Results for 'Farah Philip'

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  1.  75
    Towards Responsible Use of Cognitive-Enhancing Drugs by the Healthy.Henry Greely, Barbara Sahakian, John Harris, Ronald Kessler, Gazzaniga C., Campbell Michael, Farah Philip & J. Martha - 2008 - Nature 456:702-705.
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  2.  23
    Neuropsychological Inference with an Interactive Brain: A Critique of the “Locality” Assumption.Martha J. Farah - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (1):43-61.
    When cognitive neuropsychologists make inferences about the functional architecture of the normal mind from selective cognitive impairments they generally assume that the effects of brain damage are local, that is, that the nondamaged components of the architecture continue to function as they did before the damage. This assumption follows from the view that the components of the functional architecture are modular, in the sense of being informationally encapsulated. In this target article it is argued that this “locality” assumption is probably (...)
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  3.  74
    Is Visual Imagery Really Visual: Some Overlooked Evidence From Neuropsychology.Martha J. Farah - 1988 - Psychological Review 95 (3):307-17.
  4. Visual Agnosia: Disorders of Object Recognition and What They Tell Us About Normal Vision.Martha J. Farah - 1990 - MIT Press.
  5.  96
    Moral Enhancement: Do Means Matter Morally?Farah Focquaert & Maartje Schermer - 2015 - Neuroethics 8 (2):139-151.
    One of the reasons why moral enhancement may be controversial, is because the advantages of moral enhancement may fall upon society rather than on those who are enhanced. If directed at individuals with certain counter-moral traits it may have direct societal benefits by lowering immoral behavior and increasing public safety, but it is not directly clear if this also benefits the individual in question. In this paper, we will discuss what we consider to be moral enhancement, how different means may (...)
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  6.  15
    Dissociated Overt and Covert Recognition as an Emergent Property of a Lesioned Neural Network.Martha J. Farah, Randall C. O'Reilly & Shaun P. Vecera - 1993 - Psychological Review 100 (4):571-588.
  7.  15
    The Neoliberal Yogi and the Politics of Yoga.Farah Godrej - 2017 - Political Theory 45 (6):772-800.
    Can the theory and practice of the yogic tradition serve as a challenge to dominant cultural and political norms in the Western world? In this essay I demonstrate that modern yoga is a creature of fabrication, while arguing that yogic norms can simultaneously reinforce and challenge the norms of contemporary Western neoliberal societies. In its current and most common iteration in the West, yoga practice does stand in danger of reinforcing neoliberal constructions of selfhood. However, yoga does contain ample resources (...)
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  8. Philip Kitcher.Philip Kitcher - unknown
    Philosophy is often conceived in the Anglophone world today as a subject that focuses on questions in particular ‘‘core areas,’’ pre-eminently epistemology and metaphysics. This article argues that the contemporary conception is a new version of the scholastic ‘‘self-indulgence for the few’’ of which Dewey complained nearly a century ago. Philosophical questions evolve, and a first task for philosophers is to address issues that arise for their own times. The article suggests that a renewal of philosophy today should turn the (...)
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  9.  14
    A Computational Model of Semantic Memory Impairment: Modality Specificity and Emergent Category Specificity.Martha J. Farah & James L. McClelland - 1991 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 120 (4):339-357.
  10. Personhood and Neuroscience: Naturalizing or Nihilating?Martha J. Farah & Andrea S. Heberlein - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (1):37-48.
    Personhood is a foundational concept in ethics, yet defining criteria have been elusive. In this article we summarize attempts to define personhood in psychological and neurological terms and conclude that none manage to be both specific and non-arbitrary. We propose that this is because the concept does not correspond to any real category of objects in the world. Rather, it is the product of an evolved brain system that develops innately and projects itself automatically and irrepressibly onto the world whenever (...)
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  11.  99
    Neuroethics: The Practical and the Philosophical.Martha J. Farah - 2005 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (1):34-40.
  12.  18
    What is "Special" About Face Perception?Martha J. Farah, Kevin D. Wilson, Maxwell Drain & James N. Tanaka - 1998 - Psychological Review 105 (3):482-498.
  13. ťIntroductionŤ, U: Philip Pettit & John McDowell (Ur.).Philip Pettit - 1986 - In John McDowell & Philip Pettit (eds.), Subject, Thought, and Context. Clarendon Press.
     
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  14.  33
    The Neurological Basis of Mental Imagery: A Componential Analysis.Martha J. Farah - 1984 - Cognition 18 (1-3):245-272.
