Results for 'Fine Music'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  73
    The Fine Art of Repetition: Essays in the Philosophy of Music.Peter Kivy - 1993 - Cambridge University Press.
    Peter Kivy is the author of many books on the history of art and, in particular, the aesthetics of music. This collection of essays spans a period of some thirty years and focuses on a richly diverse set of issues: the biological origins of music, the role of music in the liberal education, the nature of the musical work and its performance, the aesthetics of opera, the emotions of music, and the very nature of music (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  2.  5
    The Fine Art of Repetition: Essays in the Philosophy of Music.John Andrew Fisher - 1996 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 56 (4):962-965.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  3.  11
    The Fine Art of Repetition: Essays in the Philosophy of Music.Kathleen Marie Higgins - 1994 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 52 (4):472-473.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  4.  22
    The Fine Art of Repetition: Essays in the Philosophy of Music[REVIEW]Jean G. Harrell - 1997 - International Studies in Philosophy 29 (1):139-140.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  28
    Musical Listening and the Fine Art of Engagement.Charles Morrison - 2007 - British Journal of Aesthetics 47 (4):401-415.
    When we listen to music, what do we listen to and for? How do we listen? How well do we listen and how do we listen well? This paper suggests that ‘modes of engagement’ are the active, operational means by which listeners experience music and that listening experiences more often than not involve multiple interacting modes rather than a fixed mode throughout. Modes of engagement may be voluntarily employed or involuntarily adopted; they may be technical or descriptive; they (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Rethinking Musical Modernism: Proceedings of the International Conference Held From October 11 to 13, 2007: Accepted at the Ii Meeting of the Department of Fine Arts and Music of 20 June 2008, on the Basis of the Reviews by Akademicians Dejan Despić and Dimitrije Stefanović / Editors Dejan Despić, Mileta Milin. [REVIEW]Dejan Despić & Melita Milin (eds.) - 2008 - Muzikološki Institut Sanu.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Music and Vague Existence.David Friedell - 2017 - Res Philosophica 94 (4):437-449.
    I explain a tension between musical creationism and the view that there is no vague existence. I then suggest ways to reconcile these views. My central conclusion is that, although some versions of musical creationism imply vague existence, others do not. I discuss versions of musical creationism held by Jerrold Levinson, Simon Evnine, and Kit Fine. I also present two new versions. I close by considering whether the tension is merely an instance of a general problem raised by artifacts, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  8.  32
    Ahern, Daniel R. The Smile of Tragedy: Nietzsche and the Art of Virtue. University Park, PA: Pennsylvania State University Press, 2012. Pp. Xi+ 168. Cloth, $64.95. Alican, Necip Fikri. Rethinking Plato: A Cartesian Quest for the Real Plato. Value Inquiry Book Series. Amsterdam-New York: Rodopi, 2012. Pp. Xxv+ 604. Cloth, $176.00. Allison, Henry E. Essays on Kant. Oxford-New York: Oxford University Press, 2012. Pp. Xiv+ 289. [REVIEW]Fine Music - 2013 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 51 (1):145-147.
  9.  14
    The Fine Art of Repetition: Essays in the Philosophy of Music Peter Kivy New York: Cambridge University Press, 1993, X + 373 Pp. [REVIEW]Paul Dumouchel - 1997 - Dialogue 36 (2):416-419.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  20
    The Fine Art of Repetition: Essays in the Philosophy of Music.John Andrew Fisher - 1996 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 56 (4):962-965.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. Peter Kivy, The Fine Art of Repetition: Essays in the Philosophy of Music Reviewed By.Thomas Huhn - 1994 - Philosophy in Review 14 (3):175-177.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  4
    The Influence of Chronotype on Making Music: Circadian Fluctuations in Pianists' Fine Motor Skills.Floris T. Van Vugt, Katharina Treutler, Eckart Altenmüller & Hans-Christian Jabusch - 2013 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
  13. Constitution and Qua Objects in the Ontology of Music.Simon J. Evnine - 2009 - British Journal of Aesthetics 49 (3):203-217.
