7 found
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  1.  23
    Nothing to complain about? Residents’ and relatives’ views on a “good life” and ethical challenges in nursing homes.Georg Bollig, Eva Gjengedal & Jan Henrik Rosland - 2016 - Nursing Ethics 23 (2):142-153.
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  2.  52
    Vulnerability in health care – reflections on encounters in every day practice.Eva Gjengedal, Else Mari Ekra, Hege Hol, Marianne Kjelsvik, Else Lykkeslet, Ragnhild Michaelsen, Aud Orøy, Torill Skrondal, Hildegunn Sundal, Solfrid Vatne & Kjersti Wogn-Henriksen - 2013 - Nursing Philosophy 14 (2):127-138.
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  3.  43
    Do we treat individuals as patients or as potential donors? A phenomenological study of healthcare professionals’ experiences.Aud Orøy, Kjell Erik Strømskag & Eva Gjengedal - 2015 - Nursing Ethics 22 (2):163-175.
    Background:Organ donation and transplantation have made it possible to both save life and to improve the quality of life for a large number of patients. In the last years there has been an increasing gap between the number of patients who need organs and organs available for transplantation, and the focus worldwide has been on how to meet the organ shortage. This also rises some ethical challenges.Objective:The objective of this study was to explore healthcare professionals' experience of ethics related to (...)
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  4.  33
    How can everyday practical knowledge be understood with inspiration from philosophy?Else Lykkeslet & Eva Gjengedal - 2006 - Nursing Philosophy 7 (2):79-89.
    Many nursing scholars are inspired by philosophy when investigating phenomena within nursing. This paper focuses on the everyday practical knowledge of nurses. Based on an empirical project carried out in a surgical ward the authors make an attempt, with help from philosophy, at identifying and conceptualizing elements of knowledge in everyday practice. With reference to texts by Heidegger and Wittgenstein the authors investigate two dimensions of nursing knowledge: a dimension of doing and a dimension of being. These dimensions are further (...)
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  5.  16
    Beyond autonomy and care: Experiences of ambivalent abortion seekers.Marianne Kjelsvik, Ragnhild J. Tveit Sekse, Asgjerd Litleré Moi, Elin M. Aasen, Per Nortvedt & Eva Gjengedal - forthcoming - Nursing Ethics:096973301881912.
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  6.  17
    Viewing the image? Ultrasound examination during abortion preparations, ethical challenges.Marianne Kjelsvik, Ragnhild J. T. Sekse, Elin M. Aasen & Eva Gjengedal - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (2):511-522.
    During preparation for early abortion in Norway, an ultrasound examination is usually performed to determine gestation and viability. This article aims to provide a deeper understanding of women’s and health care personnel’s experiences with ultrasound viewing during abortion preparation in the first trimester. Qualitative in-depth interviews with women who had been prepared for early abortion and focus group interviews with HCP from gynaecological units were carried out. A hermeneutic-phenomenological analysis, inspired by van Manen, was chosen. Thirteen women who were pregnant (...)
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  7.  40
    The (dis)appearance of the dying patient in generalist hospital and care home nurses' talk about the patient.Kirsten Schou, Herdis Alvsvåg, Gunnhild Blåka & Eva Gjengedal - 2008 - Nursing Philosophy 9 (4):233-247.
    Abstract This article explores interview data from a study of 50 Norwegian generalist nurses' focus group accounts of caring for dying patients in the hospital and care home. An eclectic discourse analytic approach was applied to nurses' accounts of the patient and three discursive contexts of reference to the patient were identified: the 'taken as read' patient, the patient paired with particular characteristics and the patient as psychologically present. Talk about the patient falls mainly into the first two contexts, which (...)
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