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Ezekiel J. Emanuel [85]Ezekiel Emanuel [16]
  1.  63
    Principles of Biomedical Ethics.Ezekiel J. Emanuel, Tom L. Beauchamp & James F. Childress - 1995 - Hastings Center Report 25 (4):37.
    Book reviewed in this article: Principles of Biomedical Ethics. By Tom L. Beauchamp and James F. Childress.
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  2. Principles for allocation of scarce medical interventions.Govind Persad, Alan Wertheimer & Ezekiel J. Emanuel - 2009 - The Lancet 373 (9661):423--431.
    Allocation of very scarce medical interventions such as organs and vaccines is a persistent ethical challenge. We evaluate eight simple allocation principles that can be classified into four categories: treating people equally, favouring the worst-off, maximising total benefits, and promoting and rewarding social usefulness. No single principle is sufficient to incorporate all morally relevant considerations and therefore individual principles must be combined into multiprinciple allocation systems. We evaluate three systems: the United Network for Organ Sharing points systems, quality-adjusted life-years, and (...)
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  3. Fair Allocation of Scarce Medical Resources in the Time of Covid-19.Ezekiel J. Emanuel, Govind Persad, Ross Upshur, Beatriz Thome, Michael Parker, Aaron Glickman, Cathy Zhang & Connor Boyle - 2020 - New England Journal of Medicine 45:10.1056/NEJMsb2005114.
    Four ethical values — maximizing benefits, treating equally, promoting and rewarding instrumental value, and giving priority to the worst off — yield six specific recommendations for allocating medical resources in the Covid-19 pandemic: maximize benefits; prioritize health workers; do not allocate on a first-come, first-served basis; be responsive to evidence; recognize research participation; and apply the same principles to all Covid-19 and non–Covid-19 patients.
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  4. An ethical framework for global vaccine allocation.Ezekiel J. Emanuel, Govind Persad, Adam Kern, Allen E. Buchanan, Cecile Fabre, Daniel Halliday, Joseph Heath, Lisa M. Herzog, R. J. Leland, Ephrem T. Lemango, Florencia Luna, Matthew McCoy, Ole F. Norheim, Trygve Ottersen, G. Owen Schaefer, Kok-Chor Tan, Christopher Heath Wellman, Jonathan Wolff & Henry S. Richardson - 2020 - Science 1:DOI: 10.1126/science.abe2803.
    In this article, we propose the Fair Priority Model for COVID-19 vaccine distribution, and emphasize three fundamental values we believe should be considered when distributing a COVID-19 vaccine among countries: Benefiting people and limiting harm, prioritizing the disadvantaged, and equal moral concern for all individuals. The Priority Model addresses these values by focusing on mitigating three types of harms caused by COVID-19: death and permanent organ damage, indirect health consequences, such as health care system strain and stress, as well as (...)
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  5.  21
    Ethical Responsibilities for Companies That Process Personal Data.Matthew S. McCoy, Anita L. Allen, Katharina Kopp, Michelle M. Mello, D. J. Patil, Pilar Ossorio, Steven Joffe & Ezekiel J. Emanuel - 2023 - American Journal of Bioethics 23 (11):11-23.
    It has become increasingly difficult for individuals to exercise meaningful control over the personal data they disclose to companies or to understand and track the ways in which that data is exchanged and used. These developments have led to an emerging consensus that existing privacy and data protection laws offer individuals insufficient protections against harms stemming from current data practices. However, an effective and ethically justified way forward remains elusive. To inform policy in this area, we propose the Ethical Data (...)
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  6. The Obligation to Participate in Biomedical Research.G. Owen Schaefer, Ezekiel J. Emanuel & Alan Wertheimer - 2009 - Journal of the American Medical Association 302 (1):67-72.
    The current prevailing view is that participation in biomedical research is above and beyond the call of duty. While some commentators have offered reasons against this, we propose a novel public goods argument for an obligation to participate in biomedical research. Biomedical knowledge is a public good, available to any individual even if that individual does not contribute to it. Participation in research is a critical way to support an important public good. Consequently, all have a duty to participate. The (...)
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  7. The Oxford textbook of clinical research ethics.Ezekiel J. Emanuel (ed.) - 2008 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Comprehensive in scope and research, this book will be a crucial resource for researchers in the medical sciences, as well as teachers and students alike.
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  8.  81
    Fairly Prioritizing Groups for Access to COVID-19 Vaccines.Govind Persad, Monica E. Peek & Ezekiel J. Emanuel - 2020 - JAMA 1 (16).
