Results for 'Fate and fatalism in literature'

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  1.  7
    Fate and Fortune in European Thought, ca. 1400–1650.Ovanes Akopyan (ed.) - 2021 - Boston: BRILL.
    This collection of essays presents new insights into what shaped and constituted the Renaissance and early modern views of fate and fortune. It argues that these ideas were emblematic of a more fundamental argument about the self, society, and the universe and shows that their influence was more widespread, both geographically and thematically, than hitherto assumed.
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  2.  11
    Moira: Fate, Good, and Evil in Greek Thought.William Chase Greene - 1944 - Harvard University Press.
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  3. On fate and fatalism.Robert C. Solomon - 2003 - Philosophy East and West 53 (4):435-454.
    : Fate and fatalism have been powerful notions in many societies, from Homer's Iliad, the Greek moira, the South Asian karma, and the Chinese ming in the ancient world to the modern concept of "destiny." But fate and fatalism are now treated with philosophical disdain or as a clearly inferior version of what is better considered as "determinism." The concepts of fate and fatalism are defended here, and fatalism is clearly distinguished from determinism. (...)
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  4.  98
    Foreknowledge, fate and freedom.Stephanie Rennick - unknown
    “Foreknowledge, Fate and Freedom” is concerned with diagnosing and debunking a pervasive and prevalent folk intuition: that a foreknown future would be problematically, and freedom-hinderingly, fixed. In it, I discuss foreknowledge in and of itself, but also as a lens through which we can examine other intuitions and concepts: the apparent asymmetry of future and past; worries about fate and free will; notions of coincidence and likelihood; assumptions about God, time travel and ourselves. This thesis provides the first (...)
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  5.  8
    The Victorians and the Visual Imagination.Kate Flint & Reader in Victorian and Modern English Literature and Fellow Kate Flint - 2000 - Cambridge University Press.
    Richly illustrated study drawing on art, literature and science to explore Victorian attitudes towards sight.
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  6.  2
    Fatalism, Fate, and Stratagem in China and Greece.Lisa Raphals - 2012 - In Steven Shankman & Stephen W. Durrant (eds.), Early China/Ancient Greece: Thinking through Comparisons. SUNY Press. pp. 207-234.
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  7.  27
    Determinism, Fatalism, and Free Will in Hawthorne.James S. Mullican - 1979 - Philosophy and Literature 3 (1):91-106.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:James S. Mullican DETERMINISM, FATALISM, AND FREE WILL IN HAWTHORNE A recurrent theme in Nathaniel Hawthorne's writing is the relationship between fatalism and free will. His tales, romances, and notebooks contain explicit and implied references to man's freedom of choice and his consequent responsibility for his acts, as well as to "fatalities" that impel men to various courses of action. Much of the ambiguity in Hawthorne's fiction (...)
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  8.  86
    Fate, Fatalism, and Agency in Stoicism.Susan Sauvé Meyer - 1999 - Social Philosophy and Policy 16 (2):250.
    A perennial subject of dispute in the Western philosophical tradition is whether human agents can be responsible for their actions even if determinism is true. By determinism, I mean the view that everything that happens is completely determined by antecedent causes. One of the least impressive objections that is leveled against determinism confuses determinism with a very different view that has come to be known as “fatalism”: this is the view that everything is determined to happen independently of human (...)
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  9. Book Review Fate and Fortune in the Indian Scriptures by Sukumari Bhattacharji. [REVIEW]Swami Narasimhananda - 2015 - Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 120 (3):293-4.
    The author could have shown the other perspective also where fate or fortune is proclaimed to be in the hands of a person. It is notable that almost all of the translations and works she cites are by authors from outside the Indian tradition, with a Semitic bearing on their thought. The author comes a bit too strongly and without sufficient background material, in brushing aside as inconsequential, years of thought and philosophising in the Indian tradition. However, no Eastern (...)