    Musical Platonists identify musical works with abstract sound structures but this implies that they are not created but only discovered. Jerrold Levinson adapts Platonism to allow for creation by identifying musical works with indicated sound structures. In this paper I explore the similarities between Levinson's view and Kit Fine's theory of qua objects. Fine offers the theory of qua objects as an account of constitution, as it obtains, for example, between a statue and the clay the statue is (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  14. Fine Individuation.Carl Matheson & Ben Caplan - 2007 - British Journal of Aesthetics 47 (2):113-137.
    Jerrold Levinson argues that musical works are individuated by their context of origin. But one could just as well argue that musical works are individuated by their context of reception. Moderate contextualism, according to which musical works are individuated by context of origin but not by context of reception, thus appears to be an unstable position. And, although a more thoroughgoing contextualism, according to which musical works are individuated both by context of origin and by context of reception, faces a (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  15.  49
    Language, Music and Mind.Georges Rey - 1997 - Philosophical Review 106 (4):641.
    The central point of Raffman’s discussion is to distinguish the perception, knowledge, and effability of the standard chromatic “categorical” pitch events from what she calls “nuance” pitch events—events whose individuation is more fine-grained than C-events, and which seem to resist reliable, psychologically available categorization. Thus, two pitches a quarter-tone apart may be classified as the same C-event, even though they are different N-events. Experimental evidence suggests that whereas people are quite good at recall and discrimination of C-events, they are (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  16. Music, Indiscernible Counterparts, and Danto on Transfiguration.Theodore Gracyk - 2013 - Evental Aesthetics 2 (3):58-86.
    Arthur C. Danto’s The Transfiguration of the Commonplace is one of the most influential recent books on philosophy of art. It is noteworthy for both his method, which emphasizes indiscernible pairs and sets of objects, and his conclusion, which is that artworks are distinguished from non-artwork counterparts by a semantic and aesthetic transfiguration that depends on their relationship to art history. In numerous contexts, Danto has confirmed that the relevant concept of art is the concept of fine art. Examples (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  17. Allegory Old and New in Literature, Fine Art, Music and Theatre and its Continuity in Culture.M. Kronegger & Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka - 1994 - Springer Verlag.
    Bringing allegory into the light from the neglect into which it fell means focusing on the wondrous heights of the human spirit in its significance for culture. Contemporary philosophies and literary theories, which give pre-eminence to primary linguistics forms, seem to favor just that which makes intelligible communication possible. But they fall short in accounting for the deepest subliminal founts that prompt the mind to exalt in beauty, virtue, transcending aspiration. The present, rich collection shows how allegory, incorporating the soaring (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Harmonia, Melos and Rhytmos. Aristotle on Musical Education.Elena Cagnoli Fiecconi - 2016 - Ancient Philosophy 36 (2):409-424.
    In this paper, I reconstruct the reasons why Aristotle thinks that musical education is important for moral education. Musical education teaches us to enjoy appropriately and to recognize perceptually fine melodies and rhythms. Fine melodies and rhythms are similar to the kind of movements fine actions consist in and fine characters display. By teaching us to enjoy and recognise fine melodies and rhythms, musical education can train us to recognize and to take pleasure in (...) actions and characters. Thus, musical education can, up to a point, lead us toward the actions and character dispositions a virtuous life requires. (shrink)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  19.  7
    Lectures on the Affinity of Painting with the Other Fine ArtsThe Visual Text of William Carlos WilliamsPaul Klee/Art & Music.George W. Linden, Samuel F. B. Morse, Henry M. Sayre & Andrew Kagan - 1985 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 19 (3):115.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. Facing the Music: Voices From the Margins.Philip Alperson - 2009 - Topoi 28 (2):91-96.