    Initial vaccine allocations for the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) will be limited. It is crucial to assess the ethical values associated with different methods of allocation, as well as important scientific and practical questions. This Viewpoint identifies three ethical values, benefiting people and limiting harm; prioritizing disadvantaged populations; and equal concern for all. It then explains why these values support prioritizing three groups: health care workers; other essential workers and people in high-transmission settings; and people with medical vulnerabilities associated with (...)
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  9. The importance of getting the ethics right in a pandemic treaty.G. Owen Schaefer, Caesar A. Atuire, Sharon Kaur, Michael Parker, Govind Persad, Maxwell J. Smith, Ross Upshur & Ezekiel Emanuel - 2023 - The Lancet Infectious Diseases 23 (11):e489 - e496.
    The COVID-19 pandemic revealed numerous weaknesses in pandemic preparedness and response, including underfunding, inadequate surveillance, and inequitable distribution of countermeasures. To overcome these weaknesses for future pandemics, WHO released a zero draft of a pandemic treaty in February, 2023, and subsequently a revised bureau's text in May, 2023. COVID-19 made clear that pandemic prevention, preparedness, and response reflect choices and value judgements. These decisions are therefore not a purely scientific or technical exercise, but are fundamentally grounded in ethics. The latest (...)
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  10. What are the obligations of pharmaceutical companies in a global health emergency?Ezekiel J. Emanuel, Allen Buchanan, Shuk Ying Chan, Cécile Fabre, Daniel Halliday, Joseph Heath, Lisa Herzog, R. J. Leland, Matthew S. McCoy, Ole F. Norheim, Carla Saenz, G. Owen Schaefer, Kok-Chor Tan, Christopher Heath Wellman, Jonathan Wolff & Govind Persad - 2021 - Lancet 398 (10304):1015.
    All parties involved in researching, developing, manufacturing, and distributing COVID-19 vaccines need guidance on their ethical obligations. We focus on pharmaceutical companies' obligations because their capacities to research, develop, manufacture, and distribute vaccines make them uniquely placed for stemming the pandemic. We argue that an ethical approach to COVID-19 vaccine production and distribution should satisfy four uncontroversial principles: optimising vaccine production, including development, testing, and manufacturing; fair distribution; sustainability; and accountability. All parties' obligations should be coordinated and mutually consistent. For (...)
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  11.  78
    Undue Inducement: Nonsense on Stilts?Ezekiel J. Emanuel - 2005 - American Journal of Bioethics 5 (5):9-13.
    1. The opinions expressed are the author's own. They do not reflect any position or policy of the National Institutes of Health, Public Health Service, Department of Health and Human Services, or any of the authors affiliated organizations.
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  12. The quality of informed consent: mapping the landscape. A review of empirical data from developing and developed countries.Amulya Mandava, Christine Pace, Benjamin Campbell, Ezekiel Emanuel & Christine Grady - 2012 - Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (6):356-365.
    Objective Some researchers claim that the quality of informed consent of clinical research participants in developing countries is worse than in developed countries. To evaluate this assumption, we reviewed the available data on the quality of consent in both settings. Methods We conducted a comprehensive PubMed search, examined bibliographies and literature reviews, and consulted with international experts on informed consent in order to identify studies published from 1966 to 2010 that used quantitative methods, surveyed participants or parents of paediatric participants (...)
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  13.  94
    Exploitation and developing countries: The ethics of clinical research.Jennifer S. Hawkins & Ezekiel J. Emanuel - 2008 - Princeton, NJ, USA: Princeton Univ Pr.
    This book was inspired originally by the debates at the turn of the century about placebo controlled trials of antiretrovirals in HIV positive pregnant women in developing countries. Moving forward from this one limited example, the book includes several additional controversial cases of clinical research conducted in developing countries, and asks probing philosophical questions about the ethics of such trials. All clinical research by its very nature uses people to acquire generalizable knowledge to help future people. But what sorts of (...)
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  14.  54
    The ends of human life: medical ethics in a liberal polity.Ezekiel J. Emanuel - 1991 - Cambridge: Harvard University Press.
    INTRODUCTION The Questions of Medical Ethics Call him Andrew. His face is gaunt and unshaven but peaceful. His eyelids are gently closed. ...
