Results for 'Euthanasia'

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Bibliography: Euthanasia in Applied Ethics
  1.  21
    Codes and Declarations.Voluntary Euthanasia - 1998 - Nursing Ethics 5 (4):205-209.
  2. Euthanasia, ethics, and public policy: an argument against legalisation.John Keown - 2002 - New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.
    Whether the law should permit voluntary euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide is one of the most vital questions facing all modern societies. Internationally, the main obstacle to legalisation has proved to be the objection that, even if they were morally acceptable in certain 'hard cases', voluntary euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide could not be effectively controlled; society would slide down a 'slippery slope' to the killing of patients who did not make a free and informed request, or for whom palliative (...)
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  3. Euthanasia, Assisted Suicide and the Professional Obligations of Physicians.Lucie White - 2010 - Emergent Australasian Philosophers 3:1-15.
    Euthanasia and assisted suicide have proved to be very contentious topics in medical ethics. Some ethicists are particularly concerned that allowing physicians to carry out these procedures will undermine their professional obligations and threaten the very goals of medicine. However, I maintain that the fundamental goals of medicine not only do not preclude the practice of euthanasia and assisted suicide by physicians, but can in fact be seen to support these practices in some instances. I look at two (...)
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  4. Euthanasia, or Mercy Killing.Nathan Nobis - 2019 - 1000-Word Philosophy: An Introductory Anthology.
    Sadly, there are people in very bad medical conditions who want to die. They are in pain, they are suffering, and they no longer find their quality of life to be at an acceptable level anymore. -/- When people like this are kept alive by machines or other medical treatments, can it be morally permissible to let them die? -/- Advocates of “passive euthanasia” argue that it can be. Their reasons, however, suggest that it can sometimes be not wrong (...)
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  5. Advance euthanasia directives: a controversial case and its ethical implications.David Gibbes Miller, Rebecca Dresser & Scott Y. H. Kim - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (2):84-89.
    Authorising euthanasia and assisted suicide with advance euthanasia directives is permitted, yet debated, in the Netherlands. We focus on a recent controversial case in which a Dutch woman with Alzheimer’s disease was euthanised based on her AED. A Dutch euthanasia review committee found that the physician performing the euthanasia failed to follow due care requirements for euthanasia and assisted suicide. This case is notable because it is the first case to trigger a criminal investigation since (...)
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  6. The Euthanasia of Companion Animals.Michael Cholbi - 2017 - In Christine Overall (ed.), Pets and People: The Ethics of our Relationships with Companion Animals. Oxford University Press. pp. 264-278.
    Argues that considerations central to the justification of euthanizing humans do not readily extrapolate to the euthanasia of pets and companion animals; that the comparative account of death's badness can be successfully applied to such animals to ground the justification of their euthanasia and its timing; and proposes that companion animal guardians have authority to decide to euthanize such animals because of their epistemic standing regarding such animals' welfare.
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  7.  5
    Euthanasia and the Newborn: Conflicts Regarding Saving Lives.Richard C. McMillan, H. Tristram Engelhardt & Stuart F. Spicker - 1987 - Springer.
    The essays in this volume, with the exception of Gary Ferngren's, derive from ancestral versions originally presented at a symposium, 'Conflicts with Newborns: Saving Lives, Scarce Resources, and Euthanasia: held May 10-12,1984, at the Mercer University School of Medicine, Macon, Georgia. We wish to express our gratitude to the Georgia Endowment for the Humanities for a generous grant for the symposium and to Mercer University and the Medical Center of Central Georgia for additional financial support. The vit:ws expressed in (...)
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  8. Legalising euthanasia for children: Dying with 'dignity' or killing the vulnerable?Caroline Ong - 2014 - Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin 20 (1):5.
    Ong, Caroline In February 2014, the Belgian parliament passed an amendment to the Belgian Act on Euthanasia of May 28th, 2002 removing the age limit of those requesting euthanasia provided that they have discerning capabilities and their parents approve. After mentioning briefly the arguments against legalising euthanasia, this article questions the ethical validity of removing the age limit, as well as the presumption that ending lives prematurely allows people to die with dignity. Caring for people who are (...)
