Results for 'Facial feedback'

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  1.  1
    Facial Feedback Affects Valence Judgments of Dynamic and Static Emotional Expressions.Sylwia Hyniewska & Wataru Sato - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  2.  32
    Facilitating the Furrowed Brow: An Unobtrusive Test of the Facial Feedback Hypothesis Applied to Unpleasant Affect.Randy J. Larsen, Margaret Kasimatis & Kurt Frey - 1992 - Cognition and Emotion 6 (5):321-338.
  3.  2
    The Effect of Facial Feedback on the Evaluation of Statements Describing Everyday Situations and the Role of Awareness.Kaiser Jakob & C. L. Davey Graham - 2017 - Consciousness and Cognition 53:23-30.
  4.  2
    The Facial Feedback Hypothesis of Emotion.Robert Soussignan - 2009 - In David Sander & Klaus R. Scherer (eds.), The Oxford Companion to Emotion and the Affective Sciences. Oxford University Press.
  5.  5
    Peripheral Feedback Effects of Facial Expressions, Bodily Postures, and Vocal Expressions on Emotional Feelings.William Flack - 2006 - Cognition and Emotion 20 (2):177-195.
  6.  73
    Simulationist Models of Face-Based Emotion Recognition.Alvin I. Goldman & Chandra S. Sripada - 2005 - Cognition 94 (3):193-213.
    Recent studies of emotion mindreading reveal that for three emotions, fear, disgust, and anger, deficits in face-based recognition are paired with deficits in the production of the same emotion. What type of mindreading process would explain this pattern of paired deficits? The simulation approach and the theorizing approach are examined to determine their compatibility with the existing evidence. We conclude that the simulation approach offers the best explanation of the data. What computational steps might be used, however, in simulation-style emotion (...)
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  7. From Unconscious to Conscious Perception: Emotionally Expressive Faces and Visual Awareness.John D. Eastwood - manuscript
  8.  2
    The Cognitive‐Evolutionary Model of Surprise: A Review of the Evidence. [REVIEW]Reisenzein Rainer, Horstmann Gernot & Schützwohl Achim - forthcoming - Topics in Cognitive Science.
    Research on surprise relevant to the cognitive-evolutionary model of surprise proposed by Meyer, Reisenzein, and Schützwohl is reviewed. The majority of the assumptions of the model are found empirically supported. Surprise is evoked by unexpected events and its intensity is determined by the degree if schema-discrepancy, whereas the novelty and the valence of the eliciting events probably do not have an independent effect. Unexpected events cause an automatic interruption of ongoing mental processes that is followed by an attentional shift and (...)
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  9.  28
    The Simulation of Smiles (SIMS) Model: Embodied Simulation and the Meaning of Facial Expression.Paula M. Niedenthal, Martial Mermillod, Marcus Maringer & Ursula Hess - 2010 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (6):417.
    Recent application of theories of embodied or grounded cognition to the recognition and interpretation of facial expression of emotion has led to an explosion of research in psychology and the neurosciences. However, despite the accelerating number of reported findings, it remains unclear how the many component processes of emotion and their neural mechanisms actually support embodied simulation. Equally unclear is what triggers the use of embodied simulation versus perceptual or conceptual strategies in determining meaning. The present article integrates behavioral (...)
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  10.  33
    Merging Information in Speech Recognition: Feedback is Never Necessary.Dennis Norris, James M. McQueen & Anne Cutler - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (3):299-325.
    Top-down feedback does not benefit speech recognition; on the contrary, it can hinder it. No experimental data imply that feedback loops are required for speech recognition. Feedback is accordingly unnecessary and spoken word recognition is modular. To defend this thesis, we analyse lexical involvement in phonemic decision making. TRACE (McClelland & Elman 1986), a model with feedback from the lexicon to prelexical processes, is unable to account for all the available data on phonemic decision making. The (...)
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  11.  40
    Functional Consequences of Perceiving Facial Expressions of Emotion Without Awareness.John D. Eastwood & Daniel Smilek - 2005 - Consciousness and Cognition 14 (3):565-584.
    A substantial body of research has established that even when we are not consciously aware of the faces of others we are nevertheless sensitive to, and impacted by their facial expression. In this paper, we consider this body of research from a new perspective by examining the functions of unconscious perception revealed by these studies. A consideration of the literature from this perspective highlights that existing research methods are limited when it comes to revealing possible functions of unconscious perception. (...)
