Results for 'Fictional Objects'

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Fictional Objects, Non-Existence, and the Principle of Characterization.Andrea Sauchelli - 2012 - Philosophical Studies 159 (1):139-146.
    I advance an objection to Graham Priest’s account of fictional entities as nonexistent objects. According to Priest, fictional characters do not have, in our world, the properties they are represented as having; for example, the property of being a bank clerk is possessed by Joseph K. not in our world but in other worlds. Priest claims that, in this way, his theory can include an unrestricted principle of characterization for objects. Now, some representational properties attributed to (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  2.  5
    Fictional Objects.Stuart Brock & Anthony Everett (eds.) - 2015 - Oxford University Press.
    Eleven original essays discuss a range of puzzling philosophical questions about fictional characters, and more generally about fictional objects. For example, they ask questions like the following: Do they really exist? What would fictional objects be like if they existed? Do they exist eternally? Are they created? Who by? When and how? Can they be destroyed? If so, how? Are they abstract or concrete? Are they actual? Are they complete objects? Are they possible (...)? How many fictional objects are there? What are their identity conditions? What kinds of attitudes can we have towards them? This volume will be a landmark in the philosophical debate about fictional objects, and will influence higher-level debates within metaphysics, the philosophy of mind, and the philosophy of language. (shrink)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  3. Fictional Objects: How They Are and How They Aren't.Robert Howell - 1979 - Poetics 8:129--177.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   34 citations  
  4.  5
    Unreality: The Metaphysics of Fictional Objects.Charles Crittenden - 2019 - Cornell University Press.
    Charles Crittenden here offers an original solution to one of the traditional dilemmas of philosophy—whether there can be any thing not existing, since to say that some thing does not exist seems to presuppose its existence. Drawing on the tools of Wittgensteinian philosophy and speech act theory, Crittenden argues that we can and often do make reference to unreal objects such as fictional characters, though they do not exist in any sense at all.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  5.  86
    Real Representation of Fictional Objects.Luke Manning - 2014 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 72 (1):13-24.
    ABSTRACTAssuming there are fictional objects, what sorts of properties do they have? Intuitively, most of their properties involve being represented—appearing in works of fiction, being depicted as clever, being portrayed by actors, being admired or feared, and so on. But several philosophers, including Saul Kripke, Peter van Inwagen, Kendall Walton, and Amie Thomasson, argue that even if there are fictional objects, they are not really represented in some or all of these cases. I reconstruct four kinds (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  6. Scientific Models and Fictional Objects.Gabriele Contessa - 2010 - Synthese 172 (2):215-229.
    In this paper, I distinguish scientific models in three kinds on the basis of their ontological status—material models, mathematical models and fictional models, and develop and defend an account of fictional models as fictional objects—i.e. abstract objects that stand for possible concrete objects.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   30 citations  
  7. Modal Meinongianism for Fictional Objects.Francesco Berto - 2008 - Metaphysica 9 (2):205-218.
    Drawing on different suggestions from the literature, we outline a unified metaphysical framework, labeled as Modal Meinongian Metaphysics (MMM), combining Meinongian themes with a non-standard modal ontology. The MMM approach is based on (1) a comprehension principle (CP) for objects in unrestricted, but qualified form, and (2) the employment of an ontology of impossible worlds, besides possible ones. In §§1–2, we introduce the classical Meinongian metaphysics and consider two famous Russellian criticisms, namely (a) the charge of inconsistency and (b) (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  8.  88
    Creatures of Fiction, Objects of Myth.Jeffrey Goodman - 2014 - Analysis 74 (1):ant090.
    Many who think that some abstracta are artefacts are fictional creationists, asserting that fictional characters are brought about by our activities. Kripke (1973), Salmon (1998, 2002), and Braun (2005) further embrace mythical creationism, claiming that certain entities that figure in false theories, such as phlogiston or Vulcan, are likewise abstracta produced by our intentional activities. I here argue that one may not reasonably take the metaphysical route travelled by the mythical creationist. Even if one holds that fictional (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  9. Pretense, Existence, and Fictional Objects.Anthony Everett - 2007 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 74 (1):56–80.
