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  1.  17
    Jerusalem Under Siege: Marino Sanudo's Map of the Water Supply, 1320.Evelyn Edson - 2012 - In Imagining Jerusalem in the Medieval West. pp. 201.
    The map of Jerusalem, which appeared in 1320 in Marino Sanudo's book, Liber secretorum fidelium crucis, has no obvious precursor, though it draws on textual sources from the works of Josephus to the thirteenth-century description of the Holy Land by Burchard of Mt. Sion. Surrounded by an irregular polygon of walls, the city is mapped in a style similar to the other maps in the book, drawn by the sea-chart maker Pietro Vesconte. These maps emphasize the contemporary, physical reality of (...)
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  2.  13
    Natalia Lozovsky, ‘the Earth is Our Book’: Geographical Knowledge in the Latin West Ca. 400–1000. Recentiores: Latin Texts and Contexts. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2000. Pp. IX+182. Isbn 0-472-11132-9. £28.00, $44.50. [REVIEW]Evelyn Edson - 2004 - British Journal for the History of Science 37 (2):196-197.
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    Barbara Obrist. La Cosmologie Médiévale: Textes Et Images. Volume 1: Les Fondements Antiques. 380 Pp., Illus., Bibl., Index. Florence: Sismel Edizioni Del Galluzzo, 2004. €72. [REVIEW]Evelyn Edson - 2007 - Isis 98 (1):177-178.
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  4. Medieval Views of the Cosmos.Evelyn Edson - 2004 - Bodleian Library, University of Oxford.
    Once upon a time, the universe was much simpler: before our modern understanding of an infinite formless space scattered with pulsating stars, revolving planets, and mysterious black holes, the universe was seen as a rigid hierarchical system with the earth and the human race at its center. Medieval Views of the Cosmos investigates this worldview shared by medieval societies, revealing how their modes of thought affect us even today. In the medieval world system--inherited by Christians and Muslims from the Greeks (...)
     
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