    Recent philosophy of music in the Anglophone analytic tradition has produced many fine-grained analyses of musical practices within the context of the Western fine-art tradition. It has not for the most part, however, been self-conscious about the normative implications of that orienting tradition. As a result, the achievements of recent philosophical discussions of music have been unnecessarily constricted. The way forward is to enrich the range of musical practices philosophy takes as its target of examination.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  21. Why Didn’T Kant Think Highly of Music?Emine Hande Tuna - 2018 - In Violetta Waibel & Margit Ruffing (eds.), Natur und Freiheit: Akten des XII. Internationalen Kant-Kongresses. Berlin, Germany: De Gruyter. pp. 3141-3148.
    In this paper, in answering the question why Kant didn’t think very highly of music, I argue that for Kant (i) music unlike other art forms, lends itself more easily to combination judgments involving judgments of sense, which increases the propensity to make aesthetic mistakes and is ill-suited as an activity for improving one’s taste; (ii) music expresses aesthetic ideas and presents rational ideas only by taking advantage of existing associations while other art forms do so by (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  22.  90
    Nonconceptual Content and the Sound of Music.Michael Luntley - 2003 - Mind and Language 18 (4):402-426.
    : I present an argument for the existence of nonconceptual representational content. The argument is compatible with McDowell's defence of conceptualism against those arguments for nonconceptual content that draw upon claims about the fine‐grainedness of experience. I present a case for nonconceptual content that concentrates on the idea that experience can possess representational content that cannot perform the function of conceptual content, namely figure in the subject's reasons for belief and action. This sort of argument for nonconceptual content is (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  23. Music and Modernism, C. 1849-1950.Charlotte De Mille (ed.) - 2011 - Cambridge Scholars Press.
    Music and Modernism is a collection of essays which re-evaluates the significant connections between the disciplines of music, fine art and architecture in the period covering the emergence and flowering of modernism, c. 1849-1950. Combining established scholars in the field with those at the start of their careers, this book presents an exceptional cross-section of European and American modernism through a series of detailed case-studies. Avoiding a simplistic engagement with cross- or inter-disciplinarity, the focus of attention centres (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24.  55
    Wittgenstein on the Experience of Meaning and the Meaning of Music.Gilead Bar-Elli - 2006 - Philosophical Investigations 29 (3):217-249.
    An argument is presented to the effect that the ability to feel or to experience meaning conditions the ability to mean, and is thus essential to our notion of meaning. The experience of meaning is manifested in the "fine shades" of use and behavior. Theses, so obvious in music, constitute understanding music, which makes music understanding so relevant to understanding language. Applying these notions of understanding, feeling, and experience--as well as their explication in terms of comparisons, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  25.  5
    Aesthetics Lectures on Fine Art: Volume 1.Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (ed.) - 1998 - Oxford University Press UK.
    In his Aesthetics Hegel gives full expression to his seminal theory of art. He surveys the history of art from ancient India, Egypt, and Greece through to the Romantic movement of his own time, criticizes major works, and probes their meaning and significance; his rich array of examples gives broad scope for his judgement and makes vivid his exposition of his theory. The substantial Introduction is Hegel's best exposition of his general philosophy of art, and provides the ideal way into (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  26.  14
    Non‐Conceptual Content and the Sound of Music.Michael Luntley - 2003 - Mind and Language 18 (4):402-426.
    : I present an argument for the existence of nonconceptual representational content. The argument is compatible with McDowell's defence of conceptualism against those arguments for nonconceptual content that draw upon claims about the fine‐grainedness of experience. I present a case for nonconceptual content that concentrates on the idea that experience can possess representational content that cannot perform the function of conceptual content, namely figure in the subject's reasons for belief and action. This sort of argument for nonconceptual content is (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  27.  8
    Must We Choose Between Democracy and Music? On a Curious Silence in Tocqueville's Democracy in America.Damien Mahiet - 2014 - History of European Ideas 40 (3):1-21.