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  10.  2
    Die Idee des Schicksals in der Geschichte der Tragödie: Ein Kapitel Einer Ästhetik (Classic Reprint).Albert Görland - 2018 - Forgotten Books.
    Excerpt from Die Idee des Schicksals in der Geschichte der Tragdie: Ein Kapitel Einer sthetik Qbenn nun aber bie fiunitgefrbicbte aus iid) unb fur lid) ielbit icbon eine beorie ber Runft 5u fcbaffen begonnen bat, was will bann norb eine Qlftbetit neben unb auer ibr? (c)ibt es ein Qiecbt ber c13l)ilbfbpbie auf ein Guitem glieb, genannt Qlitbetii, b. B. bbiloiopbie ber Runftl'? About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This (...)
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  11.  50
    Fatalism in American film noir: some cinematic philosophy.Robert B. Pippin - 2012 - Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press.
    Introduction -- Trapped by oneself in Jacques Tourneur's Out of the past -- "A deliberate, intentional fool" in Orson Welles's The lady from Shanghai -- Sexual agency in Fritz Lang's Scarlet Street -- "Why didn't you shoot again, baby?": concluding remarks.
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  12.  80
    Hegel and Shakespeare on Moral Imagination.Jennifer Ann Bates - 2010 - State University of New York Press.
    A Hegelian reading of good and bad luck -- In Shakespearean drama (phen. of spirit, King Lear, Othello, Hamlet, a Midsummer night's dream) -- Tearing the fabric: Hegel's Antigone, Shakespeare's Coriolanus, and kinship-state conflict (phen. of spirit c. 6, Judith Butler's Antigone, Coriolanus) -- Aufhebung and anti-aufhebung: geist and ghosts in Hamlet (phen. of spirit, Hamlet) -- The problem of genius in King Lear: Hegel on the feeling soul and the tragedy of wonder (anthropology and psychology in the encyclopaedia, Philosophy (...)
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  13.  4
    I greci e il trascendente.Giuseppe Ferraro - 1995
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  14. Fischer's Fate With Fatalism.Christoph Jäger - 2017 - European Journal for the Philosophy of Religion 9 (4):25-38.
    John Martin Fischer’s core project in Our Fate (2016) is to develop and defend Pike-style arguments for theological incompatibilism, i. e., for the view that divine omniscience is incompatible with human free will. Against Ockhamist attacks on such arguments, Fischer maintains that divine forebeliefs constitute so-called hard facts about the times at which they occur, or at least facts with hard ‘kernel elements’. I reconstruct Fischer’s argument and outline its structural analogies with an argument for logical fatalism. I (...)
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  15.  13
    Fate and God, Gallows and Cross, Sword and Spear. The Variation of Counterconcepts as Part of the Poetic Diction in the Old Saxon Heliand.Heike Sahm - 2014 - In Heike Sahm & Victor Millet (eds.), Narration and Hero: Recounting the Deeds of Heroes in Literature and Art of the Early Medieval Period. De Gruyter. pp. 95-112.
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  16. Pleasure and pain in literature.Oliver Conolly - 2005 - Philosophy and Literature 29 (2):305-320.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Pleasure and Pain in LiteratureOliver ConollyWhy do we enjoy the depiction, in imaginative literature, of situations that typically arouse negative emotions such as pity, sadness, and horror? One view, which aims to dissolve rather than solve the problem, is that we do not enjoy them at all. According to this theory—the pure pain theory—the problem does not arise in the first place. But the theory must explain why (...)
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  17. The Bibliothèque raisonnée Review of Volume 3 of the Treatise: Authorship, Text, and Translation.David Fate Norton and Dario Perinetti - 2006 - Hume Studies 32 (1):3-52.
    Volumes 1 and 2 of Hume’s Treatise of Human Nature, first published in January 1739, were soon after publication the subject of five notices and four reviews. Volume 3, published at the end of October 1740, received no notices and was reviewed only in the Bibliothèque raisonnée. This anonymous review of vol. 3 is of interest not only for David Norton is Professor of Philosophy Emeritus, McGill University, and Adjunct Professor of Philosophy, University of Victoria. His address is 8-4305 Maltwood (...)
