Results for 'Expression'

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  1. Self-Expression.Mitchell S. Green - 2007 - Oxford University Press.
    Mitchell S. Green presents a systematic philosophical study of self-expression - a pervasive phenomenon of the everyday life of humans and other species, which has received scant attention in its own right. He explores the ways in which self-expression reveals our states of thought, feeling, and experience, and he defends striking new theses concerning a wide range of fascinating topics: our ability to perceive emotion in others, artistic expression, empathy, expressive language, meaning, facial expression, and speech (...)
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  2.  1
    The Expression of Emotions in Man and Animals.Charles Darwin - 1872 - John Murray.
    Darwin discusses why different muscles are brought into action under different emotions and how particular animals have adapted for association with man.
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  3.  64
    Meaning, Expression and Thought.Wayne A. Davis - 2002 - Cambridge University Press.
    This philosophical treatise on the foundations of semantics is a systematic effort to clarify, deepen, and defend the classical doctrine that words are conventional signs of mental states, principally thoughts and ideas, and that meaning consists in their expression. This expression theory of meaning is developed by carrying out the Gricean program, explaining what it is for words to have meaning in terms of speaker meaning, and what it is for a speaker to mean something in terms of (...)
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  4.  8
    Expression and the Inner.David H. Finkelstein - 2003 - Harvard University Press.
    At least since Descartes, philosophers have been interested in the special knowledge or authority that we exhibit when we speak about our own thoughts, attitudes, and feelings. This book contends that even the best work in contemporary philosophy of mind fails to account for this sort of knowledge or authority because it does not pay the right sort of attention to the notion of expression. What's at stake is not only how to understand self-knowledge and first-person authority, but also (...)
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  5.  7
    Expressing Our Attitudes: Explanation and Expression in Ethics.Mark Andrew Schroeder - 2015 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Expressing Our Attitudes pulls together over a decade of work by Mark Schroeder, one of the leading figures in contemporary metaethics. Two new and seven previously published papers weave treatments of propositions, truth, and the attitudes together with detailed development of competing alternative expressivist frameworks and discussion of their relative advantages. A substantial new introduction both offers new arguments of its own, and provides a map to reading these essays as a unified argument.Along with its sister volume, Explaining the Reasons (...)
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  6.  17
    Expression and Meaning: Studies in the Theory of Speech Acts.John Rogers Searle - 1979 - Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press.
    John Searle's Speech Acts made a highly original contribution to work in the philosophy of language. Expression and Meaning is a direct successor, concerned to develop and refine the account presented in Searle's earlier work, and to extend its application to other modes of discourse such as metaphor, fiction, reference, and indirect speech arts. Searle also presents a rational taxonomy of types of speech acts and explores the relation between the meanings of sentences and the contexts of their utterance. (...)
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  7.  27
    Interpreting the Personal: Expression and the Formation of Feelings.Sue Campbell - 1997 - Ithaca: Cornell University Press.
    Sue Campbell reinstates the personal as an important dimension in analytic philosophy of mind. She argues that the category of feelings has a unique role in psychological explanation: the expression of feelings is the attempt to communicate personal significance. To develop a model for affective meaning, the author moves attention away from the classic emotions to feelings that are more personal, inchoate, and idiosyncratic.
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  8.  8
    The Expressiveness of the Body and the Divergence of Greek and Chinese Medicine.Shigehisa Kuriyama - 1999 - Zone Books.
    The Expressiveness of the Body meditates on the contrasts between the human body described in classical Greek medicine and the body as envisaged by physicians in ancient China.
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  9. Misleading Expressions: The Brentano-Ryle Connection.Arnaud Dewalque - 2021 - In Arnaud Dewalque, Charlotte Gauvry & Richard Sébastien (eds.), Philosophy of Language in the Brentano School. Basingstoke, Royaume-Uni: Palgrave Macmillan. pp. 95-118.
    This chapter argues that Gilbert Ryle’s account of misleading expressions, which is rightly considered a milestone in the history of analytic philosophy, is continuous with Brentano’s. Not only did they identify roughly the same classes of misleading expressions, but their analyses are driven by a form of ontological parsimony which sharply contrasts with rival views in the Brentano School, like those of Meinong and Husserl. Section 1 suggests that Ryle and Brentano share a similar notion of analysis. Section 2 spells (...)
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  10.  70
    Expression of Nonconscious Knowledge Via Ideomotor Actions.Hélène L. Gauchou, Ronald A. Rensink & Sidney Fels - 2012 - Consciousness and Cognition 21 (2):976-982.