    ‘Among the fine arts, I clearly see something to say only about architecture, sculpture, painting. As for music, dance […], I see nothing’. Tocqueville's observation in the Rubish for the second volume of Democracy in America is not only startling, but theoretically important: it ratifies the liberal separation between musical life and political constitution. This, however, should give us cause to wonder. While in America, Tocqueville and Beaumont had multiple occasions to hear music in public festivals and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  28.  2
    How Musical Rhythm Reveals Human Attitudes.Gustav Becking - 2011 - Lang.
    What is the broadest significance of musical rhythm? Human attitudes to the world are reflected in it, according to Gustav Becking. Writing in the 1920s, Becking proposed a novel method of finding systematic differences of attitude between individual composers, between nations, and between historical time periods. He dealt throughout with Western classical music, from the period approximately 1600-1900. His method was to observe in fine detail the pattern of motion and pressure traced out by a small baton allowed (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29.  2
    Cult Music of Ancient Rus.L. V. Gurska - 2000 - Ukrainian Religious Studies 16:65-71.
    Ancient Rus church music is one of the brightest pages of spiritual and artistic culture. It is included in the synthesis of arts along with construction, monumental and fresco painting, icon painting, fine plastics, applied art, literature.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30.  6
    Batteux: The Fine Arts Reduced to a Single Principle.James O. Young - 2015 - Oxford University Press UK.
    The Fine Arts Reduced to a Single Principle by Charles Batteux was arguably the most influential work on aesthetics published in the eighteenth century. It influenced every major aesthetician in the second half of the century, and is the work generally credited with establishing the modern system of the arts: poetry, painting, music, sculpture and dance. Batteux's book is also an invaluable aid to the interpretation of the arts of eighteenth century. And yet there has never been a (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. Where Languages End: Ludwig Wittgenstein at the Crossroads of Music, Language, and the World.Eran Guter - 2004 - Dissertation, Boston University
    Most commentators have underplayed the philosophical importance of Wittgenstein's multifarious remarks on music, which are scattered throughout his Nachlass. In this dissertation I spell out the extent and depth of Wittgenstein's engagement with certain problems that are regarded today as central to the field of the aesthetics of music, such as musical temporality, expression and understanding. By considering musical expression in its relation to aspect-perception, I argue that Wittgenstein understands music in terms of a highly evolved, vertically (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  32. Teaching & Learning Guide For: Musical Works: Ontology and Meta-Ontology.Julian Dodd - 2009 - Philosophy Compass 4 (6):1044-1048.
    A work of music is repeatable in the following sense: it can be multiply performed or played in different places at the same time, and each such datable, locatable performance or playing is an occurrence of it: an item in which the work itself is somehow present, and which thereby makes the work manifest to an audience. As I see it, the central challenge in the ontology of musical works is to come up with an ontological proposal (i.e. an (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33.  1
    Kant’s “Theory of Music”.Oliver Thorndike - 2021 - Con-Textos Kantianos 14:416-438.
    One thing to expect from a theory of absolute music is that it explains what makes it so significant to us. Kant rightly observes that the essence of absolute music is our affective response to it. Yet none of the standard 18 th century theories, arousal theory and aesthetic rationalism, can explain both the universality of a judgment of taste and its subjective emotional content. The paper argues that Kant’s own aesthetic theory of aesthetic ideas is on the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34.  6
    Istituzioni ritmiche e fine del tempo." Modo" e" neuma" nel canto gregoriano e in Olivier Messiaen.Marco Mazzolini - 2010 - Doctor Virtualis 10:177-191.