     
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  18.  37
    Fischer’s Fate with Fatalism.Christoph Jäger - 2017 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 9 (4):25-38.
    John Martin Fischer’s core project in Our Fate is to develop and defend Pike-style arguments for theological incompatibilism, i. e., for the view that divine omniscience is incompatible with human free will. Against Ockhamist attacks on such arguments, Fischer maintains that divine forebeliefs constitute so-called hard facts about the times at which they occur, or at least facts with hard ‘kernel elements’. I reconstruct Fischer’s argument and outline its structural analogies with an argument for logical fatalism. I then (...)
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  19.  14
    Sex and Gender in Medieval and Renaissance Texts: The Latin Tradition.Barbara K. Gold, Barbara H. Gold, Carolina Distinguished Professor of Classics and Comparative Literature Paul Allen Miller, Paul Allen Miller & Charles Platter - 1997 - SUNY Press.
    Examines interrelated topics in Medieval and Renaissance Latin literature: the status of women as writers, the status of women as rhetorical figures, and the status of women in society from the fifth to the early seventeenth century.
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  20.  12
    Fatal Fictions: Crime and Investigation in Law and Literature.Alison L. LaCroix, Richard H. McAdams & Martha Craven Nussbaum (eds.) - 2016 - Oxford University Press.
    Writers of fiction have always confronted topics of crime and punishment. This age-old fascination with crime on the part of both authors and readers is not surprising, given that criminal justice touches on so many political and psychological themes essential to literature, and comes equippedwith a trial process that contains its own dramatic structure. This volume explores this profound and enduring literary engagement with crime, investigation, and criminal justice. The collected essays explore three themes that connect the world of (...)
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  21.  3
    A Treatise of Human Nature: Volume 2: Editorial Material.David Fate Norton & Mary J. Norton (eds.) - 2011 - Oxford University Press UK.
    David and Mary Norton present the definitive scholarly edition of one of the greatest philosophical works ever written. This second volume begins with their 'Historical Account' of the Treatise, an account that runs from the beginnings of the work to the period immediately following Hume's death in 1776, followed by an account of the Nortons' editorial procedures and policies and a record of the differences between the first-edition text of the Treatise and the critical text that follows. The volume continues (...)
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  22.  15
    A Treatise of Human Nature: Volume 1: Texts.David Fate Norton & Mary J. Norton (eds.) - 2011 - Oxford University Press UK.
    David and Mary Norton present the definitive scholarly edition of one of the greatest philosophical works ever written. This first volume contains the critical text of David Hume's Treatise of Human Nature, followed by the shortin which Hume set out the key arguments of the larger work; the volume concludes with A Letter from a Gentleman to his Friend in Edinburgh, Hume's defence of the Treatise when it was under attack from ministers seeking to prevent Hume's appointment as Professor of (...)
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  23.  62
    Arguing for uniformity: Rethinking lyell's principles of geology.Victor Joseph Di Fate - 2011 - Perspectives on Science 19 (2):136-153.
    Charles Lyell’s Principles of Geology is widely regarded as one of the great works of 19th century science, and one of the most influential works in the entire history of the earth sciences. Yet the standard critical interpretation of the Principles makes such high regard and influence look puzzling at best. We are told, for instance, that Lyell’s argument rests on a contentious a priori methodological distinction between scientific and non-scientific explanations, the former featuring observed causes at their present intensities, (...)
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  24.  55
    The Fate of Fortune in the Middle Ages: The Boethian Tradition.Jerold C. Frakes (ed.) - 1950 - New York: Brill.
    CHAPTER ONE INTRODUCTION Previous studies of fortuna in ancient and medieval culture are numerous — to be found as full-length monographs, articles and...