    Ideomotor actions are behaviours that are unconsciously initiated and express a thought rather than a response to a sensory stimulus. The question examined here is whether ideomotor actions can also express nonconscious knowledge. We investigated this via the use of implicit long-term semantic memory, which is not available to conscious recall. We compared accuracy of answers to yes/no questions using both volitional report and ideomotor response . Results show that when participants believed they knew the answer, responses in the two (...)
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  11. Self Expressions: Mind, Morals, and the Meaning of Life.Owen J. Flanagan - 1996 - Oxford University Press.
    Human beings have the unique ability to consciously reflect on the nature of the self. But reflection has its costs. We can ask what the self is, but as David Hume pointed out, the self, once reflected upon, may be nowhere to be found. The favored view is that we are material beings living in the material world. But if so, a host of destabilizing questions surface. If persons are just a sophisticated sort of animal, then what sense is there (...)
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  12. Speaking My Mind: Expression and Self-Knowledge.Dorit Bar-On - 2004 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Dorit Bar-On develops and defends a novel view of avowals and self-knowledge. Drawing on resources from the philosophy of language, the theory of action, epistemology, and the philosophy of mind, she offers original and systematic answers to many long-standing questions concerning our ability to know our own minds. We are all very good at telling what states of mind we are in at a given moment. When it comes to our own present states of mind, what we say goes; an (...)
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  13.  51
    The Expressive Power of Truth.Martin Fischer & Leon Horsten - 2015 - Review of Symbolic Logic 8 (2):345-369.
    There are two perspectives from which formal theories can be viewed. On the one hand, one can take a theory to be about some privileged models. On the other hand, one can take all models of a theory to be on a par. In contrast with what is usually done in philosophical debates, we adopt the latter viewpoint. Suppose that from this perspective we want to add an adequate truth predicate to a background theory. Then on the one hand the (...)
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  14.  5
    Expressing the World: Skepticism, Wittgenstein, and Heidegger.Anthony Rudd - 2003 - Open Court.
    In this book, Anthony Rudd flouts convention in his approach to the problem of skepticism. He brings Wittgensteinian and analytic philosophy into dialogue with Heidegger's work and the continental tradition, schools of thought that are normally considered antipathetic to one another. Drawing heavily on some often neglected aspects of Wittgenstein and Heidegger, Professor Rudd argues that so long as we consider our knowledge of external realities to be a purely intellectual matter, skepticism will remain irrefutable. Genuine knowledge can be established, (...)
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  15. Expressive Arts Education and Therapy: Discoveries in a Dance Theatre Lab Through Creative Process-Based Research.Markus Scott-Alexander - 2020 - Brill | Sense.
    In _Expressive Arts Education and Therapy_ we see how the creative process in a dance theatre lab evolved into a Creative Process-based Research project that included the director/choreographer and participants in a collaborative sense-making project.
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  16. Meaning, Expression and Thought.Wayne A. Davis - 2002 - Cambridge University Press.
    This philosophical treatise on the foundations of semantics is a systematic effort to clarify, deepen and defend the classical doctrine that words are conventional signs of mental states, principally thoughts and ideas, and that meaning consists in their expression. This expression theory of meaning is developed by carrying out the Gricean programme, explaining what it is for words to have meaning in terms of speaker meaning, and what it is for a speaker to mean something in terms of (...)
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  17. Expressives and the Theory of Bias.Ludovic Soutif & Carlos Mario Márquez Sosa - 2020 - In Eleonora Orlando & Andrés Saab (eds.), Slurs and Expressivity: Semantics and Beyond. Lanham, MD 20706, USA: pp. 95-116.
    Modelling the semantic behaviour of expressives in such a way that one be in a position to predict some, at least, of their distinctive properties is the purpose of any theory aiming at accounting for so-called expressive meaning. In this paper, we review a semantic framework coined by its author the Theory of Bias. We show that the two-tiered account of the meaning of expressives (notably, sentential interjections and pejorative epithets) favored by this framework has the resources to provide a (...)
     
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  18.  40
    The Expressive Import of Degradation and Decay in Contemporary Art.Sherri Irvin - 2022 - In Peter N. Miller & Soon Kai Poh (eds.), Conserving Active Matter. New York City: Bard Graduate Center. pp. 65-79.
    Many contemporary artworks include active matter along with rules for conservation that are designed to either facilitate or prevent that matter’s degradation or decay. I discuss the mechanisms through which actual or potential states of material decay contribute to the work’s expressive import. Nelson Goodman and Catherine Elgin introduce the concepts of literal and metaphorical exemplification, which are critical to expression: a work literally exemplifies a property when it both possesses and highlights that property, and it metaphorically exemplifies a (...)