    Prendendo le mosse dall’esame del ciclo pianistico Quatre études de rythme, di Olivier Messiaen , scritto fra il 1949 e il 1950, l’articolo delinea un sintetico confronto fra due differenti espressioni dell’arte musicale. Da un lato una composizione della metà del Novecento: repertorio profano, strumentale, frutto di concezioni individuali, testimonianza della fase post-tonale del pensiero musicale. Dall’altro la monodia gregoriana: repertorio sacro, vocale, anonimo, che esprime concetti formali pre-tonali. Occasione di tale raffronto è l’indagine sulla portata concettuale e tecnica di (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35.  26
    Ineffabilities of Making Music: An Exploratory Study.Daniel A. Schmicking - 2006 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 37 (1):9-23.
    Some facets of making music are explored by combining arguments of Raffman's cognitivist explanation of ineffability with Merleau-Ponty's view of embodied perception. Behnke's approach to a phenomenology of playing a musical instrument serves as a further source. Focusing on the skilled performer-listener, several types of ineffable knowledge of performing music are identified: gesture feeling ineffability —the performer's sensorimotor knowledge of the gestures necessary to produce instrumental sounds is not exhaustively communicable via language; gesture nuance ineffability —the performer is (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36. Aesthetics Lectures on Fine Art: Volume 2.Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (ed.) - 1998 - Oxford University Press UK.
    In his Aesthetics Hegel gives full expression to his seminal theory of art. He surveys the history of art from ancient India, Egypt, and Greece through to the Romantic movement of his own time, criticizes major works, and probes their meaning and significance; his rich array of examples gives broad scope for his judgement and makes vivid his exposition of his theory. The substantial Introduction is Hegel's best exposition of his general philosophy of art, and provides the ideal way into (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37. Barthes, R. (1977). Image, Music, Text. (S. Heath, Ed.)The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism (Vol. 37, P. 220). Hill and Wang. Doi:10.2307/429854Image, Music, Text. [REVIEW]Roland Barthes - 1977 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 37 (2):235-236.
    Roland Barthes, the French critic and semiotician, was one of the most important critics and essayists of this century. His work continues to influence contemporary literary theory and cultural studies. Image-Music-Text collects Barthes's best writings on photography and the cinema, as well as fascinating articles on the relationship between images and sound. Two of Barthes's most important essays, "Introduction to the Structural Analysis of Narrative" and "The Death of the Author" are also included in this fine anthology, an (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38.  16
    Resisting Aesthetic Autonomy: A “Critical Philosophy” of Art and Music Education Advocacy.Thomas Adam Regelski - 2019 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 53 (2):79.
    Music teachers are often inclined to advocate the aesthetic value of music that is uncritically propagated by their conservatory training.1 Consequently, a host of misleading assumptions that music is a "fine" art that exists solely to promote aesthetic experience is simply taken for granted as the benefits of art and music education—thus ignoring the differences of purpose between school music and university-level training. Just offering routine musical activities and performances is thereby assumed to kindle (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39.  7
    Motivos de la Antigüedad clásica en el Impresionismo musical.Beatriz Cotello - 2017 - Circe de Clásicos y Modernos 21 (1):1-14.
    El Impresionismo fue una tendencia que se desarrolló en la cultura europea de fines del siglo XIX. La música no fue ajena a esa expresión cultural, con sus modos tan apropiados para manifestar lo etéreo y evanescente. En este artículo nos detendremos en tres exponentes del impresionismo en la música: Claude Debussy, Eric Satie y Maurice Ravel, y en sus temas tomados de la antigüedad clásica: El Après midi d’un faune de Debussy, las Gimnopédies, Gnossiennes y el Socrate de Satie (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40.  3
    Performing Live: Aesthetic Alternatives for the Ends of Art.Richard Shusterman - 2000 - Cornell University Press.
    Current philosophies of art remain sadly dominated by visions of its end and lamentations of decline. Defining the very notions of art and the aesthetic as special products of Western modernity, they suggest that postmodern challenges to traditional high culture pose a devastating danger to Art's future. Richard Shusterman's new book cuts through the seductive confusions of these views by tracing the earthy roots of aesthetic experience and showing how the recent flourishing of aesthetic forms outside modernity's sacralized realm of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  41.  5
    Cohen, Herman and Mozart, Wa.William Kluback - 1989 - Idealistic Studies 19 (1):28-42.
