Results for 'Fascism History'

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  1.  61
    The Nationalist International: Or What American History Can Teach Us About the Fascist Revolution.J. L. Yannielli - 2012 - European Journal of Political Theory 11 (4):438-458.
    In challenging Marxist theorists to confront the radical rebirth at the core of the fascist revolution, Roger Griffin has carried fascist studies to a new and valuable plateau. Likewise, David D. Roberts’s elaboration of Griffin’s model offers a provocative and fruitful avenue to rethink fascist political culture. This article seeks to advance the dialogue to the next level by considering what an international approach can add to these primarily nationalist interpretations of generic fascism. Drawing on examples from the (...) of the United States, I argue that fascism is a fundamentally cosmopolitan process and that it needs to be placed on a broader continuum with the histories of slavery, racism and nationalism. (shrink)
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  2.  3
    Salaried Employees Between Fascism and Democracy. The Political and Social History of Salaried Employees, USA 1890–1940, with International Comparisons. [REVIEW]Bernd Warlich - 1979 - Philosophy and History 12 (1):94-96.
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  3.  17
    Fascism – Revolutionary Departure to an Alternative Modernity? A Response to Roger Griffin's 'Exploding the Continuum of History'.R. Saage - 2012 - European Journal of Political Theory 11 (4):426-437.
    If one looks at the controversial premises of analytical approaches to fascism according to Roger Griffin, it is not surprising that a yawning distance has opened up between Marxist and non-Marxist schools of interpretation. In this situation whereby two camps are mutually ignorant of one another, it is certainly suggestive that the liberal British theoretician of fascism should put himself forward to play the role of a ‘mediator’, even if he faces the danger of significant criticism from both (...)
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  4. Daniel Gasman, Haeckel's Monism and the Birth of Fascist Ideology. Studies in Modern European History, 33. New York: Peter Lang, 1998. Pp. VII+482. Isbn 0-8204-4108-2. $69·95. [REVIEW]Paul Weindling - 2002 - British Journal for the History of Science 35 (1).
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  5.  23
    Time, History, and Fascism in Bertolucci's Films.Frances Flanagan - 2008 - The European Legacy 4 (1):89-98.
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  6.  12
    Fascism After the End of History: An Introduction.R. J. B. Bosworth - 1999 - The European Legacy 4 (1):1-7.
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  7.  5
    Causal Nexus? Toward a Real History of Anti-Fascism and Anti-Bolshevism.Gerd Koenen - 1999 - Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 1999 (114):49-66.
    The question of whether there was a “causal nexus” between Bolshevism in the Soviet Union and National Socialism in Germany is far older than the Historikerstreit. Ernst Nolte's controversial thesis implied that the formation of the Nazis as a party (NSDAP) and a movement, and their subsequent rise to power were hardly conceivable without the German bourgeoisie's basic fear of Bolshevism; the Nazis' exterminatory anti-Semitism was only a sort of response to, and the interpretive reversal of, the looming expectation of (...)
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  8.  5
    Exorcisme Voor Gevorderden: Vladimir Tismaneanu, The Devil in History: Communism, Fascism, and Some Lessons of the Twentieth Century.Michel De Dobbeleer - forthcoming - Nexus: Leestafel.
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  9. A History of Fascism 1914-1945. By Stanley G. Payne.R. Bosworth - 2000 - The European Legacy 5 (3):443-443.
     
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  10. From Luther to Hitler the History of Fascist-Nazi Political Philosophy.William Montgomery Mcgovern & Edward Mcchesney Sait - 1941 - George G. Harrap & Co..
     
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  11. The Progressive Revolution: History of Liberal Fascism Through the Ages, Vol. Iii: 2010–11 Writings.Ellis Washington - 2015 - Upa.
    The Progressive Revolution Volume III continues the historical and literary series systematically chronicling both the historical significance and political deconstruction that the Progressive Revolution or the Progressive Age has perpetrated against Western Civilization and American society even to this day.
     
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  12. The Progressive Revolution: History of Liberal Fascism Through the Ages, Vol. Iv: 2012–13 Writings.Ellis Washington - 2015 - Upa.
    The Progressive Revolution Volume IV continues this historical and literary series by systematically chronicling both the historical significance and political deconstruction that the Progressive Revolution or the Progressive Age has perpetrated against Western Civilization and American society.
     