  15.  13
    Monitoring and Manipulating Brain Function: New Neuroscience Technologies and Their Ethical Implications.Martha J. Farah & Paul Root Wolpe - 2004 - Hastings Center Report 34 (3):35-45.
  16.  15
    Psychophysical Evidence for a Shared Representational Medium for Mental Images and Percepts.Martha J. Farah - 1985 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 114 (1):91-103.
  17. Neuroethics and the Problem of Other Minds: Implications of Neuroscience for the Moral Status of Brain-Damaged Patients and Nonhuman Animals. [REVIEW]Martha J. Farah - 2008 - Neuroethics 1 (1):9-18.
    Our ethical obligations to another being depend at least in part on that being’s capacity for a mental life. Our usual approach to inferring the mental state of another is to reason by analogy: If another being behaves as I do in a circumstance that engenders a certain mental state in me, I conclude that it has engendered the same mental state in him or her. Unfortunately, as philosophers have long noted, this analogy is fallible because behavior and mental states (...)
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  18.  54
    The Economic Consequences of Philip Kitcher.Philip Mirowski - 1996 - Social Epistemology 10 (2):153 – 169.
  19.  45
    Mandatory Neurotechnological Treatment: Ethical Issues.Farah Focquaert - 2014 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 35 (1):59-72.
    What if neurofeedback or other types of neurotechnological treatment, by itself or in combination with behavioral treatment, could achieve a successful “rewiring” of the psychopath’s brain? Imagine that such treatments exist and that they provide a better long-term risk-minimizing strategy compared to imprisonment. Would it be ethical to offer such treatments as a condition of probation, parole, or prison release? In this paper, I argue that it can be ethical to offer effective, non-invasive neurotechnological treatments to offenders as a condition (...)
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  20.  75
    Neuroscience and Neuroethics in the 21st Century.M. J. Farah - 2011 - In Judy Illes & Barbara J. Sahakian (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Neuroethics. Oxford University Press. pp. 761--781.
    Neuroethics has developed rapidly, driven in large part by developments in neuroscience. This article reviews neuroethics from the standpoint of its growing real-world relevance. It opens up with an analysis of the history of neuroscience that suggests the reason for the emergence of neuroethics now, in the early twenty-first century. It proceeds to survey current applications of neuroscience to diverse real-world problems. Published research in the field of neuromarketing is more focused on academic issues, such as the nature of the (...)
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  21. A Model of Naming in Alzheimers-Disease-Unitary or Multiple Impairments.Lj Tippett & Mj Farah - 1992 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 30 (6):444-444.
  22.  55
    The Cognitive Neuroscience of Vision.Martha J. Farah - 2000 - Blackwell.
    The Cognitive Neuroscience of Vision begins by introducing the reader to the anatomy of the eye and visual cortex and then proceeds to discuss image and...
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  23.  24
    Visual Perception and Visual Awareness After Brain Damage: A Tutorial Overview.Martha J. Farah - 1994 - In Carlo Umilta & Morris Moscovitch (eds.), Consciousness and Unconscious Information Processing: Attention and Performance 15. MIT Press. pp. 203--236.
  24.  31
    Justice Without Retribution: Interdisciplinary Perspectives, Stakeholder Views and Practical Implications.Farah Focquaert, Gregg Caruso, Elizabeth Shaw & Derk Pereboom - 2020 - Neuroethics 13 (1):1-3.
    Within the United States, the most prominent justification for criminal punishment is retributivism. This retributivist justification for punishment maintains that punishment of a wrongdoer is justified for the reason that she deserves something bad to happen to her just because she has knowingly done wrong—this could include pain, deprivation, or death. For the retributivist, it is the basic desert attached to the criminal’s immoral action alone that provides the justification for punishment. This means that the retributivist position is not reducible (...)
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  25.  8
    Omitting Types in Logic of Metric Structures.Ilijas Farah & Menachem Magidor - 2018 - Journal of Mathematical Logic 18 (2):1850006.
    This paper is about omitting types in logic of metric structures introduced by Ben Yaacov, Berenstein, Henson and Usvyatsov. While a complete type is omissible in some model of a countable complete...
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  26.  48
    A Plea for Risk: Philip A. Ebert & Simon Robertson.Philip A. Ebert & Simon Robertson - 2013 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 73:45-64.
    Mountaineering is a dangerous activity. For many mountaineers, part of its very attraction is the risk, the thrill of danger. Yet mountaineers are often regarded as reckless or even irresponsible for risking their lives. In this paper, we offer a defence of risk-taking in mountaineering. Our discussion is organised around the fact that mountaineers and non-mountaineers often disagree about how risky mountaineering really is. We hope to cast some light on the nature of this disagreement – and to argue that (...)