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  15.  33
    Moral Standards for Research in Developing Countries from "Reasonable Availability" to "Fair Benefits".Maged El Setouhy, Tsiri Agbenyega, Francis Anto, Christine Alexandra Clerk, Kwadwo A. Koram, Michael English, Rashid Juma, Catherine Molyneux, Norbert Peshu, Newton Kumwenda, Joseph Mfutso-Bengu, Malcolm Molyneux, Terrie Taylor, Doumbia Aissata Diarra, Saibou Maiga, Mamadou Sylla, Dione Youssouf, Catherine Olufunke Falade, Segun Gbadegesin, Reidar Lie, Ferdinand Mugusi, David Ngassapa, Julius Ecuru, Ambrose Talisuna, Ezekiel Emanuel, Christine Grady, Elizabeth Higgs, Christopher Plowe, Jeremy Sugarman & David Wendler - 2004 - Hastings Center Report 34 (3):17.
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  16.  93
    An ethical framework for biomedical research.Ezekiel J. Emanuel, David Wendler & C. Grady - 2008 - In The Oxford textbook of clinical research ethics. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 123--135.
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  17.  68
    Ending Concerns About Undue Inducement.Ezekiel J. Emanuel - 2004 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 32 (1):100-105.
    For decades, worries about undue inducement have Pervaded clinical research, and are especially common when research is accompanied by payment or conducted in developing countries. Few ethical judgments carry as much moral opprobrium or are thought to undermine the ethical soundness of a clinical trial as thoroughly as undue inducement. Indeed, the admonition to prevent undue inducement is one of the few explicit instructions in the Common Rules requirements for informed consent.Despite their long history and pervasiveness, charges of undue inducement (...)
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  18. Ethical considerations of offering benefits to COVID-19 vaccine recipients.Govind Persad & Ezekiel J. Emanuel - 2021 - JAMA 326 (3):221-222.
    We argue that the ethical case for instituting vaccine benefit programs is justified by 2 widely recognized values: (1) reducing overall harm from COVID-19 and (2) protecting disadvantaged individuals. We then explain why they do not coerce, exploit, wrongfully distort decision-making, corrupt vaccination's moral significance, wrong those who have already been vaccinated, or destroy willingness to become vaccinated. However, their cost impacts and their effects on public perception of vaccines should be evaluated.
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  19. Empirical issues in informed consent for research.James Flory, David Wendler & Ezekiel Emanuel - 2008 - In Ezekiel J. Emanuel (ed.), The Oxford textbook of clinical research ethics. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 645--60.
     
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  20.  43
    On the Ethics of Vaccine Nationalism: The Case for the Fair Priority for Residents Framework.Ezekiel J. Emanuel, Allen Buchanan, Shuk Ying Chan, Cécile Fabre, Daniel Halliday, R. J. Leland, Florencia Luna, Matthew S. McCoy, Ole F. Norheim, G. Owen Schaefer, Kok-Chor Tan & Christopher Heath Wellman - 2021 - Ethics and International Affairs 35 (4):543-562.
    COVID-19 vaccines are likely to be scarce for years to come. Many countries, from India to the U.K., have demonstrated vaccine nationalism. What are the ethical limits to this vaccine nationalism? Neither extreme nationalism nor extreme cosmopolitanism is ethically justifiable. Instead, we propose the fair priority for residents framework, in which governments can retain COVID-19 vaccine doses for their residents only to the extent that they are needed to maintain a noncrisis level of mortality while they are implementing reasonable public (...)
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  21.  32
    Ending Concerns about Undue Inducement.Ezekiel J. Emanuel - 2004 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 32 (1):100-105.
    For decades, worries about undue inducement have Pervaded clinical research, and are especially common when research is accompanied by payment or conducted in developing countries. Few ethical judgments carry as much moral opprobrium or are thought to undermine the ethical soundness of a clinical trial as thoroughly as undue inducement. Indeed, the admonition to prevent undue inducement is one of the few explicit instructions in the Common Rules requirements for informed consent.Despite their long history and pervasiveness, charges of undue inducement (...)
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  22.  17
    The Right Way to Approach Conference Site Selection.Merjan Ozisik, Johan Dellgren & Ezekiel Emanuel - 2024 - American Journal of Bioethics 24 (4):29-31.
    Where should we meet? This may seem like a trivial decision, mostly focused on convenience. However, location can represent integral values, attitudes, and priorities. Especially when the meeting i...
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  23. The Current State of Medical School Education in Bioethics, Health Law, and Health Economics.Govind C. Persad, Linden Elder, Laura Sedig, Leonardo Flores & Ezekiel J. Emanuel - 2008 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (1):89-94.