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  25.  6
    Culture, Genre, and Literary Vocation: Selected Essays on American Literature.J. Leland Miller Professor of American History Literature and Eloquence Michael Davitt Bell & Michael Davitt Bell - 2001 - University of Chicago Press.
    In Culture, Genre, and Literary Vocation, Michael Davitt Bell charts the important and often overlooked connection between literary culture and authors' careers. Bell's influential essays on nineteenth-century American writers—originally written for such landmark projects as The Columbia Literary History of the United States and The Cambridge History of American Literature—are gathered here with a major new essay on Richard Wright. Throughout, Bell revisits issues of genre with an eye toward the unexpected details of authors' lives, and invites us to (...)
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  26.  3
    Ślepy los, traf, przypadek: o wpływie przeznaczenia na rzeczy i ludzkie sprawy.Katarzyna Łeńska-Bąk (ed.) - 2018 - Opole: Uniwersytet Opolski.
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  27.  6
    A Treatise of Human Nature: Being an Attempt to Introduce the Experimental Method of Reasoning Into Moral Subjects.David Fate Norton & Mary J. Norton (eds.) - 2000 - Oxford University Press.
    A Treatise of Human Nature, David Hume's comprehensive attempt to base philosophy on a new, observationally grounded study of human nature, is one of the most important texts in Western philosophy. It is also the focal point of current attempts to understand 18th-century western philosophy. The Treatise addresses many of the most fundamental philosophical issues: causation, existence, freedom and necessity, and morality. The volume also includes Humes own abstract of the Treatise, a substantial introduction, extensive annotations, a glossary, a comprehensive (...)
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  28. The Cambridge Companion to Hume.David Fate Norton (ed.) - 1993 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    David Hume is, arguably, the most important philosopher ever to have written in English. Although best known for his contributions to epistemology, metaphysics, and the philosophy of religion, Hume also made substantial and influential contributions to psychology and the philosophy of mind, ethics, the philosophy of science, political and economic theory, political and social history, and, to a lesser extent, aesthetic and literary theory. All facets of Hume's output are discussed in this volume, the first genuinely comprehensive overview of his (...)
     
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  29. Poni︠a︡tie sudʹby v kontektse raznykh kulʹtur.N. D. Aruti︠u︡nova (ed.) - 1994 - Moskva: Nauka.
     
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  30.  38
    Existence, historical fabulation, destiny.Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka (ed.) - 2009 - Springer Verlag.
    Surging from the ontopoietic vital timing of life, human self-consciousness prompts the innermost desire to rise above its brute facts. Imaginatio creatrix inspires us to fabulate these facts into events and plots with personal significance attempting to delineate a life-course in life-stories within the ever-flowing stream – existence. Seeking their deep motivations, causes and concatenations, we fabulate relatively stabilized networks of interconnecting meaning – history. But to understand the meaning and sense of these networks’ reconfigurations call for the purpose and (...)
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  31. Philosophy and Ideology in Hume's Political Thought.David Miller, David Hume & David Fate Norton - 1981 - Ethics 94 (3):534-536.
  32.  84
    David Hume: A Treatise of Human Nature (Two-volume set).David Fate Norton & Mary J. Norton (eds.) - 2007 - Clarendon Press.
    David and Mary Norton present the definitive scholarly edition of Hume's Treatise, one of the greatest philosophical works ever written. This set comprises the two volumes of texts and editorial material, which are also available for purchase separately. -/- David Hume (1711 - 1776) is one of the greatest of philosophers. Today he probably ranks highest of all British philosophers in terms of influence and philosophical standing. His philosophical work ranges across morals, the mind, metaphysics, epistemology, religion, and aesthetics; he (...)
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  33.  18
    Taste and Ideology in Seventeenth-Century France.Michael Moriarty & Centenary Professor of French Literature and Thought Michael Moriarty - 1988 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book analyses the use of the crucial concept of 'taste' in the works of five major seventeenth-century French authors, Méré, Saint Evremond, La Rochefoucauld, La Bruyère and Boileau. It combines close readings of important texts with a thoroughgoing political analysis of seventeenth-century French society in terms of class and gender. Dr Moriarty shows that far from being timeless and universal, the term 'taste' is culture-specific, shifting according to the needs of a writer and his social group. The notion of (...)
