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  1.  3
    Researcher and study participants’ perspectives of consent in clinical studies in four referral hospitals in Vietnam.Jennifer Ilo Van Nuil, Thi Thanh Thuy Nguyen, Thanh Nhan Le Nguyen, Van Vinh Chau Nguyen, Mary Chambers, Thi Dieu Ngan Ta, Laura Merson, Thi Phuong Dung Nguyen, Minh Tu Van Hoang, Michael Parker, Susan Bull & Evelyne Kestelyn - 2020 - BMC Medical Ethics 21 (1):1-12.
    Within the research community, it is generally accepted that consent processes for research should be culturally appropriate and tailored to the context, yet researchers continue to grapple with what valid consent means within specific stakeholder groups. In this study, we explored the consent practices and attitudes regarding essential information required for the consent process within hospital-based trial communities from four referral hospitals in Vietnam. We collected surveys from and conducted semi-structured interviews with study physicians, study nurses, ethics committee members, and (...)
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  2.  12
    Informed Consent, Community Engagement, and Study Participation at a Research Site in Kigali, Rwanda.Jennifer Ilo van Nuil, Evelyne Kestelyn, Grace Umutoni, Lambert Mwambarangwe, Marie M. Umulisa, Janneke van de Wijgert & Raffaella Ravinetto - 2018 - Developing World Bioethics 18 (4):349-356.
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    Informed Consent, Community Engagement, and Study Participation at a Research Site in Kigali, Rwanda.Jennifer Ilo Nuil, Evelyne Kestelyn, Grace Umutoni, Lambert Mwambarangwe, Marie M. Umulisa, Janneke Wijgert & Raffaella Ravinetto - 2018 - Developing World Bioethics 18 (4):349-356.
    People enroll in medical research for many reasons ranging from decisions regarding their own or family members' health situation to broader considerations including access to health and financial resources. In socially vulnerable communities the choice to participate is often based on a risk-benefit assessment that goes beyond the medical aspects of the research, and considers the benefits received. In this qualitative study, we examined the motivations of Rwandan women to participate in a non-commercial collaborative research study examining the safety, acceptability, (...)
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