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  19.  10
    Emotional Expression and Vocabulary Learning in Adults and Children.Fabrice Clément, Stéphane Bernard, Didier Grandjean & David Sander - 2013 - Cognition and Emotion 27 (3):539-548.
  20. Self-Expression: A Deep Self Theory of Moral Responsibility.Chandra Sripada - 2016 - Philosophical Studies 173 (5):1203-1232.
    According to Dewey, we are responsible for our conduct because it is “ourselves objectified in action”. This idea lies at the heart of an increasingly influential deep self approach to moral responsibility. Existing formulations of deep self views have two major problems: They are often underspecified, and they tend to understand the nature of the deep self in excessively rationalistic terms. Here I propose a new deep self theory of moral responsibility called the Self-Expression account that addresses these issues. (...)
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  21.  20
    Angry Expressions Strengthen the Encoding and Maintenance of Face Identity Representations in Visual Working Memory.Margaret C. Jackson, David E. J. Linden & Jane E. Raymond - 2014 - Cognition and Emotion 28 (2):278-297.
  22.  59
    The Expression of Emotion: Philosophical, Psychological and Legal Perspectives.Catharine Abell & Joel Smith (eds.) - 2016 - Cambridge University Press.
    The Expression of Emotion collects cutting-edge essays on emotional expression written by leading philosophers, psychologists, and legal theorists. It highlights areas of interdisciplinary research interest, including facial expression, expressive action, and the role of both normativity and context in emotion perception. Whilst philosophical discussion of emotional expression has addressed the nature of expression and its relation to action theory, psychological work on the topic has focused on the specific mechanisms underpinning different facial expressions and their (...)
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  23.  53
    Expressive Inquiry and Practical Reasoning.Roberto Frega - 2009 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 23 (4):307-327.
  24. The Express Knowledge Account of Assertion.John Turri - 2011 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 89 (1):37-45.
    Many philosophers favour the simple knowledge account of assertion, which says you may assert something only if you know it. The simple account is true but importantly incomplete. I defend a more informative thesis, namely, that you may assert something only if your assertion expresses knowledge. I call this 'the express knowledge account of assertion', which I argue better handles a wider range of cases while at the same time explaining the simple knowledge account's appeal. §1 introduces some new data (...)
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  25. Expression and Meaning: Studies in the Theory of Speech Acts.John Rogers Searle - 1979 - Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press.
    John Searle's Speech Acts made a highly original contribution to work in the philosophy of language. Expression and Meaning is a direct successor, concerned to develop and refine the account presented in Searle's earlier work, and to extend its application to other modes of discourse such as metaphor, fiction, reference, and indirect speech arts. Searle also presents a rational taxonomy of types of speech acts and explores the relation between the meanings of sentences and the contexts of their utterance. (...)
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  26. Really Expressive Presuppositions and How to Block Them.Teresa Marques & Manuel García-Carpintero - 2020 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 97 (1):138-158.
    Kaplan (1999) argued that a different dimension of expressive meaning (“use-conditional”, as opposed to truth-conditional) is required to characterize the meaning of pejoratives, including slurs and racial epithets. Elaborating on this, writers have argued that the expressive meaning of pejoratives and slurs is either a conventional implicature (Potts 2007) or a presupposition (Macià 2002 and 2014, Schlenker 2007, Cepollaro and Stojanovic 2016). We argue that an expressive presuppositional theory accounts well for the data, but that expressive presuppositions are not just (...)
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  27.  5
    Expression in Movement & the Arts: A Philosophical Enquiry.David Best - 1974 - Lepus Books.
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  28.  4
    Tracing Expression in Merleau-Ponty: Aesthetics, Philosophy of Biology, and Ontology.Véronique M. Fóti - 2013 - Northwestern University Press.
    The French philosopher Renaud Barbaras remarked that late in Maurice Merleau-Ponty’s career, “The phenomenology of perception fulfills itself as a philosophy of expression.” In _Tracing Expression in Merleau-Ponty: Aesthetics, Philosophy of Biology, and Ontology, _Véronique M. Fóti_ _addresses the guiding yet neglected theme of expression in Merleau-Ponty’s thought. She traces Merleau-Ponty’s ideas about how individuals express creative or artistic impulses through his three essays on aesthetics, his engagement with animality and the “new biology” in the second of (...)
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  29. Expressing Permission.William B. Starr - 2016 - Semantics and Linguistic Theory 26:325-349.
    This paper proposes a semantics for free choice permission that explains both the non-classical behavior of modals and disjunction in sentences used to grant permission, and their classical behavior under negation. It also explains why permissions can expire when new information comes in and why free choice arises even when modals scope under disjunction. On the proposed approach, deontic modals update preference orderings, and connectives operate on these updates rather than propositions. The success of this approach stems from its capacity (...)