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  34.  58
    Fate, Time, and Language: An Essay on Free Will.David Foster Wallace, James Ryerson & Jay Garfield (eds.) - 2010 - New York, NY, USA: Columbia University Press.
    In 1962, the philosopher Richard Taylor used six commonly accepted presuppositions to imply that human beings have no control over the future. David Foster Wallace not only took issue with Taylor's method, which, according to him, scrambled the relations of logic, language, and the physical world, but also noted a semantic trick at the heart of Taylor's argument. _Fate, Time, and Language_ presents Wallace's brilliant critique of Taylor's work. Written long before the publication of his fiction and essays, Wallace's thesis (...)
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  35.  5
    Schicksal: sieben mal sieben unhintergehbare Dinge.Dietmar Jaegle, Ulrich Raulff, Peter Sloterdijk & Bazon Brock (eds.) - 2011 - Marbach am Neckar: Deutsche Schillergesellschaft.
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  36.  75
    Hutcheson's moral realism.David Fate Norton - 1985 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 23 (3):397-418.
    In response to kenneth winkler's criticism of my suggestion (found in my "david hume: common sense moralist, sceptical metaphysician") that frances hutcheson embraced an interesting form of moral realism. i show important differences between hutcheson and locke, amplify my previous account of hutcheson's notion of concomitant ideas, and provide evidence that hutcheson's contemporaries, including his student adam smith, believed him to have maintained "that there is a real and essential distinction between vice and virtue". ("theory of moral sentiments").
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  37. The Cambridge Companion to Hume.David Fate Norton (ed.) - 1993 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    David Hume is, arguably, the most important philosopher ever to have written in English. Although best known for his contributions to epistemology, metaphysics, and the philosophy of religion, Hume also made substantial and influential contributions to psychology and the philosophy of mind, ethics, the philosophy of science, political and economic theory, political and social history, and, to a lesser extent, aesthetic and literary theory. All facets of Hume's output are discussed in this volume, the first genuinely comprehensive overview of his (...)
     
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  38. Hume and Hutcheson: The Question of Influence.David Fate Norton - 2005 - Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy 2:2111-256.
  39. Hume and Hutcheson: The Question of Influence.David Fate Norton - 2005 - In Daniel Garber & Steven Nadler (eds.), Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy Volume 2. Oxford University Press.
  40.  81
    The Cambridge Companion to Hume.David Fate Norton & Jacqueline Taylor (eds.) - 1993 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    Although best known for his contributions to the theory of knowledge, metaphysics, and philosophy of religion, Hume also influenced developments in the philosophy of mind, psychology, ethics, political and economic theory, political and social history, and aesthetic theory. The fifteen essays in this volume address all aspects of Hume's thought. The picture of him that emerges is that of a thinker who, though often critical to the point of scepticism, was nonetheless able to build on that scepticism a constructive, viable, (...)
  41.  55
    Hume's philosophy of common life.David Fate Norton - 1987 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 25 (2):300-302.
    This is the first study to unite hume's philosophical writings with his long- neglected historical works. Hume emerges from this comprehensive reading as a philosopher whose main doctrines of knowledge and existence are structured by "historical", "narrative" categories making his empiricism unique. By reference to these categories, hume's entire philosophical enterprise takes on new meaning and his conceptions of causality, perception, imagination, reason, utility, and skepticism appear in a different light. MODERN; HISTORY; CAUSAL EXPLANATION; IDEA; NARRATIVE; DIALECTIC; LANGUAGE; CULTURE; MORAL (...)