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  13. The Progressive Revolution: History of Liberal Fascism Through the Ages, Vol. V: 2014-2015 Writings.Ellis Washington - 2016 - Hamilton Books.
    The Progressive Revolution —continues his legal, historical and literary series based on Natural Law, Natural Rights and the original political philosophy of the constitutional Framers and original jurisprudence of the U.S. Supreme Court.
     
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  14.  14
    Avant-Garde Fascism: The Mobilization of Myth, Art, and Culture in France, 1909-1939.Mark Antliff - 2007 - Duke University Press.
    Fascism, modernism and modernity -- The Jew as anti-artist : Georges Sorel and the aesthetics of the anti- Enlightenment -- La Cité française : Georges Valois, Le Corbusier and fascist theories of urbanism -- Machine primitives : Philippe Lamour and the fascist cult of youth -- Classical violence : Thierry Maulnier and the legacy of the Cercle Proudhon.
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  15. The Philosophic Roots of Modern Ideology: Liberalism, Conservatism, Marxism, Fascism, Nazism, Islamism.David E. Ingersoll - 2009 - Sloan.
  16.  2
    Italian Legacies1.Rik Peters - 2010 - History and Theory 49 (1):115-129.
    This paper discusses David Roberts's latest book in which he seeks to throw some light on urgent postmodern historiographical issues from the angle of Italian historicism, led by Benedetto Croce and Giovanni Gentile . Focusing on the relationship between theory and practice, Roberts argues that there was a close relationship between Italian historicism and fascism. On the basis of the principle that “reality is nothing but history”, both Croce and Gentile sought to develop a philosophy that connects historical (...)
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  17.  24
    Technology, War, and Fascism.Herbert Marcuse - 1998 - Routledge.
    Acclaimed throughout the world as a philosopher of liberation and revolution, Herbert Marcuse is one of the most influential thinkers of the twentieth century. His penetrating critiques of the ways modern technology produces forms of society and culture with oppressive modes of social control indicate his enduring significance in the contemporary moment. This collection of unpublished or uncollected essays, unfinished manuscripts, and correspondence between 1942 and 1951, provides Marcuse's exemplary attempts to link theory with practice, and develops ideas that can (...)
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  18. A History of Western Thought: From Ancient Greece to the Twentieth Century.Nils Gilje & Gunnar Skirbekk - 2001 - Routledge.
    This is a comprehensive introduction to the history of Western Philosophy from the Pre-Socratics to Twentieth Century thought. In addition to all the key figures, the book covers figures whose contributions have so far been overlooked, such as Vico, Montesquieu, Durkheim and Weber. Along with in-depth discussion of the philosophical movements, Skirbekk and Gilje also discuss the natural sciences, the establishment of the Humanities, Socialism and Fascism, Psychoanalysis, and the rise of the social sciences. _History of Western Thought_ (...)
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  19.  9
    6. Actes de Présence: Presence in Fascist Political Culture.Rik Peters - 2006 - History and Theory 45 (3):362–374.
    In order to discuss the notion of presence, I explore Fascist Italy as an example of a presence-based culture. In the first part of this paper, I focus on the doctrines of "the philosopher of fascism," Giovanni Gentile , in order to show that his programme of cultural awakening revolves around the notion of the "presentification of the past." This notion formed the basis of Gentile's dialectic of the act of thought, which is the kernel of his actual idealism, (...)
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  20.  17
    Actualism and the Fascist Historic Imaginary.Claudio Fogu - 2003 - History and Theory 42 (2):196–221.
    This essay argues that, just like liberalism and communism, fascist ideology was based on a specific philosophy of history articulated by Giovanni Gentile in the aftermath of World War I. Gentile’s actualist notion that history “belongs to the present” articulated an immanent vision of the relationship between historical agency, representation, and consciousness against all transcendental conceptions of history. I define this vision as historic because it translated the popular notion of historic eventfulness into the idea of the (...)
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  21.  5
    National Identity in the Vanquished State: German and Japanese Postwar Historiography From a Transnational Perspective.Erik Grimmer‐Solem - 2012 - History and Theory 51 (2):280-291.
    The defeat of Germany and Japan in 1945 required historians in both countries to reevaluate the past to make sense of national catastrophe. Sebastian Conrad's The Quest for the Lost Nation analyzes this process comparatively in the context of allied military occupation and the Cold War to reveal how historians in both countries coped with a discredited national history and gradually salvaged a national identity. He pays special attention to the role of social, discursive, and transnational contexts that shaped (...)
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  22.  6
    Scientism and its Discontents: The Indo-Muslim “Fascism” of Inayatullah Khan Al-Mashriqi.Markus Daechsel - 2006 - Modern Intellectual History 3 (3):443-472.
    This essay offers a detailed reconstruction of the thought of Inayatullah Khan al-Mashriqi, a camp-follower of fascism in inter-war India who sought to reformulate Islam as a according to the precepts of Darwinian evolutionism. Mashriqi has so far been neglected because his political impact was only short-term and did not contribute to the larger story of decolonization in India and Pakistan. But far from being marginal, Mashriqi's philosophical ruminations actually provide a window for a much-needed re-evaluation of the meaning (...)
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  23.  3
    Explaining "Auschwitz" After the End of History: The Case of Italy.R. J. B. Bosworth - 1999 - History and Theory 38 (1):84–99.
    Everywhere the 1990s have been characterized by an odd mixture of ideological triumphalism-Fukuyama's "end of history" being only the crassest example-and of ideological uncertainty-can there be, should there be, a "third way"? For all its pretensions to universality, the "New World Order" has never lost a fragility in appearance. Students of historiography can scarcely be surprised to learn that an uneasiness over the present and future has in turn frequently entailed uncertainty about the past and particularly about those parts (...)
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  24. L'immagine Del Fascismo in Giovanni Gentile.Hervé A. Cavallera - 2008 - Pensa Multimedia.
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  25. Archetypes and Paradigms: History, Politics, and Persons.Adrian Kuzminski - 1986 - History and Theory 25 (3):225-247.
    The Left is scientific, rational, paradigmatic; its concern is with the networks of relationships within which all things are located and through which all things have their significance. The Right is aesthetic, emotional. It attempts to understand in terms of some concrete specific, an archetype. Hybrids of these two, such as Christianity, Communism, and Fascism, mix paradigm and archetype and are dangerous. With the reification of form and idolatry of image, inhuman criteria of reality are automatically set up and (...)
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  26. Fascism, Capitalism, Modernity.L. Pellicani - 2012 - European Journal of Political Theory 11 (4):394-409.
    In this article I respond to the important questions raised by Roger Griffin and David D. Roberts by asserting the following points. First, that there is no justification to the position that the historical function of fascism was to establish the political hegemony of finance capital, as Marxist-Leninist scholars have maintained without providing a shred of evidence in support of their position. On the contrary, fascism was an epochal phenomenon which occured on several continents and had features which (...)
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  27. Mussolini's Intellectuals: Fascist Social and Political Thought.A. James Gregor - 2006 - Princeton University Press.
    Fascism has traditionally been characterized as irrational and anti-intellectual, finding expression exclusively as a cluster of myths, emotions, instincts, and hatreds. This intellectual history of Italian Fascism--the product of four decades of work by one of the leading experts on the subject in the English-speaking world--provides an alternative account. A. James Gregor argues that Italian Fascism may have been a flawed system of belief, but it was neither more nor less irrational than other revolutionary ideologies of (...)
     
