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  1.  42
    Beyond Single‐Mindedness: A Figure‐Ground Reversal for the Cognitive Sciences.Mark Dingemanse, Andreas Liesenfeld, Marlou Rasenberg, Saul Albert, Felix K. Ameka, Abeba Birhane, Dimitris Bolis, Justine Cassell, Rebecca Clift, Elena Cuffari, Hanne De Jaegher, Catarina Dutilh Novaes, N. J. Enfield, Riccardo Fusaroli, Eleni Gregoromichelaki, Edwin Hutchins, Ivana Konvalinka, Damian Milton, Joanna Rączaszek-Leonardi, Vasudevi Reddy, Federico Rossano, David Schlangen, Johanna Seibtbb, Elizabeth Stokoe, Lucy Suchman, Cordula Vesper, Thalia Wheatley & Martina Wiltschko - 2023 - Cognitive Science 47 (1):e13230.
    A fundamental fact about human minds is that they are never truly alone: all minds are steeped in situated interaction. That social interaction matters is recognized by any experimentalist who seeks to exclude its influence by studying individuals in isolation. On this view, interaction complicates cognition. Here, we explore the more radical stance that interaction co-constitutes cognition: that we benefit from looking beyond single minds toward cognition as a process involving interacting minds. All around the cognitive sciences, there are approaches (...)
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  2.  9
    Cut and break verbs in Ewe and the causative alternation construction.Felix K. Ameka & James Essegbey - 2007 - Cognitive Linguistics 18 (2).
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  3.  21
    The linguistic construction of space in Ewe.Felix K. Ameka - 1995 - Cognitive Linguistics 6 (2-3):139-182.
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  4.  62
    Cultural scripting of body parts for emotions: on "jealousy" and related emotions in Ewe.Felix K. Ameka - 2002 - Pragmatics and Cognition 10 (1):27-56.
    Different languages present a variety of ways of talking about emotional experience. Very commonly, feelings are described through the use of ¿body image constructions¿ in which they are associated with processes in, or states of, specific body parts. The emotions and the body parts that are thought to be their locus and the kind of activity associated with these body parts vary cross-culturally. This study focuses on the meaning of three ¿body image constructions¿ used to describe feelings similar to, but (...)
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