    There has recently been considerable interest in accounts of fiction which treat fictional characters as abstract objects. In this paper I argue against this view. More precisely I argue that such accounts are unable to accommodate our intuitions that fictional negative existentials such as “Raskolnikov doesn’t exist” are true. I offer a general argument to this effect and then consider, but reject, some of the accounts of fictional negative existentials offered by abstract object theorists. I then (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  10. A Meinongian Analysis of Fictional Objects.Terence Parsons - 1975 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 1 (1):73-86.
    This paper explores the view that there are such things as (nonexistent) fictional objects, and that we refer to such objects when we say things like "Sherlock Holmes is a fictional detective", or "Conan Doyle wrote about Sherlock Holmes". A theory of such objects is developed as a special application of a Meinongian Ontology.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  11.  26
    Fictional Objects, Future Objectives: Why Existence Matters Less Than You Think.E. M. Dadlez & C. M. Haramia - 2015 - Philosophy and Literature 39 (1A):1-15.
    Beatrice. Jane Tennison. Elizabeth Bennett. Arya Stark. Katniss Everdeen. None of them is real. All of them appear not only to engage our interest but also to move us. Some of them might even be thought to affect us further—to inspire us to do things, or at least to regard things in a different light. The set of problems typically grouped under the designation “paradox of fiction” raises questions about an apparent contradiction, about our responding emotionally to entities and events (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  12.  19
    A Meinongian Analysis of Fictional Objects.Terence Parsons - 1975 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 1 (1):73-86.
    This paper explores the view that there are such things as fictional objects, and that we refer to such objects when we say things like "Sherlock Holmes is a fictional detective", or "Conan Doyle wrote about Sherlock Holmes". A theory of such objects is developed as a special application of a Meinongian Ontology.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  13. Reid on Fictional Objects and the Way of Ideas.Ryan Nichols - 2002 - Philosophical Quarterly 52 (209):582-601.
    I argue that Reid adopts a form of Meinongianism about fictional objects because of, not in spite of, his common sense philosophy. According to 'the way of ideas', thoughts take representational states as their immediate intentional objects. In contrast, Reid endorses a direct theory of conception and a heady thesis of first-person privileged access to the contents of our thoughts. He claims that thoughts about centaurs are thoughts of non-existent objects, not thoughts about mental intermediaries, adverbial (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  14.  69
    Unreality: The Metaphysics of Fictional Objects.William W. Taschek - 1993 - Philosophical Review 102 (4):608-611.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  15. Fregean Theories of Fictional Objects.Terence Parsons - 1982 - Topoi 1 (1-2):81-87.
  16.  26
    A Controversy Over the Existence of Fictional Objects: Husserl and Ingarden on Imagination and Fiction.Witold Płotka - 2020 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 51 (1):33-54.
    ABSTRACTThis paper explores the structure and elements of the intentional experiences of imagining fictional objects. The author critically examines the argument that whereas Husserl’s theory of imagination cannot do justice to fictional objects, Ingarden’s theory of purely intentional objects provides a basis for the theory of intentionality that explains the status of fictional objects. The paper discusses this argument to show that it is justified only in regard to Husserl’s early account of imagination, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  17.  4
    Fictional Objects Within the Theory of Mental Files: Problems and Prospects.Zoltán Vecsey - 2020 - Espes. The Slovak Journal of Aesthetics 9 (2):32-48.
    A recent version of the mental file framework argues that the antirealist theory of fictional objects can be reconciled with the claim that fictional utterances involving character names express propositions that are true in the real world. This hybrid view rests on the following three claims: character names lack referents but express a mode of presentation, fictional utterances introduce oblique contexts where character names refer to their modes of presentation, and modes of presentation are mental files. (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Classical Possibilism and Fictional Objects.Erich Rast - 2010 - In Franck Lihoreau (ed.), Fiction in Philosophy.
