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  1.  26
    Perception of politeness and the underlying cultural conceptualisations.Farzad Sharifian & Tahmineh Tayebi - 2017 - Latest Issue of Pragmatics and Society 8 (2):231-253.
    The present study sets out to investigate the role of ‘culture’ as one of the many important factors that influence the evaluation of politeness in Persian from a Cultural Linguistics perspective. The paper argues that Cultural Linguistics, and in particular the notion of cultural schema, has the potential to offer a robust analytical framework for the exploration of polite use of language. We elaborate on this proposal by presenting examples of data from Persian in which speakers interpret impolite behaviour in (...)
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  2.  24
    The Persian cultural schema of "shekasteh-nafsi": a study of compliment responses in Persian and Anglo-Australian speakers.Farzad Sharifian - 2005 - Pragmatics and Cognition 13 (2):337-362.
    This study is as an attempt to explicate the Persian cultural schema of shekasteh-nafsi ¿modesty¿. The schema motivates the speakers to downplay their talents, skills, achievements, etc. while praising a similar trait in their interlocutors. The schema also encourages the speakers to reassign the compliment to the giver of the compliment, a family member, a friend, or another associate. This paper explicates the schema in an ethnographic fashion and also makes use of empirical data to further explore how the schema (...)
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  3.  10
    The Persian cultural schema of shekasteh-nafsi: A study of compliment responses in Persian and Anglo-Australian speakers.Farzad Sharifian - 2005 - Pragmatics and Cognition 13 (2):337-361.
    This study is as an attempt to explicate the Persian cultural schema of shekasteh-nafsi `modesty'. The schema motivates the speakers to downplay their talents, skills, achievements, etc. while praising a similar trait in their interlocutors. The schema also encourages the speakers to reassign the compliment to the giver of the compliment, a family member, a friend, or another associate. This paper explicates the schema in an ethnographic fashion and also makes use of empirical data to further explore how the schema (...)
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  4.  5
    Aspects of Aboriginal English oral discourse: an application of cultural schema theory.Farzad Sharifian & Ian G. Malcolm - 2002 - Discourse Studies 4 (2):169-181.
    This article examines how cultural schema theory has been employed to explore some aspects of Aboriginal English oral discourse. The merit of this approach lies in the explanatory tools provided by cultural schema theory in accounting for those features of oral discourse in Aboriginal English which are distinctive and which often impair its lucidity to non-Aboriginal speakers. In particular, we have focused on the exploration of recurrent semantic and formal patterning across a large body of narratives, evidence of speakers' use (...)
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  5. Policy statement and retraction v.Teresa Bejarano-Fernández, Mary Besemeres, Anna Wierzbicka, Christoph Mischo, Steve Nicolle, Pablo Gamallo Otero, Dorit Ravid, Shoshana Zilberbuch, Wolff-Michael Roth & Farzad Sharifian - 2003 - Pragmatics and Cognition 11 (2):405-406.
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  6.  20
    The pragmatic marker like in English teen talk.Farzad Sharifian & Ian G. Malcolm - 2003 - Pragmatics and Cognition 11 (2):327-344.
    This study reports on the use of like in Aboriginal English teen talk. The analysis of a sub-corpus of 40 adolescent texts from a corpus of 100 narratives by speakers of Aboriginal English in Western Australia revealed that like is often employed by these speakers, and that it achieves a multitude of functions. In general it is observed that like may mark off a) a discrepancy between the intended conceptualization and the expressed concept, b) an attitude, feeling, or certain degree (...)
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  7.  36
    The pragmatic marker like in English teen talk: Australian Aboriginal usage.Farzad Sharifian & Ian G. Malcolm - 2003 - Pragmatics and Cognition 11 (2):327-344.
    This study reports on the use of like in Aboriginal English teen talk. The analysis of a sub-corpus of 40 adolescent texts from a corpus of 100 narratives by speakers of Aboriginal English in Western Australia revealed that like is often employed by these speakers, and that it performs a variety of functions. In general it is observed that like may mark off a) a discrepancy between the intended conceptualization and the expressed concept, b) an attitude, feeling, or a certain (...)
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