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  28.  92
    American History X, Cinematic Manipulation, and Moral Conversion.Christopher Grau - 2010 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 34 (1):52-76.
    American History X (hereafter AHX) has been accused by numerous critics of a morally dangerous cinematic seduction: using stylish cinematography, editing, and sound, the film manipulates the viewer through glamorizing an immoral and hate-filled neo-nazi protagonist. In addition, there’s the disturbing fact that the film seems to accomplish this manipulation through methods commonly grouped under the category of “fascist aesthetics.” More specifically, AHX promotes its neo-nazi hero through the use of several filmic techniques made famous by Nazi propagandist Leni (...)
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  29.  44
    Re-Examining the 'End of History' Idea and World History Since Hegel.Peter Loptson - 2007 - The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 12:175-182.
    This paper offers an analysis of central features of modern world history which suggest a confirmation, and extension, of something resembling Fukuyama's Kojeve-Hegel *end of history' thesis. As is well known, Kojeve interpreted Hegel as having argued that in a meaningful sense history, as struggle and endeavour to achieve workable stasis in the mutual relations of selves and state-society collectivities, literally came to an end with Napoleon's 1806 victory at the battle of Jena. That victory led to (...)
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  30.  7
    Italians, the “Good People”: Reflections on National Self-Representation in Contemporary Italian Debates on Xenophobia and War.Paolo Favero - 2010 - Outlines. Critical Practice Studies 12 (2):138-153.
    Normal 0 0 1 91 520 .. 4 1 638 11.1280 0 14 0 0 Moving among historical material and contemporary debates on xenophobia and war, this paper is an exploration of the self-representation “ Italiani Brava Gente ”, an image claiming the intrinsic goodness of the Italian people. Originated during the first Italian colonial enterprises, it has been used also for overcoming the horrors of Fascism and is evoked in contemporary Italy too for justifying traumatic and violent events. (...)
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  31.  3
    The Actuality of Gentile's Philosophy of History.R. Peters - 2014 - Collingwood and British Idealism Studies 20 (1-2):167-203.
    This essay reconstructs Gentile's conception of history as the product of the eternal act of thinking. Peters charts the development of this distinctive position, presenting it as the product of a sustained attempt to unite past and present, fact and value, thought and action within a single theory. He argues that, despite a number of weaknesses that Gentile neglected to consider and the regrettable, dubious extremes to which he extended his theory in the Fascist period, it deserves greater attention (...)
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  32. The Cambridge History of Twentieth-Century Political Thought.Terence Ball & Richard Bellamy (eds.) - 2003 - Cambridge University Press.
    This major work of academic reference provides a comprehensive overview of the development of political thought from the late nineteenth to the end of the twentieth century. Written by a distinguished team of international contributors, this Cambridge History, first published in 2003, covers the rise of the welfare state and subsequent reactions to it, the fascist and communist critiques of and attempted alternatives to liberal democracy, the novel forms of political organisation occasioned by the rise of a mass electorate (...)
     