    Current challenges in medical practice, research, and administration demand physicians who are familiar with bioethics, health law, and health economics. Curriculum directors at American Association of Medical Colleges-affiliated medical schools were sent confidential surveys requesting the number of required hours of the above subjects and the years in which they were taught, as well as instructor names. The number of relevant publications since 1990 for each named instructor was assessed by a PubMed search.In sum, teaching in all three subjects combined (...)
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  24.  69
    Ethical and regulatory aspects of clinical research: readings and commentary.Ezekiel J. Emanuel (ed.) - 2003 - Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.
    All investigators funded by the National Institutes of Health are now required to receive training about the ethics of clinical research. Based on a course taught by the editors at NIH, Ethical and Regulatory Aspects of Clinical Research is the first book designed to help investigators meet this new requirement. The book begins with the history of human subjects research and guidelines instituted since World War II. It then covers various stages and components of the clinical trial process: designing the (...)
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  25.  71
    Global Health Priority-Setting: Beyond Cost-Effectiveness.Ole F. Norheim, Ezekiel J. Emanuel & Joseph Millum (eds.) - 2019 - Oxford University Press.
    Global health is at a crossroads. The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development has come with ambitious targets for health and health services worldwide. To reach these targets, many more billions of dollars need to be spent on health. However, development assistance for health has plateaued and domestic funding on health in most countries is growing at rates too low to close the financing gap. National and international decision-makers face tough choices about how scarce health care resources should be spent. Should (...)
  26. The Case for Resource Sensitivity: Why It Is Ethical to Provide Cheaper, Less Effective Treatments in Global Health.Govind C. Persad & Ezekiel J. Emanuel - 2017 - Hastings Center Report 47 (5):17-24.
    We consider an ethical dilemma in global health: is it ethically acceptable to provide some patients cheaper treatments that are less effective or more toxic than the treatments other patients receive? We argue that it is ethical to consider local resource constraints when deciding what interventions to provide. The provision of cheaper, less effective health care is frequently the most effective way of promoting health and realizing the ethical values of utility, equality, and priority to the worst off.
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  27.  71
    The Ethics of COVID-19 Immunity-Based Licenses (“Immunity Passports”).Govind Persad & Ezekiel J. Emanuel - 2020 - Journal of the American Medical Association:doi:10.1001/jama.2020.8102.
    Certifications of immunity are sometimes called “immunity passports” but are better conceptualized as immunity-based licenses. Such policies raise important questions about fairness, stigma, and counterproductive incentives but could also further individual freedom and improve public health. Immunity licenses should not be evaluated against a baseline of normalcy, ie, uninfected free movement. Rather, they should be compared to the alternatives of enforcing strict public health restrictions for many months or permitting activities that could spread infection, both of which exacerbate inequalities and (...)
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  28.  41
    Protecting Communities in Research: Current Guidelines and Limits of Extrapolation.Charles Weijer, Gary Goldsand & Ezekiel J. Emanuel - unknown
    As genetic research increasingly focuses on communities, there have been calls for extending research protections to them. We critically examine guidelines developed to protect aboriginal communities and consider their applicability to other communities. These guidelines are based on a model of researcher-community partnership and span the phases of a research project, from protocol development to publication. The complete list of 23 protections may apply to those few non-aboriginal communities, such as the Amish, that are highly cohesive. Although some protections may (...)
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  29.  80
    Fair Allocation of GLP-1 and Dual GLP-1-GIP Receptor Agonists.Ezekiel J. Emanuel, Johan L. Dellgren, Matthew S. McCoy & Govind Persad - forthcoming - New England Journal of Medicine.
    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists, such as semaglutide, and dual GLP-1 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) receptor agonists, such as tirzepatide, have been found to be effective for treating obesity and diabetes, significantly reducing weight and the risk or predicted risk of adverse cardiovascular events. There is a global shortage of these medications that could last several years and raises questions about how limited supplies should be allocated. We propose a fair-allocation framework that enables evaluation of the ethics of current (...)
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  30.  32
    Research on stored biological samples: the views of Ugandans.David Wendler, Christine Pace, Ambrose O. Talisuna, Faustine Maiso, Christine Grady & Ezekiel Emanuel - 2005 - IRB: Ethics & Human Research 27 (2):1.
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  31.  21
    The Ends of Human Life: Medical Ethics in a Liberal Polity.Norman Daniels, Troyen A. Brennan & Ezekiel J. Emanuel - 1992 - Hastings Center Report 22 (6):41.