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  27.  45
    The Moral Basis of Vegetarianism: Philip E. Devine.Philip E. Devine - 1978 - Philosophy 53 (206):481-505.
    If someone abstains from meat-eating for reasons of taste or personal economics, no moral or philosophical question arises. But when a vegetarian attempts to persuade others that they, too, should adopt his diet, then what he says requires philosophical attention. While a vegetarian might argue in any number of ways, this essay will be concerned only with the argument for a vegetarian diet resting on a moral objection to the rearing and killing of animals for the human table. The vegetarian, (...)
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  28.  7
    Does Visual Attention Select Objects or Locations?Shaun P. Vecera & Martha J. Farah - 1994 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 123 (2):146-160.
  29.  15
    Brain Images, Babies, and Bathwater:Critiquing Critiques of Functional Neuroimaging.Martha J. Farah - 2014 - Hastings Center Report 44 (s2):S19-S30.
  30.  45
    An Exploration of Naquib Al-Attas’ Theory of Islamic Education as Ta’Dīb as an ‘Indigenous’ Educational Philosophy.Farah Ahmed - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (8):786-794.
    This paper explores the ‘indigenous’ philosophy of education of Syed Muhammad Naquib al-Attas, a Malay-Muslim scholar who’s theoretical work culminated in the establishment of a counter-colonial higher education institution. Through presenting al-Attas’ life and philosophy and by exploring the arguments of his critics, I aim to shed light on the challenges and paradoxes faced by indigenous academics working at the interface of philosophy and education.
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  31.  13
    Unconscious Perception of "Extinguished" Visual Stimuli: Reassessing the Evidence.Martha J. Farah, M. A. Monheit & M. A. Wallace - 1991 - Neuropsychologia 29:949-58.
  32. Direct Intervention in the Brain: Ethical Issues Concerning Personal Identity.Farah Focquaert & Dirk De Ridder - 2009 - Journal of Ethics in Mental Health 4 (2):1-7.
     
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  33.  27
    Iterative Learning Control for MIMO Nonlinear Systems with Arbitrary Relative Degree and No States Measurement.Farah Bouakrif - 2014 - Complexity 19 (1):37-45.
  34.  49
    Shall I Compare Thee to a Minkowski-Ricardo-Leontief-Metzler Matrix of the Mosak-Hicks Type?: Or, Rhetoric, Mathematics, and the Nature of Neoclassical Economic Theory: Philip Mirowski.Philip Mirowski - 1987 - Economics and Philosophy 3 (1):67-95.
    Is rhetoric just a new and trendy way to épater les bourgeois? Unfortunately, I think that the newfound interest of some economists in rhetoric, and particularly Donald McCloskey in his new book and subsequent responses to critics, gives that impression. After economists have worked so hard for the past five decades to learn their sums, differential calculus, real analysis, and topology, it is a fair bet that one could easily hector them about their woeful ignorance of the conjugation of Latin (...)
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  35. An Augmented Buck-Passing Account of Reasons and Value: Scanlon and Crisp on What Stops the Buck: Philip Cook.Philip Cook - 2008 - Utilitas 20 (4):490-507.
    Roger Crisp has inspired two important criticisms of Scanlon's buck-passing account of value. I defend buck-passing from the wrong kind of reasons criticism, and the reasons and the good objection. I support Rabinowicz and Rønnow-Rasmussen's dual role of reasons in refuting the wrong kind of reasons criticism, even where its authors claim it fails. Crisp's reasons and the good objection contends that the property of goodness is buck-passing in virtue of its formality. I argue that Crisp conflates general and formal (...)
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  36.  35
    Free Will, Responsibility, and the Punishment of Criminals.Farah Focquaert, Andrea Glenn & Adrian Raine - 2013 - In Thomas A. Nadelhoffer (ed.), The Future of Punishment. Oup Usa. pp. 247.
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  37.  7
    Electrophysiological Evidence for a Shared Representational Medium for Visual Images and Visual Percepts.Martha J. Farah, Franck Péronnet, Marie A. Gonon & Marie H. Giard - 1988 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 117 (3):248-257.
  38.  67
    An Evolutionary Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective on Human Self-Awareness and Theory of Mind.Farah Focquaert, Johan Braeckman & Steven M. Platek - 2008 - Philosophical Psychology 21 (1):47 – 68.
    The evolutionary claim that the function of self-awareness lies, at least in part, in the benefits of theory of mind (TOM) regained attention in light of current findings in cognitive neuroscience, including mirror neuron research. Although certain non-human primates most likely possess mirror self-recognition skills, we claim that they lack the introspective abilities that are crucial for human-like TOM. Primate research on TOM skills such as emotional recognition, seeing versus knowing and ignorance versus knowing are discussed. Based upon current findings (...)
