad Ibn Ahmad Ibn Hushd (Averroes, 112li-1 ID8), responded to this by writing The IlIcolurence (!l the Inroherence. In IVhat is Art;;, Tolstoy refers to the importance of art in order to ridicule itl He notes the attention paid to art, music, theatre, filrn, (...)
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  28.  12
    Parmenides: Being, Bounds and Logic by Scott Austin. [REVIEW]Eugenio Benitez - 1987 - Review of Metaphysics 40 (3):562-563.
  29.  20
    Eros and Logos. [REVIEW]Eugenio Benitez - 1994 - Review of Metaphysics 48 (1):176-177.
    This little book, which ostensibly concerns "the conflict between Isocrates and Plato on the subject of Athenian culture, as seen through the Symposium," ought not to escape the attention of Plato scholars or philosophers. The antithesis between a rhetorical ideal of open conversation and a philosophical ideal of objective accord is the main issue here, and the lessons of the book are as important to the twentieth century as they are to the time of Plato. Wohlman sees the Symposium as (...)
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  30.  4
    Cowardice, Moral Philosophy and Saying What You Think.Eugenio Benitez - 2000 - In Gerald Press (ed.), Who Speaks for Plato. Savage, MD: Rowman and Littlefield. pp. 83-98.
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  31.  9
    Deliberation and Moral Expertise in Plato's Crito.Eugenio Benitez - 1996 - Apeiron 29 (4):21-48.
  32.  15
    Plato's Philebus. [REVIEW]Eugenio Benitez - 1995 - Review of Metaphysics 48 (3):675-676.
  33.  16
    Plato's Theaetetus. [REVIEW]Eugenio Benitez - 1989 - Review of Metaphysics 43 (2):385-387.
  34.  12
    On Literal Translation: Robert Browning and the Aeschylus' Agamemnon.Eugenio Benitez - 2004 - Philosophy and Literature 28 (2):259-268.
    May I be permitted to chat a little, by way of recreation, at the end of a somewhat toilsome and perhaps fruitless adventure?”1 So begins the introduction to Robert Browning’s “transcription,” as he entitles it, of Aeschylus’s Agamemnon, in which the principles of literal translation are discussed and defended.2 As one who has recently been on the same adventure as Robert Browning, I wonder whether it is not salutary to review his arguments, for I have come to believe firmly that (...)
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  35.  7
    Preface to Dialogues with Plato.Eugenio Benitez - 1996 - Apeiron 29 (4):vii-viii.
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  36.  2
    Maculated Conceptions.Eugenio Benitez - 2003 - Literature & Aesthetics 13 (2):56.
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  37. Aesthetic Order by Ruth Lorand. [REVIEW]Eugenio Benitez - 2002 - Literature and Aesthetics 12 (2):148-152.
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  38. Plato's Socrates. [REVIEW]Eugenio Benitez - 1997 - Philosophical Books 38:37-39.
     
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  39. Dialogues with Plato.Eugenio Benitez (ed.) - 1996 - Edmonton: Academic Printing and Publishing.
     
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  40. Il Palazzo Della gioia.Eugenio Benitez - 2003 - Literature & Aesthetics 13 (2):82.
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  41. Michael Frede: "Essays in Ancient Philosophy". [REVIEW]Eugenio Benitez - 1989 - The Thomist 53 (3):522.
     
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  42. Proclus’ Commentary on Plato’s Parmenides. [REVIEW]Eugenio Benitez - 1994 - Classicum 20:20-21.
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  43. Proceedings of the Pacific Rim Conference in Transcultural Aesthetics.Eugenio Benitez (ed.) - 1997 - Sydney: National Library of Australia.
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  44. Papers Presented at the Conference.Eugenio Benitez - 2005 - Literature & Aesthetics 15 (1):16-18.
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  45. Philosophy, Translation and Transcultural Aesthetics.Eugenio Benitez - 2008 - Skepsis: A Journal for Philosophy and Interdisciplinary Research 19 (1-2).
     
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  46. Plato's World. [REVIEW]Eugenio Benitez - 1995 - Metascience 8:69-71.
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  47.  4
    Reflections on Plato's Poetics: Essays From Beijing.Eugenio Benitez & Keping Wang (eds.) - 2016 - Berrima: Academic Printing and Publishing.
    Reflections on Plato’s Poetics presents the reflections of leading scholars from China and the West on the form, nature and significance of Plato's engagement with poetry. The book does not adopt any monolithic point of view about Plato and poetry. Instead it openly explores Plato's attitudes to poetry, both comprehensively and within the intricate confines of particular dialogues. These reflections reveal a Plato who is deeply influenced by poetry; a Plato who writes, at least very often, from within a poetic (...)
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  48. Parmenides: Being, Bounds and Logic. [REVIEW]Eugenio Benitez - 1987 - The Thomist 51 (2):377.
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  49. Transculturality, Art and Aesthetic Principles.Eugenio Benitez - 2005 - Literature & Aesthetics 15 (1):42-56.
     
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  50. Tolstoy and the Importance of Aesthetic Feeling.Eugenio Benitez - 2005 - Literature & Aesthetics 15 (2):167-176.
     
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