    Book reviewed in this article: Just Doctoring: Medical Ethics in the Liberal State. By Troyen A. Brennan. The Ends of Human Life: Medical Ethics in a Liberal Polity. By Ezekiel J. Emanuel.
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  32.  30
    Comprehension and Informed Consent: Assessing the Effect of a Short Consent Form.Leanne Stunkel, Meredith Benson, Louise McLellan, Ninet Sinaii, Gabriella Bedarida, Ezekiel Emanuel & Christine Grady - 2010 - IRB: Ethics & Human Research 32 (4):1.
    The objective of this study—a substudy to a phase I bioequivalence study—was to compare the effect of standard and concise consent forms on research volunteers’ comprehension of and satisfaction with consent forms, as well as to assess the effect of select volunteer characteristics, such as financial motivations to participate in research, on their comprehension. A 36-item questionnaire measured volunteers’ comprehension, satisfaction, and motivations for participation. Volunteers were randomized to the standard Pfizer consent form or a concise, easier-to-read form. We approached (...)
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  33.  83
    Four Paradigms of Clinical Research and Research Oversight.Ezekiel J. Emanuel & Christine Grady - 2007 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 16 (1):82-96.
    The understanding of appropriate ethical protections for participants of biomedical research has not been static. It has evolved over time, with the evolution of biomedical research as well as social values. Since World War II, there have been four major paradigms of research and research oversight operative in the United States. These paradigms incorporate different values and provide different approaches to research oversight and the protection of research participants.
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  34.  19
    Global Justice and Bioethics.Joseph Millum & Ezekiel J. Emanuel (eds.) - 2012 - Oxford University Press.
    This book presents a collection of original essays by leading thinkers in political theory, philosophy, and bioethics on key issues concerning global justice and bioethics. It is the first collection to comprehensively address these pressing theoretical and practical questions about international distributive justice, humans rights, health care and medical research.
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  35.  22
    Key Ethical Concepts and Their Application to COVID-19 Research.Angus Dawson, Ezekiel J. Emanuel, Michael Parker, Maxwell J. Smith & Teck Chuan Voo - 2020 - Public Health Ethics 13 (2):127-132.
    During the WHO-GloPID COVID-19 Global Research and Innovation Forum meeting held in Geneva on the 11th and 12th of February 2020 a number of different ethical concepts were used. This paper briefly states what a number of these concepts mean and how they might be applied to discussions about research during the COVID-19 pandemic and related outbreaks. This paper does not seek to be exhaustive and other ethical concepts are, of course, relevant and important.
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  36.  29
    Clarifying Confusions about Coercion.Jennifer Susan Hawkins & Ezekiel J. Emanuel - 2005 - Hastings Center Report 35 (5):16.
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  37. What is the great benefit of legalizing euthanasia or physican‐assisted suicide?Ezekiel J. Emanuel - 1999 - Ethics 109 (3):629-642.
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  38.  50
    Manufactured scarcity and the allocation of scarce resources–Authors' reply.Ezekiel J. Emanuel & Govind Persad - 2024 - The Lancet 403 (10426):532.
  39. Clarifying confusions about coercion.Jennifer Susan Hawkins & Ezekiel J. Emanuel - 2005 - Hastings Center Report 35 (5):16-19.
    Commentators often claim that medical research subjects are coerced into participating in clinical studies. In recent years, such claims have appeared especially frequently in ethical discussions of research in developing countries. Medical research ethics is more important than ever as we move into the 21st century because worldwide the pharmaceutical industry has grown so much and shows no sign of slowing its growth. This means that more people are involved in medical research today than ever before, and in the future (...)
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  40. Clinical research: Should patients pay to play?Ezekiel J. Emanuel, Steven Joffe, Christine Grady, David Wendler & Govind Persad - 2015 - Science Translational Medicine 7 (298):298ps16.
    We argue that charging people to participate in research is likely to undermine the fundamental ethical bases of clinical research, especially the principles of social value, scientific validity, and fair subject selection.
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  41.  41
    Justice and Managed Care: Four Principles for the Just Allocation of Health Care Resources.Ezekiel J. Emanuel - 2000 - Hastings Center Report 30 (3):8-16.
    The debate about justice and health care has occurred largely at a remove from the institutions it concerns; it has been about our most general moral principles, and about what things we value. This debate has foundered. But if the debate is turned in another direction, toward some moral principles that are widely accepted within those institutions, and toward principles that have to do with control over allocation decisions rather than with actually how to make those decisions, agreement may be (...)
