Results for 'Feminism and science'

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  1. Feminism and Science.Evelyn Fox Keller & Helen E. Longino (eds.) - 1996 - Oxford University Press.
    (Series copy) The new Oxford Readings in Feminism series maps the dramatic influence of feminist theory on every branch of academic knowledge. Offering feminist perspectives on disciplines from history to science, each book assembles the most important articles written on its field in the last ten to fifteen years. Old stereotypes are challenged and traditional attitudes upset in these lively-- and sometimes controversial--volumes, all of which are edited by feminists prominent in their particular field. Comprehensive, accessible, and intellectually (...)
     
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  2. Feminism and Science: Mechanism Without Reductionism.Carla Fehr - unknown
    During the scientific revolution reductionism and mechanism were introduced together. These concepts remained intertwined through much of the ensuing history of philosophy and science, resulting in the privileging of approaches to research that focus on the smallest bits of nature. This combination of concepts has been the object of intense feminist criticism, as it encourages biological determinism, narrows researchers’ choices of problems and methods, and allows researchers to ignore the contextual features of the phenomena they investigate. I argue that (...)
     
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  3.  2
    Feminism and Science[REVIEW]Margrit Shildrick - 1996 - Women’s Philosophy Review 16:23-24.
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  4. Radical Interpretation, Feminism, and Science.Sharyn Clough - 2011 - Dialogues with Davidson.
    This chapter’s main topic revolves around Davidson’s account of radical interpretation and the concept of triangulation as a necessary feature of communication and the formation of beliefs. There are two important implications of this model of belief formation for feminists studying the effects of social location on knowledge production generally, and the production of scientific knowledge in particular. The first is Davidson’s argument that whatever there is to the meaning of any of our beliefs must be available from the radical (...)
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  5.  55
    Feminism and Philosophy of Science: An Introduction.Elizabeth Potter - 2006 - Routledge.
    Feminist perspectives have been increasingly influential on philosophy of science. Feminism and Philosophy of Science is designed to introduce the newcomer to the central themes, issues and arguments of this burgeoning area of study. Elizabeth Potter engages in a rigorous and well-organized study that takes in the views of key feminist theorists - Nelson, Wylie, Anderson, Longino and Harding - whose arguments exemplify contemporary feminist philosophy of science. The book is divided into six chapters looking at (...)
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  6.  5
    Surveying Rape: Feminist Social Science and the Ontological Politics of Sexual Assault.Alexandra Rutherford - 2017 - History of the Human Sciences 30 (4):100-123.
    College campus-based surveys of sexual assault in the United States have generated one of the most high-profile and contentious figures in the history of social science: the ‘1 in 5’ statistic. Referring to the number of women who have experienced either attempted or completed sexual assault since their time in college, ‘1 in 5’ has done significant work in making the prevalence of this experience legible to the public and to policy-makers. Here I examine how sexual assault surveys have (...)
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  7. Feminism and Methodology Social Science Issues.Sandra G. Harding - 1987
  8.  17
    Feminism and Science Fiction.Elyce Rae Helford & Sarah Lefanu - 1991 - Substance 20 (2):110.
  9. Ecological Feminism and Ecosystem Ecology.Karen J. Warren & Jim Cheney - 1991 - Hypatia 6 (1):179 - 197.
    Ecological feminism is a feminism which attempts to unite the demands of the women's movement with those of the ecological movement. Ecofeminists often appeal to "ecology" in support of their claims, particularly claims about the importance of feminism to environmentalism. What is missing from the literature is any sustained attempt to show respects in which ecological feminism and the science of ecology are engaged in complementary, mutually supportive projects. In this paper we attempt to do (...)
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  10. Feminism and Philosophy of Science: An Introduction.Elizabeth Potter - 2006 - Routledge.
    Reflecting upon the recent growth of interest in feminist ideas of philosophy of science, this book traces the development of the subject within the confines of feminist philosophy. It is designed to introduce the newcomer to the main ideas that form the subject area with a view to equipping students with all the major arguments and standpoints required to understand this burgeoning area of study. Arranged thematically, the book looks at the spectrum of views that have arisen in the (...)
     