    An account of non-existing objects called 'classical possibilism', according to which objects that don't actually exist do exist in various other ways, is implemented in a two-dimensional modal logic with non-traditional predication theory. This account is very similar to Priest's, but preserves bivalence and does not endorse dialethism. The power of classical possibilism is illustrated by giving some examples that makes use of a description theory of reference. However, the same effect could also be achieved in a more (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  19.  53
    Fictional Names Without Fictional Objects.Eleonora Orlando - 2008 - Critica 40 (120):111-127.
    In this paper, I criticize Mark Sainsbury's proposal concerning the semantic analysis of fictional discourse, as it has been put forward in chapter 6 of his Reference without Referents. His main thesis is that fictional names do not refer, and hence statements containing them are genuinely false and must be interpreted in terms of true paraphrases, arrived at on a case-by-case basis. In my opinion, the proposal has a problem derived from the fact that the relation between some (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  20.  25
    Unreality: The Metaphysics of Fictional Objects.J. A. Cover - 1994 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 54 (1):225-229.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  21. Fictional Objects.Glen R. Koehn - 1996 - Dissertation, University of Waterloo (Canada)
    The dissertation explores certain puzzles about fiction and existence. Some historical discussion of Brentano, Meinong and Russell sets the stage for an extended account of three neo-Meinongian semantic theories: those of Terence Parsons, Richard Routley , and Edward Zalta. It is argued that these authors rely on a false understanding of fiction. A distinction between setting out linguistic precedents in storytelling and following such precedents helps allow for the notion of being true in a story. However, fictional truth is (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22.  67
    Vague Fictional Objects.Elisa Paganini - 2020 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 63 (2):158-184.
    ABSTRACTI propose a different account of fictional objects from the ones already present in the literature. According to my account, fictional objects are culturally created abstract objects dependent for their existence on the pretence attitude adopted by a group of people towards a single fictional content. My work is divided into three parts: in the first one, I present how fictional objects come into existence according to my proposal; in the second part, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23.  35
    Fictional Objects.Gerald Vision - 1980 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 11 (1):45-59.
    Problems concerning identity in possible worlds and the view that proper names are rigid designators pose no threat to the doctrine that names of fictional characters (fictional names) are referential. Some philosophers, notably Saul Kripke and David Kaplan, have held otherwise; but a close examination of their arguments discovers fatal flaws in them. Furthermore, the most readily available proposals for the alternative functions of fictional names — that is, proposals in which fictional names are not referential (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24.  7
    Fictional Objects.Gerald Vision - 1980 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 11 (1):45-59.
    Problems concerning identity in possible worlds and the view that proper names are rigid designators pose no threat to the doctrine that names of fictional characters are referential. Some philosophers, notably Saul Kripke and David Kaplan, have held otherwise; but a close examination of their arguments discovers fatal flaws in them. Furthermore, the most readily available proposals for the alternative functions of fictional names — that is, proposals in which fictional names are not referential — are open (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25.  9
    Fictional Objects and Fregean Sinne.Edwin D. Mares - 1993 - In Werner Stelzner (ed.), Philosophie Und Logik: Frege-Kolloquien 1989 Und 1991. De Gruyter. pp. 65-72.
  26. Fictional Objects in Literature and Mental Representations.Jay E. Bachrach - 1991 - British Journal of Aesthetics 31 (2):134-139.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. Fictional Objects.Richard Hanley - 2009 - In Robin Le Poidevin (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Metaphysics. Routledge.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  28.  33
    Fictional Objects, Edited by Stuart Brock and Anthony Everett: Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015, Pp. Vii + 299, £45. [REVIEW]Emily Caddick Bourne - 2017 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 95 (4):810-813.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29.  27
    How to Russell Another Meinongian: A Russellian Theory of Fictional Objects Versus Zalta's Theory of Abstract Objects.Gregory Landini - 1990 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 37 (1):93-122.
