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  1.  58
    Moral Enhancement: Do Means Matter Morally?Farah Focquaert & Maartje Schermer - 2015 - Neuroethics 8 (2):139-151.
    One of the reasons why moral enhancement may be controversial, is because the advantages of moral enhancement may fall upon society rather than on those who are enhanced. If directed at individuals with certain counter-moral traits it may have direct societal benefits by lowering immoral behavior and increasing public safety, but it is not directly clear if this also benefits the individual in question. In this paper, we will discuss what we consider to be moral enhancement, how different means may (...)
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  2.  30
    The Ethical Desirability of Moral Bioenhancement: A Review of Reasons. [REVIEW]Jona Specker, Farah Focquaert, Kasper Raus, Sigrid Sterckx & Maartje Schermer - 2014 - BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):67.
    The debate on the ethical aspects of moral bioenhancement focuses on the desirability of using biomedical as opposed to traditional means to achieve moral betterment. The aim of this paper is to systematically review the ethical reasons presented in the literature for and against moral bioenhancement.
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  3.  57
    On Defining Moral Enhancement: A Clarificatory Taxonomy.Kasper Raus, Farah Focquaert, Maartje Schermer, Jona Specker & Sigrid Sterckx - 2014 - Neuroethics 7 (3):263-273.
    Recently there has been some discussion concerning a particular type of enhancement, namely ‘ moral enhancement ’. However, there is no consensus on what precisely constitutes moral enhancement, and as a result the concept is used and defined in a wide variety of ways. In this article, we develop a clarificatory taxonomy of these definitions and we identify the criteria that are used to delineate the concept. We think that the current definitions can be distinguished from each other by the (...)
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  4.  14
    Benign Biological Interventions to Reduce Offending.Olivia Choy, Farah Focquaert & Adrian Raine - forthcoming - Neuroethics:1-13.
    A considerable body of evidence now documents, beyond reasonable doubt, biological and health risk factors for crime and violence. Nevertheless, intervention and prevention efforts with offenders have avoided biological interventions, in part due to past misuses of biological research and the challenges that biological predispositions to crime raise. This article reviews the empirical literature on two biological intervention approaches, omega-3 supplementation and transcranial direct current stimulation. Emerging research on these relatively benign interventions suggests that increased omega-3 intake through dietary intervention (...)
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  5.  56
    Coercion, Incarceration, and Chemical Castration: An Argument From Autonomy.Thomas Douglas, Pieter Bonte, Farah Focquaert, Katrien Devolder & Sigrid Sterckx - 2013 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (3):393-405.
    In several jurisdictions, sex offenders may be offered chemical castration as an alternative to further incarceration. In some, agreement to chemical castration may be made a formal condition of parole or release. In others, refusal to undergo chemical castration can increase the likelihood of further incarceration though no formal link is made between the two. Offering chemical castration as an alternative to further incarceration is often said to be partially coercive, thus rendering the offender’s consent invalid. The dominant response to (...)
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  6.  32
    Mandatory Neurotechnological Treatment: Ethical Issues.Farah Focquaert - 2014 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 35 (1):59-72.
    What if neurofeedback or other types of neurotechnological treatment, by itself or in combination with behavioral treatment, could achieve a successful “rewiring” of the psychopath’s brain? Imagine that such treatments exist and that they provide a better long-term risk-minimizing strategy compared to imprisonment. Would it be ethical to offer such treatments as a condition of probation, parole, or prison release? In this paper, I argue that it can be ethical to offer effective, non-invasive neurotechnological treatments to offenders as a condition (...)
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  7.  5
    Forensic Practitioners’ Views on Stimulating Moral Development and Moral Growth in Forensic Psychiatric Care.Jona Specker, Farah Focquaert, Sigrid Sterckx & Maartje H. N. Schermer - forthcoming - Neuroethics:1-13.