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  11. Feminism, Animals, and Science: The Naming of the Shrew.Lynda I. A. Birke - 1994 - Open University Press.
  12.  8
    Feminism and Methodology: Social Science Issues. [REVIEW]Tim Morris - 1990 - Radical Philosophy Review of Books 1 (1):13-15.
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  13. Book Review: Connecting Girls and Science: Constructivism, Feminism, and Science Education Reform. [REVIEW]Laura Kramer - 2005 - Gender and Society 19 (3):428-429.
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  14.  26
    Feminism and Carnap's Principle of Tolerance.Audrey Yap - 2010 - Hypatia 25 (2):437-454.
    The logical empiricists often appear as a foil for feminist theories. Their emphasis on the individualistic nature of knowledge and on the value-neutrality of science seems directly opposed to most feminist concerns. However, several recent works have highlighted aspects of Carnap's views that make him seem like much less of a straightforwardly positivist thinker. Certain of these aspects lend themselves to feminist concerns much more than the stereotypical picture would imply.
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  15. Feminism and Social Science.Alison Wylie - 1998 - In Edward Craig (ed.), Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Routledge. pp. 588-593.
  16.  9
    Ecological Feminism and Ecosystem Ecology1.Karen J. Warren & Jim Cheney - 1991 - Hypatia 6 (1):179-197.
    Ecological feminism is a feminism which attempts to unite the demands of the women's movement with those of the ecological movement. Ecofeminists often appeal to “ecology” in support of their claims, particularly claims about the importance of feminism to environmentalism. What is missing from the literature is any sustained attempt to show respects in which ecological feminism and the science of ecology are engaged in complementary, mutually supportive projects. In this paper we attempt to do (...)
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  17.  87
    Feminism and Philosophy of Science.Helen E. Longino - 1990 - Journal of Social Philosophy 21 (2-3):150-159.
  18.  18
    Feminism and the Social Construction of Scientific Knowledge.Joseph Rouse - 1996 - In Lynn Hankinson Nelson & Jack Nelson (eds.), Feminism, Science, and the Philosophy of Science. pp. 195--215.
  19. Material Feminism, Obesity Science and the Limits of Discursive Critique.Megan Warin - 2015 - Body and Society 21 (4):48-76.
    This article explores a theoretical legacy that underpins the ways in which many social scientists come to know and understand obesity. In attempting to distance itself from essentialist discourses, it is not surprising that this literature focuses on the discursive construction of fat bodies rather than the materiality or agency of bodily matter. Ironically, in developing arguments that only critique representations of obesity or fat bodies, social science scholars have maintained and reproduced a central dichotomy of Cartesian thinking – (...)
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  20.  50
    Review of Feminism and Science[REVIEW]Miranda Fricker - 1997 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 48 (4):618-620.
  21. Archaeology and Critical Feminism of Science: Interview with Alison Wylie.Alison Wylie, Kelly Koide, Marisol Marini & Marian Toledo - 2014 - Scientiae Studia 12 (3):549-590.
    In this wide-ranging interview with three members of the Department of Philosophy at the University of Sao Paolo (Brazil) Wylie explains how she came to work on philosophical issues raised in and by archaeology, describes the contextualist challenges to ‘received view’ models of confirmation and explanation in archaeology that inform her work on the status of evidence and contextual ideals of objectivity, and discusses the role of non-cognitive values in science. She also is pressed to explain what’s feminist about (...)
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  22. Feminist Philosophy and Science Fiction: Utopias and Dystopias.Judith A. Little (ed.) - 2007 - Prometheus Books.
     