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  9.  78
    QALYs, euthanasia and the puzzle of death.Stephen Barrie - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (8):635-638.
    This paper considers the problems that arise when death, which is a philosophically difficult concept, is incorporated into healthcare metrics, such as the quality-adjusted life year (QALY). These problems relate closely to the debate over euthanasia and assisted suicide because negative QALY scores can be taken to mean that patients would be ‘better off dead’. There is confusion in the literature about the meaning of 0 QALY, which is supposed to act as an ‘anchor’ for the surveyed preferences on (...)
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  10. Voluntary euthanasia and the common law.Margaret Otlowski - 1997 - New York: Clarendon Press.
    Margaret Otlowski investigates the complex and controversial issue of active voluntary euthanasia. She critically examines the criminal law prohibition of medically administered active voluntary euthanasia in common law jurisdictions, and carefully looks at the situation as handled in practice. The evidence of patient demands for active euthanasia and the willingness of some doctors to respond to patients' requests is explored, and an argument for reform of the law is made with reference to the position in the Netherlands (...)
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  11. Euthanasia Laws, Slippery Slopes, and (Un)reasonable Precaution.Friderik Klampfer - 2019 - Prolegomena: Časopis Za Filozofiju 18 (2):121-147.
    The article examines the so-called slippery slope argument (SSA) against the legalization of active voluntary euthanasia (AVE). According to the SSA, by legalizing AVE, the least morally controversial type of euthanasia, we will take the first step onto a slippery slope and inevitably end up in the moral abyss of widespread abuse and violations of the rights of the weakest and most vulnerable patients. In the first part of the paper, empirical evidence to the contrary is presented and (...)
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  12. Euthanasia and cryothanasia.Francesca Minerva & Anders Sandberg - 2017 - Bioethics 31 (7):526-533.
    In this article we discuss the moral and legal aspects of causing the death of a terminal patient in the hope of extending their life in the future. We call this theoretical procedure cryothanasia. We argue that administering cryothanasia is ethically different from administering euthanasia. Consequently, objections to euthanasia should not apply to cryothanasia, and cryothanasia could also be considered a legal option where euthanasia is illegal.
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  13.  34
    On euthanasia: Exploring psychological meaning and attitudes in a Sample of mexican physicians and medical students.Asunción Álvarez Del Río & Ma Luisa Marván - 2011 - Developing World Bioethics 11 (3):146-153.
    Euthanasia has become the subject of ethical and political debate in many countries including Mexico. Since many physicians are deeply concerned about euthanasia, due to their crucial participation in its decision and implementation, it is important to know the psychological meaning that the term ‘euthanasia’ has for them, as well as their attitudes toward this practice. This study explores psychological meaning and attitudes toward euthanasia in 546 Mexican subjects, either medical students or physicians, who were divided (...)
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  14. Euthanasia Laws, Slippery Slopes, and (Un)reasonable Precaution.Friderik Klampfer - 2019 - Prolegomena: Časopis Za Filozofiju 18 (2):121-147.
    The article examines the so-called slippery slope argument (SSA) against the legalization of active voluntary euthanasia (AVE). According to the SSA, by legalizing AVE, the least morally controversial type of euthanasia, we will take the first step onto a slippery slope and inevitably end up in the moral abyss of widespread abuse and violations of the rights of the weakest and most vulnerable patients. In the first part of the paper, empirical evidence to the contrary is presented and (...)
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  15.  82
    Euthanasia in Video Games – Exemplifying the Importance of Moral Experience in Digital Gameworlds.Luka Perušić - 2022 - Pannoniana 6 (1):53-98.
    The paper classifies euthanasia and discusses its typological presence in storytelling video games. It aims to illustrate the importance of experiencing simulated moral challenges in the context of gameworlds as a significantly influential, exponentially growing form of interactive media. In contrast to older works of art and media, such as film and literature, the difference should be emphasized in light of the player’s ability to make choices in video games. Although the influence of gameworld content depends on the player, (...)
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  16.  18
    Euthanasia and the ethics of a doctor's decisions: an argument against assisted dying.Ole Johannes Hartling - 2021 - New York, NY: Bloomsbury Academic.