    In the context of debates on psychiatry issues pertaining to moral dimensions of psychiatric health care are frequently discussed. These debates invite reflection on the question whether forensic practitioners have a role in stimulating patients’ moral development and moral growth in the context of forensic psychiatric and psychological treatment and care. We conducted a qualitative study to examine to what extent forensic practitioners consider moral development and moral growth to be a part of their current professional practices and to what (...)
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  8. Direct Intervention in the Brain: Ethical Issues Concerning Personal Identity.Dirk Ridder & Farah Focquaert - 2009 - Journal of Ethics in Mental Health 4:1-7.
    Personal identity has been the focus of philosophical and ethical debate for centuries. During the last decades, dif erent techniques for intervening in the brain, and hence our mind, are being developed and rei ned. Neuromodulation techniques, such as direct stimulation of the brain via implanted electrodes , target the brain’s capacity for reorganization to exert their ef ects and might directly or indirectly inl uence our mental states. In this paper, we investigate whether the possibility of altering our personal (...)
     
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  9.  62
    Deep Brain Stimulation in Children: Parental Authority Versus Shared Decision-Making.Farah Focquaert - 2013 - Neuroethics 6 (3):447-455.
    This paper discusses the use of deep brain stimulation for the treatment of neurological and psychiatric disorders in children. At present, deep brain stimulation is used to treat movement disorders in children and a few cases of deep brain stimulation for psychiatric disorders in adolescents have been reported. Ethical guidelines on the use of deep brain stimulation in children are therefore urgently needed. This paper focuses on the decision-making process, and provides an ethical framework for (future) treatment decisions in pediatric (...)
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  10. Direct Intervention in the Brain: Ethical Issues Concerning Personal Identity.Farah Focquaert & Dirk De Ridder - 2009 - Journal of Ethics in Mental Health 4 (2):1-7.
     
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  11.  24
    Free Will, Responsibility, and the Punishment of Criminals.Farah Focquaert, Andrea Glenn & Adrian Raine - 2013 - In Thomas A. Nadelhoffer (ed.), The Future of Punishment. Oup Usa. pp. 247.
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  12.  4
    Neuromodulatie En Narratieve Identiteit.Farah Focquaert - 2018 - Algemeen Nederlands Tijdschrift voor Wijsbegeerte 110 (3):291-313.
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  13.  4
    Bioethics and the Brain.Farah Focquaert - 2009 - Philosophical Psychology 22 (3):397-401.
  14.  45
    An Evolutionary Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective on Human Self-Awareness and Theory of Mind.Farah Focquaert, Johan Braeckman & Steven M. Platek - 2008 - Philosophical Psychology 21 (1):47 – 68.
    The evolutionary claim that the function of self-awareness lies, at least in part, in the benefits of theory of mind (TOM) regained attention in light of current findings in cognitive neuroscience, including mirror neuron research. Although certain non-human primates most likely possess mirror self-recognition skills, we claim that they lack the introspective abilities that are crucial for human-like TOM. Primate research on TOM skills such as emotional recognition, seeing versus knowing and ignorance versus knowing are discussed. Based upon current findings (...)
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  15. Het nut van waanzin. Essays over darwinisme en psychiatrie.Farah Focquaert - 2009 - Algemeen Nederlands Tijdschrift voor Wijsbegeerte 101 (4):278-279.
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  16.  4
    Autism Spectrum Traits in Normal Individuals: A Preliminary VBM Analysis.Farah Focquaert & Sven Vanneste - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  17.  1
    Rethinking Vulnerability.Farah Focquaert - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 4 (1):44-45.
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  18.  3
    Mirroring the Mind: On Empathy and Autism.Farah Focquaert & Johan Braeckman - 2011 - In Pieter R. Adriaens & Andreas de Block (eds.), Maladapting Minds: Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Evolutionary Theory. Oxford University Press. pp. 241.
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  19. Direct Electrical Stimulation of the Developing Brain: Who Decides?Farah Focquaert - 2017 - In Kristien Hens, Daniela Cutas & Dorothee Horstkötter (eds.), Parental Responsibility in the Context of Neuroscience and Genetics. Springer.
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