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  23.  88
    Justifying Feminist Social Science.Linda Alcoff - 1987 - Hypatia 2 (3):107 - 127.
    In this paper I set out the problem of feminist social science as the need to explain and justify its method of theory choice in relation to both its own theories and those of androcentric social science. In doing this, it needs to avoid both a positivism which denies the impact of values on scientific theory-choice and a radical relativism which undercuts the emancipatory potential of feminist research. From the relevant literature I offer two possible solutions: the Holistic (...)
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  24.  84
    Feminist Philosophy of Science: History, Contributions, and Challenges.Sarah S. Richardson - 2010 - Synthese 177 (3):337-362.
    Feminist philosophy of science has led to improvements in the practices and products of scientific knowledge-making, and in this way it exemplifies socially relevant philosophy of science. It has also yielded important insights and original research questions for philosophy. Feminist scholarship on science thus presents a worthy thought-model for considering how we might build a more socially relevant philosophy of science—the question posed by the editors of this special issue. In this analysis of the history, contributions, (...)
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  25. Feminist Theory and Science: Rosi Braidotti, Transpositions: On Nomadic Ethics. Cambridge and Malden, MA: Polity, 2006. 320 Pp. (Incl. Index). ISBN 9780745635965 (Pbk) Elizabeth Grosz, Time Travels: Feminism, Nature, Power. Durham, NC and London: Duke University Press, 2005. 272 Pp. (Incl. Index). ISBN 0—8223—3566—2 (Pbk) Elizabeth A. Wilson, Psychosomatic: Feminism and the Neurological Body. Durham, NC and London: Duke University Press, 2004. 125 Pp. (Incl. Index). ISBN 0—8223—3365—1. [REVIEW]Kylie Valentine - 2008 - Feminist Theory 9 (3):355-365.
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  26. Book Reviews : Feminism, Animals and Science: The Naming of the Shrew, by Lynda I. A. Birke. Buckingham and Bristol, PA: Open University Press, 1994, 167 + Viii Pp. £37.50 (Cloth); £11.99 (Paper). Feminism and the Technological Fix, by Carol A. Stabile. Manchester & New York: Manchester University Press, 1994, 184 + Vii Pp. $59.95 (Cloth); $19.95 (Paper. [REVIEW]Anne V. Akeroyd - 1996 - Science, Technology and Human Values 21 (2):229-234.
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  27.  2
    Three Decades of Feminism in Science: From “Liberal Feminism” and “Difference Feminism” to Gender Analysis of Science.Kristina Rolin - 2004 - Hypatia 19 (1):292-296.
  28.  12
    Three Decades of Feminism in Science: From “Liberal Feminism” and “Difference Feminism” to Gender Analysis of Science.Kristina Rolin - 2004 - Hypatia 19 (1):292-296.
  29. Objectivity: Feminism, Values, and Science[REVIEW]Sharon Crasnow - 2004 - Hypatia 19 (1):280 - 291.
  30.  90
    Science and Social Inequality: Feminist and Postcolonial Issues by Sandra Harding.Sharyn Clough - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (2):197-202.
  31.  25
    Is Science Multi-Cultural? Postcolonialism, Feminism, and Epistemologies.Sandra Harding & N. Vassallo - 2001 - Epistemologia 24 (1):157-158.
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  32. Feminist Philosophy of Science: Standpoint Matters.Alison Wylie - 2012 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophy Association 86 (2):47-76.
    Standpoint theory is an explicitly political as well as social epistemology. Its central insight is that epistemic advantage may accrue to those who are oppressed by structures of domination and discounted as knowers. Feminist standpoint theorists hold that gender is one dimension of social differentiation that can make such a difference. In response to two longstanding objections I argue that epistemically consequential standpoints need not be conceptualized in essentialist terms, and that they do not confer automatic or comprehensive epistemic privilege (...)
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  33.  39
    Dewey and the Feminist Successor Science Project.Eugenie Gatens-Robinson - 1991 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 27 (4):417 - 433.
  34.  58
    Philosophy of Science After Feminism.Janet A. Kourany - 2010 - Oxford University Press.
    A feminist primer for philosophers of science -- The legacy of twentieth century philosophy of science -- What feminist science studies can offer -- Challenges from every direction -- The prospects of twenty-first century philosophy of science.
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  35.  82
    Feminist Epistemology and Philosophy of Science.Alessandra Tanesini - unknown
    Feminist epistemology and philosophy of science is the study of the significance of gender for the acquisition and justification of knowledge. At its inception, feminist epistemology was in large part concerned with science and showed more affinity with the history and philosophy of science and with social and cultural studies of science than with mainstream epistemology. Since the early 2000s, however, significant new trends have led to the production of extremely innovative work, such as a turn (...)
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  36. Book Review: Has Feminism Changed Science[REVIEW]Sarah Mitchell - 2000 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 25 (1):130-132.
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  37. Book Notices-has Feminism Changed Science?Londa Schiebinger - 2002 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 24 (3-4):545-545.
     
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  38.  14
    Feminism and Philosophy: Perspectives on Difference and Equality.Helen E. Longino & Moira Gatens - 1993 - Philosophical Review 102 (3):405.
    Summarizes author’s contextual empiricism and uses it to analyze the difference between neuro-endocrinological accounts of presumed behavioral sex differences and neuro-selectionist accounts. Contextual empiricism is a philosophical approach that both shows how feminist critique works in the sciences and makes a contribution to general philosophy of science.
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  39. Feminism and Emotion: Readings in Moral and Political Philosophy.Susan Mendus - 2000 - St. Martin's Press.
    This book combines the insights of enlightenment thinking and feminist theory to explore the significance of love in modern philosophy. The author argues for the importance of emotion in general, and love in particular, to moral and political philosophy, pointing out that some of the central philosophers of the enlightment were committed to a moralized conception of love. However, she believes that feminism's insights arise not from its attribution of special and distinctive qualities to women, but from its recognition (...)
     