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  39.  78
    Socioeconomic Status and the Developing Brain.Daniel A. Hackman & Martha J. Farah - 2009 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 13 (2):65.
  40. Dictionary of the History of Ideas Studies of Selected Pivotal Ideas. Philip P. Wiener, Editor in Chief.Philip P. Wiener - 1973
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  41. The Advancement of Science: Science Without Legend, Objectivity Without Illusions.Philip Kitcher - 1993 - Oxford University Press.
    During the last three decades, reflections on the growth of scientific knowledge have inspired historians, sociologists, and some philosophers to contend that scientific objectivity is a myth. In this book, Kitcher attempts to resurrect the notions of objectivity and progress in science by identifying both the limitations of idealized treatments of growth of knowledge and the overreactions to philosophical idealizations. Recognizing that science is done not by logically omniscient subjects working in isolation, but by people with a variety of personal (...)
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  42.  80
    Deep Brain Stimulation in Children: Parental Authority Versus Shared Decision-Making.Farah Focquaert - 2013 - Neuroethics 6 (3):447-455.
    This paper discusses the use of deep brain stimulation for the treatment of neurological and psychiatric disorders in children. At present, deep brain stimulation is used to treat movement disorders in children and a few cases of deep brain stimulation for psychiatric disorders in adolescents have been reported. Ethical guidelines on the use of deep brain stimulation in children are therefore urgently needed. This paper focuses on the decision-making process, and provides an ethical framework for (future) treatment decisions in pediatric (...)
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  43.  78
    On Defining Moral Enhancement: A Clarificatory Taxonomy.Kasper Raus, Farah Focquaert, Maartje Schermer, Jona Specker & Sigrid Sterckx - 2014 - Neuroethics 7 (3):263-273.
    Recently there has been some discussion concerning a particular type of enhancement, namely ‘ moral enhancement ’. However, there is no consensus on what precisely constitutes moral enhancement, and as a result the concept is used and defined in a wide variety of ways. In this article, we develop a clarificatory taxonomy of these definitions and we identify the criteria that are used to delineate the concept. We think that the current definitions can be distinguished from each other by the (...)
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  44.  43
    The Ethical Desirability of Moral Bioenhancement: A Review of Reasons. [REVIEW]Jona Specker, Farah Focquaert, Kasper Raus, Sigrid Sterckx & Maartje Schermer - 2014 - BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):67.
    The debate on the ethical aspects of moral bioenhancement focuses on the desirability of using biomedical as opposed to traditional means to achieve moral betterment. The aim of this paper is to systematically review the ethical reasons presented in the literature for and against moral bioenhancement.
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  45.  13
    Mental Rotation and Orientation-Invariant Object Recognition: Dissociable Processes.Martha J. Farah & Katherine M. Hammond - 1988 - Cognition 29 (1):29-46.
  46.  17
    Ascetics, Warriors, and a Gandhian Ecological Citizenship.Farah Godrej - 2012 - Political Theory 40 (4):437-465.
    I argue here that a clearer conception of Gandhi's nonviolence is required in order to understand his resonance for contemporary environmentalism. Gandhi's nonviolence incorporates elements of both the brahmin or ascetic, as well as the ksatriya or warrior. Contemporary environmental movements by and large over-emphasize the self-abnegating, self-denying and self-scrutinizing ascetic components of Gandhi's thought, to the neglect of the confrontational and warrior-like ones. In so doing, they often also over-emphasize the ethical dimension of Gandhi's thought, missing the discursive political (...)
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  47.  32
    That Little Matter of Consciousness.Martha Farah - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (9):17 – 19.
  48.  74
    Imaging Visual Recognition: PET and fMRI Studies of the Functional Anatomy of Human Visual Recognition.M. Farah - 1999 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 3 (5):179-186.
  49.  3
    Biotechnology and the Transformation of Vaccine Innovation: The Case of the Hepatitis B Vaccines 1968–2000.Farah Huzair & Steve Sturdy - 2017 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 64:11-21.
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  50.  13
    Homicide Revisited: Philip E. Devine.Philip E. Devine - 1980 - Philosophy 55 (213):329-347.
    Jonathan Glover and I, while not in such deep disagreement about the ethics of killing as to make all communication impossible, still disagree enough to make sustained confrontation worthwhile. At minimum, such confrontation should make it clear what are the most fundamental issues at stake in ethical arguments about various kinds of killing.
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