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  33. A History of Western Thought: From Ancient Greece to the Twentieth Century.Nils Gilje & Gunnar Skirbekk - 2013 - Routledge.
    This is a comprehensive introduction to the history of Western Philosophy from the Pre-Socratics to Twentieth Century thought. In addition to all the key figures, the book covers figures whose contributions have so far been overlooked, such as Vico, Montesquieu, Durkheim and Weber. Along with in-depth discussion of the philosophical movements, Skirbekk and Gilje also discuss the natural sciences, the establishment of the Humanities, Socialism and Fascism, Psychoanalysis, and the rise of the social sciences. _History of Western Thought_ (...)
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  34. History and Repetition.Seiji M. Lippit (ed.) - 2011 - Cambridge University Press.
    Kojin Karatani wrote the essays in _History and Repetition_ during a time of radical historical change, triggered by the collapse of the Cold War and the death of the Showa emperor in 1989. Reading Karl Marx in an original way, Karatani developed a theory of history based on the repetitive cycle of crises attending the expansion and transformation of capital. His work led to a rigorous analysis of political, economic, and literary forms of representation that recast historical events as (...)
     
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  35. History as Thought and Action: The Philosophies of Croce, Gentile, de Ruggiero and Collingwood.Peters Rik - 2013 - Imprint Academic.
    This is the first book-length study of the relationship between Benedetto Croce, Giovanni Gentile, Guido de Ruggiero and Robin George Collingwood. Though the relationship between these highly influential philosophers has often been discussed, it has never been studied comprehensively.On the basis of published and unpublished writings this study carefully reconstructs their debate on the relationship between thought and action, following their explorations of art, history, philosophy and action in the context of the First World War and the rise of (...)
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  36.  19
    Against the Modern World: Traditionalism and the Secret Intellectual History of the Twentieth Century.Mark J. Sedgwick - 2004 - Oxford University Press.
    Against the Modern World is the first history of Traditionalism, an important yet surprisingly little-known twentieth-century anti-modern movement. Comprising a number of often secret but sometimes very influential religious groups in the West and in the Islamic world, it affected mainstream and radical politics in Europe and the development of the field of religious studies in the United States, touching the lives of many individuals. French writer Rene Guenon rejected modernity as a dark age and sought to reconstruct the (...)
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  37.  10
    The 'Archangel Michael' Legion in Roumania. Social Movement and Political Organization. A Study on the Problem of International Fascism.Michael Salewski - 1989 - Philosophy and History 22 (2):185-186.
  38.  7
    Fascism in Austria. From Schönerer to Hitler.Milan Hauner - 1980 - Philosophy and History 13 (2):194-195.
  39.  9
    Fascism as a Social Movement. Germany and Italy Compared.Hans Ulrich Thamer - 1978 - Philosophy and History 11 (1):101-103.
  40.  3
    Between Fascism and Democracy. German National Philosophy in Austria, 1919–1930.Bernd Warlich - 1979 - Philosophy and History 12 (1):68-71.
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  41.  3
    The Nazis. Analyses of Fascist Movements.Konrad Fuchs - 1981 - Philosophy and History 14 (2):197-197.
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  42. Ernesto Grassi: Humanismus Zwischen Faschismus Und Nationalsozialismus.Wilhelm Büttemeyer - 2009 - Alber.
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  43.  15
    Italian Fascism and Utopia.Charles Burdett - 2003 - History of the Human Sciences 16 (1):93-108.
    Considering a number of recent works on the ideology and culture of Fascism, the article explores how the concept of utopia, as formulated by different thinkers, can prove useful in attempting to unlock some of the mechanisms through which Fascism sought to manipulate the imagination and the aspirations of Italians. It focuses on the written accounts of writers and journalists who reported on the supposed achievements of the regime both in Italy and in the newly established colonies. It (...)
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  44.  15