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  40. Feminism and the History of Science.J. R. R. Christie - 1990 - In R. C. Olby, G. N. Cantor, J. R. R. Christie & M. J. S. Hodge (eds.), Companion to the History of Modern Science. Routledge. pp. 107--108.
  41.  19
    The Racial Economy of Science: Toward a Democratic Future, Edited by Sandra Harding; Feminism and Science, Edited by Evelyn Fox Keller and Helen Longino. [REVIEW]J. W. Grove - 1999 - Minerva 37 (2):191-198.
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  42. Feminist Intersections in Science: Race, Gender and Sexuality Through the Microscope.Lisa H. Weasel - 2004 - Hypatia 19 (1):183-193.
    : This paper investigates the mutual embeddedness of "nature" and "culture," as well as the intersections between race, gender, and sexuality, in the story of the HeLa cell line as viewed by a practicing feminist scientist. It provides a feminist analysis of the scientific discourse surrounding the HeLa cell line, and explores how feminist theories of science can provide a constructive and critical lens through which laboratory scientists can view their work.
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  43. Good Science, Bad Science, or Science as Usual?: Feminist Critiques of Science.Alison Wylie - 1997 - In Lori D. Hager (ed.), Women in Human Evolution. Routledge. pp. 29-55.
    I am often asked what feminism can possibly have to do with science. Feminism is, after all, an explicitly partisan, political standpoint; what bearing could it have on science, an enterprise whose hallmark is a commitment to value-neutrality and objectivity? Is feminism not a set of personal, political convictions best set aside (bracketed) when you engage in research as a scientist? I will argue that feminism has both critical and constructive relevance for a wide (...)
     
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  44. Education for the Heart and Mind: Feminist Pedagogy and the Religion and Science Curriculum.Joyce Nyhof‐Young - 2000 - Zygon 35 (2):441-452.
    Feminist educators and theorists are stretching the boundaries of what it means to do religion and science. They are also expanding the theoretical and practical frameworks through which we might present curricula in thosefields. In this paper, I reflect on the implications of feminist pedagogies for the interdisciplinary field of religion and science. I begin with a brief discussion of feminist approaches to education and the nature of the feminist classroom as a setting for action. Next, I present (...)
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  45. Feminism and Constructivism: Do Artifacts Have Gender?Merete Lie & Anne-Jorunn Berg - 1995 - Science, Technology and Human Values 20 (3):332-351.
    This article explores possibilities for establishing dialogues between feminism and constructivism in the field of technology studies. Based on an overview of Norwegian feminist debates about technology, it indicates several points where feminism and constructivism meet and can mutually benefit from each other. The article critically examines feminist studies questioning the problems of technological determinism, social deternacnism, and essentialism. It criticizes constructivism for a lack of concern for gender and politics but holds that it is still possible to (...)
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  46. Feminist Perspectives on Science.Alison Wylie, Elizabeth Potter & Wenda K. Bauchspies - 2010 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Feminists have a number of distinct interests in, and perspectives on, science. The tools of science have been a crucial resource for understanding the nature, impact, and prospects for changing gender-based forms of oppression; in this spirit, feminists actively draw on, and contribute to, the research programs of a wide range of sciences. At the same time, feminists have identified the sciences as a source as well as a locus of gender inequalities: the institutions of science have (...)
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  47. 'New Age' Philosophies of Science: Constructivism, Feminism and Postmodernism.N. Koertge - 2000 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 51 (4):667-683.
    This paper surveys three controversial new directions in research about the nature of science and briefly summarizes both the intellectual and sociological impact of this work. A bibliographic introduction to the major literature is provided and some fruitful directions for future research are proposed. Philosophers of science are also exhorted to perform 'community service' by correcting misunderstandings of the methods of science fostered by these new approaches.
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  48. Feminism and Ecology: Realism and Rhetoric in the Discourses of Nature.Kate Soper - 1995 - Science, Technology and Human Values 20 (3):311-331.
    Ecology and constructivism are motivated by broadly shared political aspirations and subscribe to similar critiques of technocratism, patriarchy. and "instrumental rational ity." But they diverge considerably in respect to the discourses they offer on "nature." By staging an encounter between ecological argument and feminist comtructivist theory, this article seeks to illuminate, and to indicate the means of resolving, the ontological tensions between these respective critiques of modernity. It recognizes that the constructivist emphasis on the "discursivity" of nature offers an important (...)
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  49.  19
    Feminist Critiques of Science: The Epistemological and Methodological Literature.Alison Wylie, Kathleen Okruhlik, Leslie Thielen-Wilson & Sandra Morton - 1989 - Women's Studies International Forum 12 (3):379-388.
    Feminist critiques of science are widely dispersed and often quite inaccessible as a body of literature. We describe briefly some of the influences evident in this literature and identify several key themes which are central to current debates. This is the introduction to a bibliography of general critiques of science, described as the “core literature,” and a selection of feminist critiques of biology. Our objective has been to identify those analyses which raise reflexive (epistemological and methodological) questions about (...)
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  50.  9
    Feminist Intersections in Science: Race, Gender and Sexuality Through the Microscope.Lisa H. Weasel - 2004 - Hypatia 19 (1):183-193.
    This paper investigates the mutual embeddedness of “nature” and “culture,” as well as the intersections between race, gender, and sexuality, in the story of the HeLa cell line as viewed by a practicing feminist scientist. It provides a feminist analysis of the scientific discourse surrounding the HeLa cell line, and explores how feminist theories of science can provide a constructive and critical lens through which laboratory scientists can view their work.
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