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  30. Mind the Gap: Expressing Affect with Hyperbole and Hyperbolic Compounds.Mihaela Popa-Wyatt - 2020 - John Benjamins.
    Hyperbole is traditionally understood as exaggeration. Instead, in this paper, we shall define it not just in terms of its form, but in terms of its effects and its purpose. Specifically, we characterize its form as a shift of magnitude along a scale of measurement. In terms of its effect, it uses this magnitude shift to make the target property more salient. The purpose of hyperbole is to express with colour and force that the target property is either greater or (...)
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  31.  10
    Perception, Expression, and History: The Social Phenomenology of Maurice Merleau-Ponty.John O'Neill - 1970 - Evanston: Northwestern University Press.
    I / The Structures of Behavior MERLEAU-PONTY'S ANALYSIS of the structures of behavior proceeds by means of a critical confrontation of the realism of ...
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  32.  81
    The Expressive Dimension.Christopher Potts - 2007 - Theoretical Linguistics 33 (2):165-198.
    Expressives like damn and bastard have, when uttered, an immediate and powerful impact on the context. They are performative, often destructively so. They are revealing of the perspective from which the utterance is made, and they can have a dramatic impact on how current and future utterances are perceived. This, despite the fact that speakers are invariably hard-pressed to articulate what they mean. I develop a general theory of these volatile, indispensable meanings. The theory is built around a class of (...)
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  33.  27
    Expressive Truth: An Argument for Literary Philosophy.Jessica Wahman - 2006 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 20 (2):77-84.
    Philosophy has become trapped by the belief that precision is our surest path to knowledge. It is my aim to challenge this assumption and to affirm in its place a wide variety of means by which we may “speak” philosophically. Drawing on George Santayana’s ontological realm of truth and his concept of literary psychology, I will argue that the varieties of human expression, in their relationship to truth, are not fundamental differences in kind but exist on a continuum of (...)
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  34.  78
    Expression and Meaning: Studies in the Theory of Speech Acts.Brian Loar - 1979 - Philosophical Review 91 (3):488-493.
    John Searle's Speech Acts made a highly original contribution to work in the philosophy of language. Expression and Meaning is a direct successor, concerned to develop and refine the account presented in Searle's earlier work, and to extend its application to other modes of discourse such as metaphor, fiction, reference, and indirect speech arts. Searle also presents a rational taxonomy of types of speech acts and explores the relation between the meanings of sentences and the contexts of their utterance. (...)
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  35. Plutarch's Advice on Keeping Well a Lecture Delivered at the International Congress of Psychopathology of Expression and Art Therapy Which Met in September 2000 at Mclean Hospital in Belmont, Massachusetts, Together with an Anthology of Relevant Texts From Plutarch's Works.Constantine Cavarnos & American Society of Psychopathology of Expression - 2001
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  36. Art, Expression, and Beauty.Arthur Berndtson - 1969 - Holt, Rinehart and Winston.
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  37. The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals.CHARLES DARWIN - 1955
     
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  38.  10
    Expressed Turnover Intention: Alternate Method for Knowing Turnover Intention and Eradicating Common Method Bias.Ghulam Abid & Tahira Hassan Butt - 2017 - International Letters of Social and Humanistic Sciences 78:18-26.
    Publication date: 30 August 2017 Source: Author: Ghulam Abid, Tahira Hassan Butt Employees are the building blocks and valuable assets in an organization. Organizational researchers and practitioners have shown a burgeoning attention to satisfy and retain key performer as the cost of leaving a job is very high for the employing organizations. Discovering turnover intention in its formation stages is very crucial, not only to resist its’ piled up effect but also to control the actual turnover in the future. Most (...)
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  39. Do Indicative Conditionals Express Propositions?Daniel Rothschild - 2013 - Noûs 47 (1):49-68.
    Discusses how to capture the link between the probability of indicative conditionals and conditional probability using a classical semantics for conditionals.
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  40. Musical Meaning and Expression.Stephen Davies - 1994 - Cornell University Press.
    But what does music mean, and how does it mean?Stephen Davies addresses these questions in this sophisticated and knowledgeable overview of current theories in ...
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  41. Expressing Disagreement: A Presuppositional Indexical Contextualist Relativist Account.Dan López de Sa - 2015 - Erkenntnis 80 (1):153-165.