    Why do so many doctors have profound misgivings about the push to legalise euthanasia and assisted suicide? Ole Hartling uses his background as a physician, university professor and former president of the Danish Council of Ethics to introduce new elements into what can often be understood as an all too simple debate. Alive to the case that assisted dying can be driven by an unattainable yearning for control, Hartling concentrates on two fundamental questions: whether the answer to suffering is (...)
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  17. Euthanasia in psychiatry can never be justified. A reply to Wijsbek.Christopher Cowley - 2013 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 34 (3):227-238.
    In a recent article, Henri Wijsbek discusses the 1991 Chabot “psychiatric euthanasia” case in the Netherlands, and argues that Chabot was justified in helping his patient to die. Dutch legislation at the time permitted physician assisted suicide when the patient’s condition is severe, hopeless, and unbearable. The Dutch Supreme Court agreed with Chabot that the patient met these criteria because of her justified depression, even though she was somatically healthy. Wijsbek argues that in this case, the patient’s integrity had (...)
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  18. Voluntary euthanasia and the inalienable right to life.Joel Feinberg - 1978 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 7 (2):93-123.
  19. Euthanasia, death with dignity, and the law.Hazel Biggs - 2001 - Portland, Or.: Hart Publ..
    Machine generated contents note: Table of Cases xi -- Table of legislation xv -- Introduction: Medicine Men, Outlaws and Voluntary Euthanasia 1 -- 1. To Kill or not to Kill; is that the Euthanasia Question? 9 -- Introduction-Why Euthanasia? 9 -- Dead or alive? 16 -- Euthanasia as Homicide 25 -- Euthanasia as Death with Dignity 29 -- 2. Euthanasia and Clinically assisted Death: from Caring to Killing? 35 -- Introduction 35 -- The Indefinite (...)
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  20. Euthanasia and Physician-Assisted Suicide.Gerald Dworkin, R. G. Frey & Sissela Bok - 1998 - Cambridge University Press.
    The moral issues involved in doctors assisting patients to die with dignity are of absolutely central concern to the medical profession, ethicists, and the public at large. The debate is fuelled by cases that extend far beyond passive euthanasia to the active consideration of killing by physicians. The need for a sophisticated but lucid exposition of the two sides of the argument is now urgent. This book supplies that need. Two prominent philosophers, Gerald Dworkin and R. G. Frey present (...)
     
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  21. Euthanasia, Or Death Assisted to its Dignity.István Király V. - 2019 - Saarbrucken: Lambert Academic Publishing.
    The book attempts to conceptualize the “ancient” issues of human death and human mortality in connection to the timely and vital subject of euthanasia. This subject forces the meditation to actually consider those ideological, ethical, deontological, legal, and metaphysical frameworks which guide from the very beginning any kind of approach to this question. This conception – in dialogue with Heideggerian fundamental ontology and existential analytics – reveals that, on the one hand, the concepts and ethics of death are originally (...)
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  22. Euthanasia and Eudaimonia.David Shaw - 2009 - Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (9):530-533.
    This paper re-evaluates euthanasia and assisted suicide from the perspective of eudaimonia, the ancient Greek conception of happiness across one’s whole life. It is argued that one cannot be said to have fully flourished or had a truly happy life if one’s death is preceded by a period of unbearable pain or suffering that one cannot avoid without assistance in ending one’s life. While death is to be accepted as part of life, it should not be left to nature (...)
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  23.  25
    On Euthanasia: Exploring Psychological Meaning and Attitudes in a Sample of Mexican Physicians and Medical Students.Ma Luisa MarvÁn AsunciÓn Álvarez Del RÍo - 2011 - Developing World Bioethics 11 (3):146-153.
    Euthanasia has become the subject of ethical and political debate in many countries including Mexico. Since many physicians are deeply concerned about euthanasia, due to their crucial participation in its decision and implementation, it is important to know the psychological meaning that the term ‘euthanasia’ has for them, as well as their attitudes toward this practice. This study explores psychological meaning and attitudes toward euthanasia in 546 Mexican subjects, either medical students or physicians, who were divided (...)