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  12.  86
    Impaired Facial Emotion Recognition in Patients with Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Associated with Hippocampal Sclerosis (MTLE-HS): Side and Age at Onset Matters.Ulf Hlobil, Chaturbhuj Rathore, Aley Alexander, Sankara Sarma & Kurupath Radhakrishnan - 2008 - Epilepsy Research 80 (2-3):150–157.
    To define the determinants of impaired facial emotion recognition (FER) in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy associated with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS), we examined 76 patients with unilateral MTLE-HS, 36 prior to antero-mesial temporal lobectomy (AMTL) and 40 after AMTL, and 28 healthy control subjects with a FER test consisting of 60 items (20 each for anger, fear, and happiness). Mean percentages of the accurate responses were calculated for different subgroups: right vs. left MTLE-HS, early (age at onset <6 (...)
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  13.  12
    Facial Expression of Pain: An Evolutionary Account.Amanda C. De C. Williams - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (4):439-455.
    This paper proposes that human expression of pain in the presence or absence of caregivers, and the detection of pain by observers, arises from evolved propensities. The function of pain is to demand attention and prioritise escape, recovery, and healing; where others can help achieve these goals, effective communication of pain is required. Evidence is reviewed of a distinct and specific facial expression of pain from infancy to old age, consistent across stimuli, and recognizable as pain by observers. Voluntary (...)
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  14.  15
    The Influence of Infant Facial Cues on Adoption Preferences.Anthony Volk & Vernon L. Quinsey - 2002 - Human Nature 13 (4):437-455.
    Trivers’s theory of parental investment suggests that adults should decide whether or not to invest in a given infant using a cost-benefit analysis. To make the best investment decision, adults should seek as much relevant information as possible. Infant facial cues may serve to provide information and evoke feelings of parental care in adults. Four specific infant facial cues were investigated: resemblance (as a proxy for kinship), health, happiness, and cuteness. It was predicted that these cues would influence (...)
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  15.  10
    Video Feedback in Philosophy.Andy Lamey - 2015 - Metaphilosophy 46 (4-5):691-702.
    Marginal comments on student essays are a near-universal method of providing feedback in philosophy. Widespread as the practice is, however, it has well-known drawbacks. Commenting on students' work in the form of a video has the potential to improve the feedback experience for both instructors and students. The advantages of video feedback can be seen by examining it from both the professor's and the student's perspective. In discussing the professor's perspective, this article shares observations based on the (...)
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  16.  9
    Facial Attractiveness, Symmetry, and Physical Fitness in Young Women.Johannes Hönekopp, Tobias Bartholomé & Gregor Jansen - 2004 - Human Nature 15 (2):147-167.
    This study explores the evolutionary-based hypothesis that facial attractiveness (a guiding force in mate selection) is a cue for physical fitness (presumably an important contributor to mate value in ancestral times). Since fluctuating asymmetry, a measure of developmental stability, is known to be a valid cue for fitness in several biological domains, we scrutinized facial asymmetry as a potential mediator between attractiveness and fitness. In our sample of young women, facial beauty indeed indicated physical fitness. The relationships (...)
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  17.  3
    Feedback Models of Two Classical Philosophical Positions and a Semantic Problem.Umberto Viaro - 2016 - Foundations of Science 21 (3):533-542.
    The notion of feedback has been exploited with considerable success in scientific and technological fields as well as in the sciences of man and society. Its use in philosophical, cultural and educational contexts, however, is still rather meagre, even if some notable attempts can be found in the literature. This paper shows that the feedback concept can help learn and understand some classical philosophical theories. In particular, attention focuses on Fichte’s doctrine of science, usually presented in obscure terms (...)
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  18.  7
    Email || Home Page || Publication List.William H. Calvin - unknown
    Plan-ahead becomes necessary for those movements which are over-and-done in less time than it takes for the feedback loop to operate. Natural selection for one of the ballistic movements (hammering, clubbing, and throwing) could evolve a plan-ahead serial buffer for hand-arm commands that would benefit the other ballistic movements as well. This same circuitry may also sequence other muscles (children learning handwriting often screw up their faces and tongues) and so novel oral-facial sequences may also benefit (as might (...)
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  19.  2
    ILike-Minded.Adam Frank & Elizabeth A. Wilson - 2012 - Critical Inquiry 38 (4):870-877.