    “Diesem Film Liegen Tatsachen Zugrunde...” The Narrative of Antifascism and Its Appropriation in the East German Espionage Series Das Unsichtbare Visier.Sebastian Haller - 2014 - History of Communism in Europe 5:72-105.
    Since narratives of legitimation have to adapt to shifting discursive environments, they cannot be regarded as static phenomena. To present a sound understanding of their embedment in a specific context, narratives have to be approached from a variety of perspectives – they necessitate, in other words, a “thick description”. This paper addresses the narrative of antifascism as a central element of public discourse throughout the history of the German Democratic Republic and contextualizes it specifically in East German television culture. (...)
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  45.  14
    Gramsci's Interpretation of Fascism.Walter L. Adamson - 1980 - Journal of the History of Ideas 41 (4):615-633.
    Gramsci, An italian marxist intellectual politically active when fascism rose and later imprisoned by mussolini, Offers a sensitive and non-Stereotyped communist interpretation of fascism. He rejected the crude "fascism as last stage of capitalism thesis," the view that it was merely the "agent of the big bourgeoisie" and even the view that it reflected a particular set of class interests. He recognized that it was not merely reactionary, That it had complex internal divisions, That it exemplified the (...)
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  46.  5
    Nietzsche and Fascism.Howard Williams - 1989 - History of European Ideas 11 (1-6):893-899.
    There is an affinity between the politics that might be derived from Nietzsche's philosophy and the politics of fascism. Nietzsche favours elitism, he is not wholly averse to the use of cruelty as a means of achieving political ends, he is prepared to break decisively with the past and recommends an anti-Christian ethos. Those things in Nietzsche's philosophy which appear to denote the arbitrariness of civilisation might be picked on by a person of a fascist disposition. What they arguably (...)
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  47.  7
    Machiavelli and Italian Fascism.J. Femia - 2004 - History of Political Thought 25 (1):1-15.
    The paper challenges the fashionable interpretation of Machiavelli as an idealistic champion of liberty and self-governance, and tries to demonstrate -- through textual analysis -- that the ideology of Italian fascism is permeated by Machiavellian themes and principles. Although this convergence is generally ignored in the scholarly literature on fascism and was rarely acknowledged by Mussolini or Gentile themselves, it is evident in their hostility to metaphysical abstractions, their contempt for the idea of moral progress, their indifference to (...)
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  48.  12
    The Fascist State.Edward F. Murphy - 1933 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 9:63-80.
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  49.  8
    Piero Gobetti and the Rhetoric of Liberal Anti-Fascism.James Martin - 2007 - History of the Human Sciences 20 (4):107-127.
    This article examines the anti-fascist rhetoric of the self-proclaimed `revolutionary liberal', Piero Gobetti, in Italy in the early 1920s. Gobetti is interesting from a rhetorical perspective for two reasons: first, for his efforts to redefine liberalism as an emancipatory ethic of struggle that extended to the revolutionary worker's movement; and second, for his rejection of fascism as essentially continuous with the anti-conflictual tendencies of the liberal parliamentary regime. An exemplary `ideological innovator', Gobetti's `paradiastolic' redescription of liberalism and his metaphorical (...)
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  50.  5
    The Uses and Abuses of 'Secular Religion': Jules Monnerot's Path From Communism to Fascism.Dan Stone - 2011 - History of European Ideas 37 (4):466-474.
    From starting his intellectual career as a surrealist, communist and co-founder of the Collège de Sociologie in 1937, Jules Monnerot (1911?95) ended it as a candidate for the Front National in 1989.In this article I offer an explanation for the unexpected trajectory of this thinker whose work is little known in the English-speaking world. Without overlooking the idea that the infamous College encouraged such tendencies, I argue that the notion of ?secular religion?, as Monnerot developed it in his Sociology of (...)
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