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  24. Child euthanasia: should we just not talk about it?Luc Bovens - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (8):630-634.
    Belgium has recently extended its euthanasia legislation to minors, making it the first legislation in the world that does not specify any age limit. I consider two strands in the opposition to this legislation. First, I identify five arguments in the public debate to the effect that euthanasia for minors is somehow worse than euthanasia for adults—viz. arguments from weightiness, capability of discernment, pressure, sensitivity and sufficient palliative care—and show that these arguments are wanting. Second, there is (...)
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  25. Suicide, Euthanasia and Human Dignity.Friderik Klampfer - 2001 - Acta Analytica 16:7-34.
    Kant has famously argued that human beings or persons, in virtue of their capacity for rational and autonomous choice and agency, possess dignity, which is an intrinsic, final, unconditional, inviolable, incomparable and irreplaceable value. This value, wherever found, commands respect and imposes rather strict moral constraints on our deliberations, intentions and actions. This paper deals with the question of whether, as some Kantians have recently argued, certain types of (physician-assisted) suicide and active euthanasia, most notably the intentional destruction of (...)
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  26.  99
    Euthanasia and end-of-life practices in France and Germany. A comparative study.Ruth Horn - 2013 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (2):197-209.
    The objective of this paper is to understand from a sociological perspective how the moral question of euthanasia, framed as the “right to die”, emerges and is dealt with in society. It takes France and Germany as case studies, two countries in which euthanasia is prohibited and which have similar legislation on the issue. I presuppose that, and explore how, each society has its own specificities in terms of practical, social and political norms that affect the ways in (...)
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  27. Neonatal euthanasia is unsupportable: The groningen protocol should be abandoned.Alexander A. Kon - 2007 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 28 (5):453-463.
    The growing support for voluntary active euthanasia is evident in the recently approved Dutch Law on Termination of Life on Request. Indeed, the debate over legalized VAE has increased in European countries, the United States, and many other nations over the last several years. The proponents of VAE argue that when a patient judges that the burdens of living outweigh the benefits, euthanasia can be justified. If some adults suffer to such an extent that VAE is justified, then (...)
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  28.  81
    Euthanasia: toward an ethical social policy.David C. Thomasma - 1990 - New York: Continuum. Edited by Glenn C. Graber.
    Thomasma and Graber, medical ethics theorists and clinical practitioners, present a definitive examination of the actions that fall under the aegis of euthanasia--the art of painlessly putting to death persons suffering from incurable conditions or diseases. They distinguish active euthanasia as an intentional act that causes death, while passive euthanasia is seen as an intentional act to avoid prolonging the dying process. They maintain that the distinction between these two modes of euthanasia depends not on motive, (...)
  29. Euthanasia.Philippa Foot - 1977 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 6 (2):85-112.
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  30.  55
    Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide: Global Views on Choosing to End Life.Michael Cholbi (ed.) - 2017 - Praeger.
    This two-volume set addresses key historical, scientific, legal, and philosophical issues surrounding euthanasia and assisted suicide in the United States as well as in other countries and cultures. * Addresses the extended history of debates regarding the ethical justifiability of assisted suicide and euthanasia * Analyzes assisted suicide and euthanasia in many cultural, philosophical, and religious traditions * Provides an interdisciplinary perspective on the subject, including coverage of topics such as the depictions of assisted dying in popular (...)
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  31. Battlefield Euthanasia: Should Mercy-Killings Be Allowed?L. Perry David - 2014 - Parameters 44 (4).
    Analysis of ethical and legal issues in battlefield euthanasia or military mercy-killing.
     
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  32.  5
    Euthanasia.Lisa Yount (ed.) - 2002 - San Diego, Calif.: Greenhaven Press.
    Essays discuss euthanasia and the medical, legal, and ethical controversies surrounding it.
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  33.  27
    Euthanasia and assisted suicide: Who are the vulnerable?Meta Rus & Chris Gastmans - forthcoming - Clinical Ethics.
    One of the common domains in health care in which the concept of vulnerability is used is end-of-life care, including euthanasia and assisted suicide (EAS). Since different uses and implications of the notion have been recognised in the literature on EAS, this paper aims to analyse them and reflect on who is the most vulnerable in the context of EAS. A prior exploratory review of the literature has served as a starting point for the discussion. We concluded that vulnerability (...)