    Ruth Leys raises a number of important questions about the conceptual and empirical underpinnings of the affect theories that have emerged in the critical humanities, sciences, and social sciences in the last decade. There are a variety of frameworks for thinking about what constitutes the affective realm , and there are different preferences for how such frameworks could be deployed. We would like to engage with just one part of that debate: the contributions of Silvan Tomkins's affect theory. We take (...)
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  20.  1
    Human Homogamy in Facial Characteristics.Saori Nojo, Satoshi Tamura & Yasuo Ihara - 2012 - Human Nature 23 (3):323-340.
    Human homogamy may be caused in part by individuals’ preference for phenotypic similarities. Two types of preference can result in homogamy: individuals may prefer someone who is similar to themselves (self-referent phenotype matching) or to their parents (a sexual-imprinting-like mechanism). In order to examine these possibilities, we compare faces of couples and their family members in two ways. First, “perceived” similarity between a pair of faces is quantified as similarity ratings given to the pair. Second, “physical” similarity between two groups (...)
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  21.  1
    An Implementation Framework for the Feedback of Individual Research Results and Incidental Findings in Research.Adrian Thorogood, Yann Joly, Bartha Maria Knoppers, Tommy Nilsson, Peter Metrakos, Anthoula Lazaris & Ayat Salman - 2014 - BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):88.
    This article outlines procedures for the feedback of individual research data to participants. This feedback framework was developed in the context of a personalized medicine research project in Canada. Researchers in this domain have an ethical obligation to return individual research results and/or material incidental findings that are clinically significant, valid and actionable to participants. Communication of individual research data must proceed in an ethical and efficient manner. Feedback involves three procedural steps: assessing the health relevance of (...)
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  22.  1
    Stabilizing and Directional Selection on Facial Paedomorphosis.Paul Wehr, Kevin MacDonald, Rhoda Lindner & Grace Yeung - 2001 - Human Nature 12 (4):383-402.
    Averageness is purportedly the result of stabilizing selection maintaining the population mean, whereas facial paedomorphosis is a product of directional selection driving the population mean towards an increasingly juvenile appearance. If selection is predominantly stabilizing, intermediate phenotypes reflect high genetic quality and mathematically average faces should be found attractive. If, on the other hand, directional selection is strong enough, extreme phenotypes reflect high genetic quality and juvenilized faces will be found attractive. To compare the effects of stabilizing and directional (...)
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  23. El feedback correctivo escrito indirecto en el aprendizaje de la forma comparativa de adjetivos en inglés.Belén Muñoz & Anita Ferreira - 2017 - Logos: Revista de Lingüística, Filosofía y Literatura 27 (1):73-89.
    El feedback correctivo escrito ha demostrado ser efectivo para el tratamiento de ciertas estructuras gramaticales ; sin embargo, persisten factores que dificultan realizar conclusiones categóricas al respecto. Algunos de estos corresponden al tipo de las formas que se benefician de un tratamiento como este, a los distintos contextos de aprendizaje investigados, a los diversos niveles de competencia lingüística de los participantes, entre otros. La presente investigación estudia dos estrategias de FCE indirecto; a saber, indirecto con indicación y localización e (...)
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  24.  7
    Sensory Feedback to the Cerebral Cortex During Voluntary Movement in Man.P. E. Roland - 1978 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (1):129.
  25. Unconscious Facial Reactions to Emotional Facial Expressions.U. Dimberg, M. Thunberg & K. Elmehed - 2000 - Psychological Science 11 (1):86-89.
  26. Feedback Connections and Conscious Vision.Jean Bullier - 2001 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 5 (9):369-370.
  27. Comment On: Unconscious Affective Processing and Empathy: An Investigation of Subliminal Priming on the Detection of Painful Facial Expressions [Pain 2009; 1–2: 71–75].Simon van Rysewyk - 2009 - PAIN 145:364-366.
  28.  11
    Processing of Visual Feedback in Rapid Movements.Steven W. Keele & Michael I. Posner - 1968 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 77 (1):155.
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  29.  4
    Motor-Sensory Feedback and Geometry of Visual Space: An Attempted Replication.John Gyr, Richmond Willey & Adele Henry - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (1):59-64.
  30. Brain Activations During Conscious Self-Monitoring of Speech Production with Delayed Auditory Feedback: An fMRI Study.Yasuki Hashimoto & Kuniyoshi L. Sakai - 2003 - Human Brain Mapping 20 (1):22-28.