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  42. Should Pediatric Patients Be Prioritized When Rationing Life-Saving Treatments During the COVID-19 Pandemic.Ryan M. Antiel, Farr A. Curlin, Govind Persad, Douglas B. White, Cathy Zhang, Aaron Glickman, Ezekiel J. Emanuel & John Lantos - 2020 - Pediatrics 146 (3):e2020012542.
    Coronavirus disease 2019 can lead to respiratory failure. Some patients require extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support. During the current pandemic, health care resources in some cities have been overwhelmed, and doctors have faced complex decisions about resource allocation. We present a case in which a pediatric hospital caring for both children and adults seeks to establish guidelines for the use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation if there are not enough resources to treat every patient. Experts in critical care, end-of-life care, bioethics, and (...)
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  43.  14
    Medical Ethics in the Era of Managed Care: The Need for Institutional Structures Instead of Principles for Individual Cases.Ezekiel J. Emanuel - 1995 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 6 (4):335-338.
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  44.  45
    Refocusing the responsiveness requirement.Seema Shah, Rebecca Wolitz & Ezekiel Emanuel - 2011 - Bioethics 27 (3):151-159.
    Many guidelines for international research require that studies be responsive to host community health needs or health priorities. Although responsiveness possesses great intuitive and rhetorical appeal, existing conceptions are confusing and difficult to apply. Not only are there few examples of what research the responsiveness requirement permits and what it rejects, but its application can lead to contradictory results. Because of the practical difficulties in applying responsiveness and the danger that misapplying responsiveness could harm the interests of developing countries, we (...)
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  45.  33
    The quality of informed consent in a clinical research study in Thailand.Christine Pace, Ezekiel J. Emanuel, Theshinee Chuenyam, Chris Duncombe, Judith D. Bebchuk, David Wendler, Jorge A. Tavel, Laura A. McNay, Praphan Phanuphak & Heidi P. Forster - 2004 - IRB: Ethics & Human Research 27 (1):9-17.
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  46. The shared ethical framework to allocate scarce medical resources: a lesson from COVID-19.Ezekiel J. Emanuel & Govind Persad - 2023 - The Lancet 401 (10391):1892–1902.
    The COVID-19 pandemic has helped to clarify the fair and equitable allocation of scarce medical resources, both within and among countries. The ethical allocation of such resources entails a three-step process: (1) elucidating the fundamental ethical values for allocation, (2) using these values to delineate priority tiers for scarce resources, and (3) implementing the prioritisation to faithfully realise the fundamental values. Myriad reports and assessments have elucidated five core substantive values for ethical allocation: maximising benefits and minimising harms, mitigating unfair (...)
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  47. Fair domestic allocation of monkeypox virus countermeasures.Govind Persad, R. J. Leland, Trygve Ottersen, Henry S. Richardson, Carla Saenz, G. Owen Schaefer & Ezekiel J. Emanuel - 2023 - Lancet Public Health 8 (5):e378–e382.
    Countermeasures for mpox (formerly known as monkeypox), primarily vaccines, have been in limited supply in many countries during outbreaks. Equitable allocation of scarce resources during public health emergencies is a complex challenge. Identifying the objectives and core values for the allocation of mpox countermeasures, using those values to provide guidance for priority groups and prioritisation tiers, and optimising allocation implementation are important. The fundamental values for the allocation of mpox countermeasures are: preventing death and illness; reducing the association between death (...)
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  48.  23
    Filthy Lucre or Fitting Offer? Understanding Worries About Payments to Research Participants.Holly Fernandez Lynch, Ezekiel J. Emanuel & Emily A. Largent - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (9):1-4.
    Volume 19, Issue 9, September 2019, Page 1-4.
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  49. The Moral Duty to Buy Health Insurance.Tina Rulli, Ezekiel Emanuel & David Wendler - 2012 - Journal of the American Medical Association 308 (2):137-138.
    The 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act was designed to increase health insurance coverage in the United States. Its most controversial feature is the requirement that US residents purchase health insurance. Opponents of the mandate argue that requiring people to contribute to the collective good is inconsistent with respect for individual liberty. Rather than appeal to the collective good, this Viewpoint argues for a duty to buy health insurance based on the moral duty individuals have to reduce certain burdens (...)
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  50.  13
    Making Vaccines Available to Other Countries Before Offering Domestic Booster Vaccinations.G. Owen Schaefer, Rj Leland & Ezekiel Emanuel - 2021 - JAMA 326 (10):903–904.
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