    This article compares the theory of Meinongian objects proposed by Edward Zalta with a theory of fiction formulated within an early Russellian framework. The Russellian framework is the second-order intensional logic proposed by Nino B. Cocchiarelly as a reconstruction of the form of Logicism Russell was examining shortly after writing The Principles of Mathematics. A Russellian theory of denoting concepts is developed in this intensional logic and applied as a theory of the "objects' of fiction. The framework retains (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  30.  30
    How to Russell Another Meinongian: A Russellian Theory of Fictional Objects Versus Zalta's Theory of Abstract Objects.Gregory Landini - 1990 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 37 (1):93-122.
    This article compares the theory of Meinongian objects proposed by Edward Zalta with a theory of fiction formulated within an early Russellian framework. The Russellian framework is the second-order intensional logic proposed by Nino B. Cocchiarelly as a reconstruction of the form of Logicism Russell was examining shortly after writing The Principles of Mathematics. A Russellian theory of denoting concepts is developed in this intensional logic and applied as a theory of the "objects' of fiction. The framework retains (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  31.  90
    Fictional Characters, Mythical Objects, and the Phenomenon of Inadvertent Creation.Zsófia Zvolenszky - 2016 - Res Philosophica 93 (2):1-23.
    My goal is to reflect on the phenomenon of inadvertent creation and argue that—various objections to the contrary—it doesn’t undermine the view that fictional characters are abstract artifacts. My starting point is a recent challenge by Jeffrey Goodman that is originally posed for those who hold that fictional characters and mythical objects alike are abstract artifacts. The challenge: if we think that astronomers like Le Verrier, in mistakenly hypothesizing the planet Vulcan, inadvertently created an abstract artifact, then (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  32.  3
    God, Existence, and Fictional Objects: The Case for Meinongian Theism, by John-Mark L. Miravalle. Bloomsbury, 2018. Pp. 192. $114 (Hardback). [REVIEW]Mary Beth Willard - 2020 - Faith and Philosophy 37 (1):122-127.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. Deflationary (Reductive) Theories of Fictional Objects. Review and Analysis.Jacek Gurczynski - 2011 - Filozofia Nauki 19 (1):133.
  34.  22
    Reply to Sartorelli on Pretense and Representing Fictional Objects.Luke Manning - 2015 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 73 (2):193-196.
    I defend and clarify my arguments in "Real Representation of Fictional Objects" in response to criticisms from Joseph Sartorelli. In particular, I clarify why Kripke's notion of "levels of language" and a pragmatic principle suggested by van Inwagen do not support the view that works of fiction generate fictional objects but do not represent them.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35.  18
    Unreality: The Metaphysics of Fictional Objects.Mark Steven Roberts - 1993 - International Studies in Philosophy 25 (3):111-112.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36.  27
    God, existence, and fictional objects: the Case for Meinongian theism: John-Mark L. Miravalle. Bloomsbury Academic, 2018, 186 pp, $102.60.Tyron Goldschmidt - 2020 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 88 (1):133-136.
  37. If We Postulated Fictional Objects, What Would They Be?Amie Thomasson - 1999 - In Jaegwon Kim & Ernest Sosa (eds.), Metaphysics: An Anthology. Blackwell. pp. 2.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38.  17
    Unreality: The Metaphysics of Fictional Objects.J. A. Cover - 1994 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 54 (1):225-229.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39.  76
    Fictional Characters as Abstract Objects: Some Questions.Reina Hayaki - 2009 - American Philosophical Quarterly 46 (2):141 - 149.
    Sir Arthur Conan doyle wrote fifty-six short stories and four novels about Sherlock Holmes, collectively known as the Canon. The following are all true facts about the Canon: It is true according to the Canon that Sherlock Holmes is a detective. It is true according to the Canon that Queen Victoria hired a private consulting detective, gave him an emerald tiepin, and offered him a knighthood which he refused. The Canon is about Sherlock Holmes. The Canon is about a brilliant (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  40. Review of Brock and Everett (Eds.) Fictional Objects[REVIEW]Lee Walters - forthcoming - British Journal of Aesthetics.