    Many domains, notably the one involving predicates of personal taste, present the phenomenon of apparent faultless disagreement. Contextualism is a characteristically moderate implementation of the relativistic attempt to endorse such appearances. According to an often-voiced objection, although it straightforwardly accounts for the faultlessness, contextualism fails to respect “facts about disagreement.” With many other recent contributors to the debate, I contend that the notion of disagreement—“genuine,” “real,” “substantive,” “robust” disagreement—is indeed very flexible, and in particular can be constituted by contrasting attitudes. (...)
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  42.  10
    Slurs and Expressivity: Semantics and Beyond.Eleonora Orlando & Andrés Saab (eds.) - 2021 - Lexington Books.
    This book provides analysis of the expressive aspects of slur-words and their impact in practices of linguistic communication usually related to the discrimination or segregation of certain human groups.
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  43.  22
    Gender and Emotion Expression: A Developmental Contextual Perspective.Tara M. Chaplin - 2015 - Emotion Review 7 (1):14-21.
    Small but significant gender differences in emotion expressions have been reported for adults, with women showing greater emotional expressivity, especially for positive emotions and internalizing negative emotions such as sadness. But when, developmentally, do these gender differences emerge? And what developmental and contextual factors influence their emergence? This article describes a developmental bio-psycho-social model of gender differences in emotion expression in childhood. Prior empirical research supporting the model, at least with mostly White middle-class U.S. samples of youth, is presented. (...)
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  44. The Expressive Function of Punishment.Joel Feinberg - 1965 - The Monist 49 (3):397-423.
  45. Expression And Expressiveness In Art.Jenefer Robinson - 2007 - Postgraduate Journal of Aesthetics 4 (2):19-41.
    The concept of expression in the arts is Janus-faced. On the one hand expression is an author-centered notion: many Romantic poets, painters, and musicians thought of themselves as pouring our or ex-pressing their own emotions in their artworks. And on the other hand, expression is an audience-centered notion, the communication of what is expressed by an author to members of an audience. Typically the word “expression” is used for the author-centered aspect of expression as a (...)
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  46. Rethinking Expressive Theories of Punishment: Why Denunciation is a Better Bet Than Communication or Pure Expression.Bill Wringe - 2017 - Philosophical Studies 174 (3):681-708.
    Many philosophers hold that punishment has an expressive dimension. Advocates of expressive theories have different views about what makes punishment expressive, what kinds of mental states and what kinds of claims are, or legitimately can be expressed in punishment, and to what kind of audience or recipients, if any, punishment might express whatever it expresses. I shall argue that in order to assess the plausibility of an expressivist approach to justifying punishment we need to pay careful attention to whether the (...)
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  47.  86
    Imagery, Expression, and Metaphor.Mitchell Green - 2017 - Philosophical Studies 174 (1):33--46.
    Metaphorical utterances are construed as falling into two broad categories, in one of which are cases amenable to analysis in terms of semantic content, speaker meaning, and satisfaction conditions, and where image-construction is permissible but not mandatory. I call these image-permitting metaphors, and contrast them with image-demanding metaphors comprising a second category and whose understanding mandates the construction of a mental image. This construction, I suggest, is spontaneous, is not restricted to visual imagery, and its result is typically somatically marked (...)
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  48.  82
    Expressive‐assertivism.Daniel R. Boisvert - 2008 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 89 (2):169-203.
    : Hybrid metaethical theories attempt to incorporate essential elements of expressivism and cognitivism, and thereby to accrue the benefits of both. Hybrid theories are often defended in part by appeals to slurs and other pejoratives, which have both expressive and cognitivist features. This paper takes far more seriously the analogy between pejoratives and moral predicates. It explains how pejoratives work, identifies the features that allow pejoratives to do that work, and models a theory of moral predicates on those features. The (...)
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  49. Meaning, Expression, and Thought.Wayne A. Davis - 2008 - Philosophical Studies 137 (3):417-426.
    In part 4 of Meaning, Expression, and Thought, Davis rejects what he calls Fregean ideational theories, according to which the meaning of an expression is an idea; and then presents his own account, which states that, e.g., the meaning of 'Primzahl' in German is the property of meaning prime number. Before casting doubt on the latter ontology of meanings, I come to Frege's defence by pointing out that he was not an advocate of the position Davis named after (...)
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  50. Expressive Association After Dale.David E. Bernstein - 2004 - Social Philosophy and Policy 21 (2):195-214.
    The right to join with other people to promote a particular outlook, known as the right of expressive association, is a necessary adjunct to the right of freedom of speech, which is protected by the First Amendment of the United States Constitution. Freedom of speech would be of little practical consequence if the government could suppress ideas by bluntly prohibiting individuals from gathering with others who share their perspective. Freedom of expression must consist of more than the right to (...)
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