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  34.  41
    Euthanasia: the moral issues.Robert M. Baird & Stuart E. Rosenbaum (eds.) - 1989 - Buffalo, N.Y.: Prometheus Books.
    Essays discuss active and passive euthanasia, the right to die, and the care of the terminally ill.
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  35.  23
    Euthanasia requests in dementia cases; what are experiences and needs of Dutch physicians? A qualitative interview study.Jaap Schuurmans, Romy Bouwmeester, Lamar Crombach, Tessa van Rijssel, Lizzy Wingens, Kristina Georgieva, Nadine O’Shea, Stephanie Vos, Bram Tilburgs & Yvonne Engels - 2019 - BMC Medical Ethics 20 (1):1-9.
    In the Netherlands, in 2002, euthanasia became a legitimate medical act, only allowed when the due care criteria and procedural requirements are met. Legally, an Advanced Euthanasia Directive can replace direct communication if a patient can no longer express his own wishes. In the past decade, an exponential number of persons with dementia share a euthanasia request with their physician. The impact this on physicians, and the consequent support needs, remained unknown. Our objective was to gain more (...)
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  36. Euthanasia: Considerations Regarding Depression and Ethics.Louis Caruana & Y. Cho - 1995 - Cambridge Medicine 11 (3):35-36.
    Presenting the case against legalizing euthanasia, this paper refers mainly to two clinical facts. First that, in the majority of cases, a wish to die is a symptom of depression; and second, that depression affects rational decision making. Since a depressive individual is not fully competent, it is a mistake to resort to that individual's autonomy. One should recall that a subclinical depressive state is an object of treatment, and safeguards are necessary lest this state should be an object (...)
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  37. Euthanasia.Carrie L. Snyder (ed.) - 2006 - Detroit: Greenhaven Press.
    Presents arguments on both sides of the issue of euthanasia, including questions regarding ethics and legality, physician-assisted suicide, living wills, and removing life support from patients in a persistent vegetative state.
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  38. Can Euthanasia be part of ‘Good-Doctoring?’.Sahin Aksoy - 2000 - Eubios Journal of Asian and International Bioethics 10 (5):152-153.
    Euthanasia is a popular subject that health care professionals, lawyers and theologians has dealt with for a long time. While it was an extreme and exceptional case to support and argue in favour of euthanasia among health care professionals and lay public, it becomes more and more common to see supporters of this act especially among health care professionals.In this article euthanasia is examined from different perspectives, and tried to draw a conclusion that may be helpful to (...)
     
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  39. On euthanasia: Blindspots in the argument from mercy.Sarah Bachelard - 2002 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 19 (2):131–140.
    In the euthanasia debate, the argument from mercy holds that if someone is in unbearable pain and is hopelessly ill or injured, then mercy dictates that inflicting death may be morally justified. One common way of setting the stage for the argument from mercy is to draw parallels between human and animal suffering, and to suggest that insofar as we are prepared to relieve an animal’s suffering by putting it out of its misery we should likewise be prepared to (...)
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  40.  55
    Active euthanasia: on some inconsistencies in the current debate on euthanasia.Hans Günther Ruß - 2002 - Ethik in der Medizin 14 (1):11-19.
    Definition of the problem: Concerning the debate on euthanasia, a widely held position is that it should be accepted in its so-called passive and indirect form, while so-called active euthanasia should be rejected. The problem, now, is that at least some of the usual arguments to defend this view are invalid. Arguments: Three kinds of failures are examinded: First, if taken seriously, some of the arguments against active euthanasia undermine the accepted passive and indirect forms, too. For (...)
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  41.  3
    Euthanasia in international and comparative perspective.M. S. Groenhuijsen & Floris van Laanen (eds.) - 2006 - Nijmegen: Wolf Legal Publishers.
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  42. Euthanasia and the sacred.Michael Kelly - 2020 - The Australasian Catholic Record 97 (1):74.