  41.  25
    Brock, Stuart and Anthony Everett, Eds. Fictional Objects. New York: Oxford University Press, 2015, 299 Pp., $75.00 Cloth. [REVIEW]Luke Manning - 2016 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (3):318-321.
  42. Charles Crittenden, Unreality: The Metaphysics of Fictional Objects[REVIEW]Curtis Brown - 1992 - Philosophy in Review 12 (3):177-179.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43.  22
    John-Mark L. Miravalle: God, existence, and fictional objects: the case for meinongian theism: Bloomsbury Academic, 2018, 186 pp, $102.60.Tyron Goldschmidt - 2020 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 87 (1):131-134.
  44.  6
    John-Mark L. Miravalle God, Existence, and Fictional Objects: The Case for Meinongian Theism. . Pp. 186. £85.00 . ISBN 9781350061613. [REVIEW]Paul M. Gould - forthcoming - Religious Studies:1-5.
  45. Abstract Artifact Theory About Fictional Characters Defended — Why Sainsbury’s Category-Mistake Objection is Mistaken.Zsófia Zvolenszky - 2013 - Proceedings of the European Society for Aesthetics Vol. 5/2013.
    In this paper, I explore a line of argument against one form of realism about fictional characters : abstract artifact theory, the view according to which fictional characters like Harry Potter are part of our reality, but, they are abstract objects created by humans, akin to the institution of marriage and the game of soccer. I will defend artifactualism against an objection that Mark Sainsbury considers decisive against it: the category-mistake objection. The objection has it that artifactualism (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  46. Modal Meinongianism and Fiction: The Best of Three Worlds.Francesco Berto - 2011 - Philosophical Studies 152 (3):313-35.
    We outline a neo-Meinongian framework labeled as Modal Meinongian Metaphysics (MMM) to account for the ontology and semantics of fictional discourse. Several competing accounts of fictional objects are originated by the fact that our talking of them mirrors incoherent intuitions: mainstream theories of fiction privilege some such intuitions, but are forced to account for others via complicated paraphrases of the relevant sentences. An ideal theory should resort to as few paraphrases as possible. In Sect. 1, we make (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  47. Fiction and Metaphysics.Amie L. Thomasson - 1998 - Cambridge University Press.
    This challenging study places fiction squarely at the centre of the discussion of metaphysics. Philosophers have traditionally treated fiction as involving a set of narrow problems in logic or the philosophy of language. By contrast Amie Thomasson argues that fiction has far-reaching implications for central problems of metaphysics. The book develops an 'artifactual' theory of fiction, whereby fictional characters are abstract artifacts as ordinary as laws or symphonies or works of literature. By understanding fictional characters we come to (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   177 citations  
  48. Fiction and Fictionalism.R. M. Sainsbury - 2009 - Routledge.
    Are fictional characters such as Sherlock Holmes real? What can fiction tell us about the nature of truth and reality? In this excellent introduction to the problem of fictionalism R. M. Sainsbury covers the following key topics: what is fiction? realism about fictional objects, including the arguments that fictional objects are real but non-existent; real but non-factual; real but non-concrete the relationship between fictional characters and non-actual worlds fictional entities as abstract artefacts fiction (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   54 citations  
  49. Fictional Characters.Stacie Friend - 2007 - Philosophy Compass 2 (2):141–156.
    If there are no fictional characters, how do we explain thought and discourse apparently about them? If there are, what are they like? A growing number of philosophers claim that fictional characters are abstract objects akin to novels or plots. They argue that postulating characters provides the most straightforward explanation of our literary practices as well as a uniform account of discourse and thought about fiction. Anti-realists counter that postulation is neither necessary nor straightforward, and that the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   39 citations  
  50.  19
    Categorizing Moving Objects Into Film Genres: The Effect of Animacy Attribution, Emotional Response, and the Deviation From Non-Fiction.Valentijn T. Visch & Ed S. Tan - 2009 - Cognition 110 (2):265-272.
1 — 50 / 1000