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  42.  50
    Leibniz and Bayle: Manicheism and dialectic.David Fate Norton - 1964 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 2 (1):23-36.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Leibniz and Bayle: Manicheism and Dialectic DAVID NORTON LEIBNIZ' CLAIM that this is the "best of all possible worlds" has seemed so prima facie absurd that his critics have often considered the assertion adequately refuted by their pointing to things which are clearly "bad" and which might conceivably be "better." The paradigm case is Voltaire's Candide, which is certainly an effective refutation of Leibniz' claim at this level. We (...)
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  43.  23
    Hume's Moral Ontology.David Fate Norton - 1985 - Hume Studies 1985 (1):189-214.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:189 HUME'S MORAL ONTOLOGY* My concern here is the claim, made in my recent book, that Hume is a moral realist. In general terms I would describe this book as one of several that represent a sustained effort to consider Hume within an eighteenth-century context, an effort to see him not as a timeless figure, or to treat him as a brilliantly successful contemporary of ourselves, but as a (...)
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  44. The Bibliothèque raisonnée Review of Volume 3 of the Treatise : Authorship, Text, and Translation.David Fate Norton & Dario Perinetti - 2006 - Hume Studies 32 (1):3-52.
    The review of volume 3 of Hume's Treatise, a review that appeared in the Bibliothèque raisonnée in the spring of 1741, was the first published response to Hume's ethical theory. This review is also of interest because of questions that have arisen about its authorship and that of the earlier review of volume 1 of the Treatise in the same journal. In Part 1 of this paper we attribute to Pierre Des Maizeaux the notice of vols. 1 and 2 of (...)
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  45. Hume and Hutcheson: The Question of Influence.David Fate Norton - 2005 - In Daniel Garber & Steven Nadler (eds.), Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy Volume 2. Oxford University Press.
  46.  45
    Hume’s Common Sense Morality.David Fate Norton - 1975 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 5 (4):523 - 543.
    Hume's moral theory, I shall here argue, is explicitly and in fundamental ways a common sense theory. It is widely accepted, of course, that Hume found moral distinctions to rest on sentiment, and that he found in the principle of sympathy the means by which individual sentiments come to be experienced by others. What has not received adequate attention is Hume's concern to refute moral skepticism and his explicit reliance on appeals to “common sense,” nor,so far as I know, has (...)
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  47.  97
    More Evidence that Hume Wrote the Abstract.David Fate Norton - 1993 - Hume Studies 19 (1):217-222.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:More Evidence that Hume Wrote the Abstract David Fate Norton In the preceding paper, David Raynor has offered several reasons for discounting J. O. Nelson's unfounded claim that Adam Smith was the author ofAn Abstract of..."A Treatise ofHuman Nature." Prior to the discovery ofa copy ofthis work, it may have been plausible to suppose that the Abstract was written by someone other than Hume, but the internal evidence (...)
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  48.  35
    Thomas Reid on Adam Smith's Theory of Morals.David Fate Norton & J. C. Stewart-Robertson - 1980 - Journal of the History of Ideas 41 (3):381.
    In part one of our analysis of the unpublished lecture materials of thomas reid relating to adam smith, The authors touched on issues of provenance, Of manuscript description and arrangement, As well as of substance concerning reid's actual comments on smith. We have now provided as authentic a reproduction as possible of the relevant manuscript materials in the birkwood collection, Aberdeen, Arguing that there is a perceptible and studied order to reid's forceful objections.
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  49.  16
    John W. Danford., David Hume and the Problem of Reason: Recovering the Human Sciences.David Fate Norton - 1994 - International Studies in Philosophy 26 (2):113-114.
  50.  36
    David Hume: A Treatise of Human Nature: Volume 1: Texts.David Fate Norton & Mary J. Norton (eds.) - 2007 - Clarendon Press.
    David and Mary Norton present the definitive scholarly edition of Hume's Treatise, one of the greatest philosophical works ever written. The first volume contains the critical text of David Hume's Treatise of Human Nature , followed by the shortin which Hume set out the key arguments of the larger work; the volume concludes with A Letter from a Gentleman to his Friend in Edinburgh , Hume's later defence of the Treatise.
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