    For euthanasia the case is deceptively easy to make. When the suffering of others is ended by death we often feel relief. Commonly we accept that animals must sometimes, as the saying goes, be 'put out of their misery'. And, while most people who advocate euthanasia do not rely simply on our revulsion from suffering as though there were no other considerations, the public appeal of their view probably does rest largely on it.
     
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  43.  43
    Euthanasia and assisted suicide for people with an intellectual disability and/or autism spectrum disorder: an examination of nine relevant euthanasia cases in the Netherlands.Irene Tuffrey-Wijne, Leopold Curfs, Ilora Finlay & Sheila Hollins - 2018 - BMC Medical Ethics 19 (1):17.
    Euthanasia and assisted suicide have been legally possible in the Netherlands since 2001, provided that statutory due care criteria are met, including: voluntary and well-considered request; unbearable suffering without prospect of improvement; informing the patient; lack of a reasonable alternative; independent second physician’s opinion. ‘Unbearable suffering’ must have a medical basis, either somatic or psychiatric, but there is no requirement of limited life expectancy. All EAS cases must be reported and are scrutinised by regional review committees. The purpose of (...)
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  44. Euthanasia and well-being: did Joseph Raz change his mind?Terence Rajivan Edward - manuscript
    I identify what appears to be a "glaring" inconsistency between what Joseph Raz says on euthanasia in a 2012 lecture and what he says on well-being within his most celebrated book, The Morality of Freedom. There also appears to be a subtler inconsistency between what he says and his endorsement of H.L.A. Hart’s opposition to a definitional project.
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  45.  15
    Euthanasia for Detainees in Belgium.Katrien Devolder - 2016 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 25 (3):384-394.
    In 2011, Frank Van Den Bleeken became the first detainee to request euthanasia under Belgium’s Euthanasia Act of 2002. This article investigates whether it would be lawful and morally permissible for a doctor to accede to this request. Though Van Den Bleeken has not been held accountable for the crimes he committed, he has been detained in an ordinary prison, without appropriate psychiatric care, for more than 30 years. It is first established that VDB’s euthanasia request plausibly (...)
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  46. Euthanasia and assisted suicide.Bernard M. Dickens, Joseph M. Boyle Jr & Linda Ganzini - 2008 - In Peter A. Singer & A. M. Viens (eds.), The Cambridge Textbook of Bioethics. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  47. Voluntary Euthanasia: A Utilitarian Perspective.Peter Singer - 2003 - Bioethics 17 (5-6):526-541.
    ABSTRACT Belgium legalised voluntary euthanasia in 2002, thus ending the long isolation of the Netherlands as the only country in which doctors could openly give lethal injections to patients who have requested help in dying. Meanwhile in Oregon, in the United States, doctors may prescribe drugs for terminally ill patients, who can use them to end their life – if they are able to swallow and digest them. But despite President Bush's oft‐repeated statements that his philosophy is to ‘trust (...)
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  48.  30
    Euthanasia: above ground, below ground.R. S. Magnusson - 2004 - Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (5):441-446.
    The key to the euthanasia debate lies in how best to regulate what doctors do. Opponents of euthanasia frequently warn of the possible negative consequences of legalising physician assisted suicide and active euthanasia while ignoring the covert practice of PAS/AE by doctors and other health professionals. Against the background of survey studies suggesting that anything from 4% to 10% of doctors have intentionally assisted a patient to die, and interview evidence of the unregulated, idiosyncratic nature of underground (...)
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  49.  38
    Euthanasia: opposing viewpoints.James D. Torr (ed.) - 2000 - San Diego: Greenhaven Press.
    Presents opposing viewpoints on various ethical, moral, legal, and medical issues concerning euthanasia.
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  50.  32
    Euthanasia, Physician Assisted Suicide and Other Methods of Helping Along Death.Erich H. Loewy - 2004 - Health Care Analysis 12 (3):181-193.
    This paper introduces a series of papers dealing with the topic of euthanasia as an introduction to a variety of attitudes by health-care professionals and philosophers interested in this issue. The lead in paper—and really the lead in idea—stresses the fact that what we are discussing concerns only a minority of people lucky enough to live in conditions of acceptable sanitation and who have access to medical care. The topic of euthanasia and PAS really has three questions: (1) (...)
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