  31.  31
    Blindsight: The Role of Feedforward and Feedback Corticocortical Connections.Victor A. F. Lamme - 2001 - Acta Psychologica 107 (1):209-228.
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  32. Rational Feedback.Grant Reaber - 2012 - Philosophical Quarterly 62 (249):797-819.
    Suppose you think that whether you believe some proposition A at some future time t might have a causal influence on whether A is true. For instance, maybe you think a woman can read your mind, and either (1) you think she will snap her fingers shortly after t if and only if you believe at t that she will, or (2) you think she will snap her fingers shortly after t if and only if you don't believe at t (...)
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  33.  4
    Effects of Feedback and Instructional Set on the Control of Cardiac-Rate Variability.Peter J. Lang, Alan Sroufe & James E. Hastings - 1967 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 75 (4):425.
  34.  32
    Disclosive Ethics and Information Technology: Disclosing Facial Recognition Systems. [REVIEW]Lucas D. Introna - 2005 - Ethics and Information Technology 7 (2):75-86.
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  35.  3
    Ear Asymmetry and Delayed Auditory Feedback: Effects of Task Requirements and Competitive Stimulation.John L. Bradshaw, Norman C. Nettleton & Gina Geffen - 1972 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 94 (3):269.
  36.  4
    Routine Outcome Monitoring and Feedback on Physical or Mental Health Status: Evidence and Theory.Ingrid Ve Carlier, Denise Meuldijk, Irene M. Van Vliet, Esther Van Fenema, Nic Ja van der Wee & Frans G. Zitman - 2012 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (1):104-110.
  37.  22
    The Description of Facial Expressions in Terms of Two Dimensions.Harold Schlosberg - 1952 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 44 (4):229.
  38.  47
    Conscious and Nonconscious Discrimination of Facial Expressions.Catherine M. Herba, Maike Heining, Andrew W. Young, Michael Browning, Philip J. Benson, Mary L. Phillips & Jeffrey A. Gray - 2007 - Visual Cognition 15 (1):36-47.
  39.  18
    Multidimensional Scaling of Facial Expressions.Robert P. Abelson & Vello Sermat - 1962 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 63 (6):546.
  40. Nonconscious Emotions: New Findings and Perspectives on Nonconscious Facial Expression Recognition and its Voice and Whole-Body Contexts.Beatrice de Gelder - 2005 - In Lisa Feldman Barrett, Paula M. Niedenthal & Piotr Winkielman (eds.), Emotion and Consciousness. Guilford Press. pp. 123-149.
  41.  7
    Delivering Feedback on Learning Organization Characteristics – Using a Learning Practice Inventory.Diane R. Kelly, Murray Lough, Rosemary Rushmer, Joyce E. Wilkinson, Gail Greig & Huw T. O. Davies - 2007 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 13 (5):734-740.
  42. Processing Emotional Facial Expressions: The Role of Anxiety and Awareness.Elaine Fox - 2002 - Cognitive, Affective and Behavioral Neuroscience 2 (1):52-63.
  43.  33
    Studies of Emotional Reactions. I. 'A Preliminary Study of Facial Expression.".C. Landis - 1924 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 7 (5):325.
  44.  6
    Evidence for Feedback Dependent Conscious Awareness of Action.Sukhvinder S. Obhi - 2007 - Brain Research 1161:88-94.
  45.  20
    Response Feedback and Motor Learning.Jack A. Adams, Ernest T. Goetz & Phillip H. Marshall - 1972 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 92 (3):391.
  46. Consciousness and Emotional Facial Expression Recognition: Subliminal/Supraliminal Stimulation Effect on N200 and P300 ERPs. [REVIEW]Michela Balconi & Claudio Lucchiari - 2007 - Journal of Psychophysiology 21 (2):100-108.
  47.  18
    Response Feedback and Verbal Retention.Jack A. Adams, John S. McIntyre & Howard I. Thorsheim - 1969 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 82 (2):290.
  48.  5
    A Scale for the Judgment of Facial Expressions.H. Scholsberg - 1941 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 29 (6):497.
  49.  16
    The Frois-Wittmann Pictures of Facial Expression.W. S. Hulin & D. Katz - 1935 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 18 (4):482.
  50.  7
    Response Feedback and Short-Term Motor Retention.Jack A. Adams, Philip H. Marshall & Ernest T. Goetz - 1972 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 92 (1):92.
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