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  1. Rethinking the Buddha: Early Buddhist Philosophy as Meditative Perception.Eviatar Shulman - 2014 - Cambridge University Press.
    A cornerstone of Buddhist philosophy, the doctrine of the four noble truths maintains that life is replete with suffering, desire is the cause of suffering, nirvana is the end of suffering, and the way to nirvana is the eightfold noble path. Although the attribution of this seminal doctrine to the historical Buddha is ubiquitous, Rethinking the Buddha demonstrates through a careful examination of early Buddhist texts that he did not envision them in this way. Shulman traces the development of what (...)
     
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    The Commitments of a Madhyamaka Trickster: Innovation in Candrakīrti’s Prasanna-Padā. [REVIEW]Eviatar Shulman - 2010 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 38 (4):379-417.
    This paper challenges the notion that there is a complete continuity between the thought of Nāgārjuna and the thought of Candrakīrti. It is shown that there is strong reason to doubt Candrakīrti’s gloss of Mūla-madhyamaka-kārikā (MMK) 2.1, and that Candrakīrti’s peculiar reading of this verse causes him to alter the context of the discussion in the four cases in which Nāgārjuna quotes MMK 2.1 later in the text—MMK 3.3, 7.14, 10.13 and 16.7. The innovation produced by Candrakīrti is next contrasted (...)
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    Early Meanings of Dependent-Origination.Eviatar Shulman - 2008 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 36 (2):297-317.
    Dependent-origination, possibly the most fundamental Buddhist philosophical principle, is generally understood as a description of all that exists. Mental as well as physical phenomena are believed to come into being only in relation to, and conditioned by, other phenomena. This paper argues that such an understanding of pratītya-samutpāda is mistaken with regard to the earlier meanings of the concept. Rather than relating to all that exists, dependent-origination related originally only to processes of mental conditioning. It was an analysis of the (...)
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    Vasubandhu on Truth and Subjectivity.Eviatar Shulman - 2010 - Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion 15:44-62.
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    Language, Understanding and Reality: A Study of Their Relation in a Foundational Indian Metaphysical Debate. [REVIEW]Eviatar Shulman - 2012 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 40 (3):339-369.
    This paper engages with Johaness Bronkhorst’s recognition of a “correspondence principle” as an underlying assumption of Nāgārjuna’s thought. Bronkhorst believes that this assumption was shared by most Indian thinkers of Nāgārjuna’s day, and that it stimulated a broad and fascinating attempt to cope with Nāgārjuna’s arguments so that the principle of correspondence may be maintained in light of his forceful critique of reality. For Bronkhorst, the principle refers to the relation between the words of a sentence and the realities they (...)
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    Aśvaghoṣa’s Viśeṣaka : The Saundarananda and Its Pāli “Equivalents”.Eviatar Shulman - 2019 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 47 (2):235-256.
    When compared with the Pāli versions of the Nanda tale—the story of the ordainment and liberation of the Buddha’s half-brother—some of the peculiar features of Aśvaghoṣa’s telling in the Saundarananda come to the fore. These include the enticing love games that Nanda plays with his wife Sundarī before he follows Buddha out of the house, and the powerful, troubling scene in which Buddha forces Nanda to ordain. While the Pāli versions are aware of fantastic elements such as the flight to (...)
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    The Forerunner of All Things: Buddhaghosa on Mind, Intention, and Agency by Maria Heim.Eviatar Shulman - 2016 - Philosophy East and West 66 (1):360-367.
    Maria Heim’s The Forerunner of All Things: Buddhaghosa on Mind, Intention, and Agency is a valuable contribution to the study of Buddhist philosophy and in certain respects signals a new stage in the field. This is especially true regarding the study of Theravāda Buddhist thought or the philosophy that is rooted in the Pāli Buddhist tradition. Clearly, leading Buddhist philosophers that history has chanced to include in the Mahāyāna camp, such as Nāgārjuna, Vasubandhu, Diṅnāga, Dharmakīrti, Candrakīrti and Tsongkhapa, have received (...)
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    Polyvalent Philosophy and Soteriology in Early Buddhism.Eviatar Shulman - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (3):864-886.
    The ideas of a “Buddha” or of his “enlightenment” suggest a certain unity and coherence. In accord with the positivist and metaphysical realist attitudes of our times, many assume that a Buddha is defined by his awakening, which is conceived of as a definitive, clear-cut event with specific characteristics. Enlightenment is a “thing,” a recognizable state of mind or change of consciousness, or perhaps a similar kind of process, which may be beyond the grasp of words, but is nevertheless confidently (...)
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    Psychological Solutions to Metaphysical Problems in the Pārāyaṇa-Vagga.Eviatar Shulman - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (2):506-530.
    The understanding of early Buddhist philosophy oscillates between two binary opposed interpretations. On the one hand we find a metaphysical system that hinges on the doctrine of karma and the attempt to exit saṃsāra. Here the Buddha is thought to attain a transcendence that takes place in some indescribable existential or ontological realm. On the other hand we encounter an empirical approach that sees the Buddha as a thinker who denied the credibility of metaphysical speculation and who advocated the relinquishing (...)
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