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Evangelos D. Protopapadakis [4]Evangelos Protopapadakis [1]
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Profile: Evangelos D. Protopapadakis (University of Athens)
  1. Climate Change: A Challenge for Ethics.Evangelos D. Protopapadakis - 2012 - In Walter Leal Filho Evangelos Manolas (ed.), English through Climate Change. Democritus University of Thrace. pp. 167.
    Climate change – and its most dangerous consequence, the rapid overheating of the planet – is not the offspring of a natural procedure; instead, it is human-induced. It is only the aftermath of a specific pattern of conomic development, one that focuses mainly on economic growth rather than on quality of life and sustainability. Since climate change is a major threat not only to millions of humans, but also to numerous non-human species and other forms of life, as well as (...)
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  2. Death is Nothing to Us: A Critical Analysis of the Epicurean Views Concerning the Dread of Death.Evangelos D. Protopapadakis - 2014 - In Ksenija Maricki Gadzanski (ed.), Antiquity and Modern World: Interpretations of Antiquity. The Serbian Society for Ancient Studies. pp. 316-323.
    To the mind of humans death is an impossible riddle, the ultimate of mysteries; therefore it has always been considered a task of paramount importance for philosophers to provide a satisfactory account for death. Among the numerous efforts to deal with the riddle of death, Epicurus’ one stands out not only for its unsurpassed simplicity and lucidness, but also for the innovative manner in which it approaches the issue: Epicurus denounces the fear of death as a profoundly unfruitful, unreasonable and (...)
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  3. A Cool Hand on My Feverish Forehead: An Even Better Samaritan and the Ethics of Abortion.Evangelos Protopapadakis - 2012 - Philosophy Study 2 (2):115-123.
    The debate concerning abortion abounds in miraculous narratives. Judith Jarvis Thomson has contrived the most celebrated set among related ones, to wit the “violinist analogy,” the “Good Samaritan” narrative, and the “Henry Fonda” allegory, by virtue of which, she intends, on the one hand, to argue that women’s right to autonomy outweighs the alleged fetus’s right to life, and on the other, to prove that no positive moral duties can be derived towards other persons alone from the fact that a (...)
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  4.  52
    Clones, Prototypes and the Right to Uniqueness.Evangelos D. Protopapadakis - 20014 - Agrafa 1 (2):40-47.
    Human cloning until recently has been considered to belong to the domain of science fiction; now it is a tangible possibility, a hopeful as well as a fearsome one. One of the fears that necessarily come along with it is about the peril cloning might represent for human uniqueness, since the clones are expected to be identical to their prototypes; this would unavoidably compromise moral agents’ right to a unique identity. In this paper I will put under examination the argument (...)
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  5.  15
    Animal Ethics: Past and Present Perspectives.Evangelos D. Protopapadakis (ed.) - 2012 - Logos Verlag.
    Philosophy, as Aristotle said, originates in wonder. And nonhuman animals have long been a source of wonder to humans, especially in regard to the treatment they deserve. The upshot is that Western philosophy has been concerned with the way in which we ought to treat nonhuman animals since its origins with the pre-Socratic philosophers. -/- Animal ethics is a highly challenging field, as well as one of the liveliest areas of debate in ethics in recent years. Not only has this (...)
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