    Music, art, and poetry were profound forces in Hermann Cohen’s thought. If we attempt to comprehend this philosopher, whose name is synonymous with the School of Marburg, that small charming town in Hesse from which Kant’s works and influence spread abroad like the magic of an irresistible melody, then we are forced to appreciate those lovers of music and art that brought him the friendship of the violinist Joseph Joachim, the admiration of painters such as Max Liebermann, Lenid (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42.  21
    Hermann Cohen and W.A. Mozart.William Kluback - 1989 - Idealistic Studies 19 (1):28-42.
    Music, art, and poetry were profound forces in Hermann Cohen’s thought. If we attempt to comprehend this philosopher, whose name is synonymous with the School of Marburg, that small charming town in Hesse from which Kant’s works and influence spread abroad like the magic of an irresistible melody, then we are forced to appreciate those lovers of music and art that brought him the friendship of the violinist Joseph Joachim, the admiration of painters such as Max Liebermann, Lenid (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43. San Alberto Magno y las bellas artes.David Torrijos-Castrillejo - 2020 - de Medio Aevo 14:117-129.
    This article aims to address the widespread thesis according to which medieval scholastics would not handle the idea of fine art. Based on a suggestion by Anzulewicz, the author shows how Albert the Great did understand the peculiarity of fine arts and put them in close relationship with liberal arts. There are fine arts, such as music, which are sought after for their own sake and can, therefore, be considered as fully liberal. In contrast to them, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44.  62
    Performing Live: Aesthetic Alternatives for the Ends of Art.Richard Shusterman - 2000 - Cornell University Press.
    The end of aesthetic experience -- Don't believe the hype -- The fine art of rap -- Affect and authenticity in country musicals -- The urban aesthetics of absence : pragmatist reflections in Berlin -- Beneath interpretation -- Somaesthetics and the body/media issue -- The somatic turn : care of the body in contemporary culture -- Multiculturalism and the art of living -- Genius and the paradox of self-styling.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  45.  93
    Philosophies of Arts: An Essay in Differences.Peter Kivy - 1997 - Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press.
    Since the beginning of the eighteenth century the philosophy of art has been engaged on the project of trying to find out what the fine arts have in common and, thus, how they might be defined. Peter Kivy's purpose in this accessible and lucid book is to trace the history of that enterprise and argue that the definitional project has been unsuccessful. He offers a fruitful change of strategy: instead of engaging in an obsessive quest for sameness, let us (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  46.  22
    The Ancient and Modern System of the Arts.James O. Young - 2015 - British Journal of Aesthetics 55 (1):1-17.
    Paul Oskar Kristeller famously argued that the modern ‘ system of the arts ’ did not emerge until the mid-eighteenth century, in the work of Charles Batteux. On this view, the modern conception of the fine arts had no parallel in the ancient world, the middle-ages or the modern period prior to Batteux. This paper argues that Kristeller was wrong. The ancient conception of the imitative arts completely overlaps with Batteux’s fine arts : poetry, painting, music, sculpture, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  47.  62
    The Dancing Ru: A Confucian Aesthetics of Virtue.Nicholas F. Gier - 2001 - Philosophy East and West 51 (2):280-305.
    The most constructive response to the crisis in moral theory has been the revival of virtue ethics, which has the advantages of being personal, contextual, and, as will be argued, normative as well. It is also proposed that the best way to refound virtue ethics is to return to the Greek concept of technē tou biou, literally "craft of life." The ancients did not distinguish between craft and fine art, and the meaning of technē, even in its Latin form, (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  48.  35
    Expressiveness, Ineffability, and Nonconceptuality.John Spackman - 2012 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 70 (3):303-314.
    In much of the discussion of expressive qualities in the 19th and 20th Centuries, music and artworks were viewed as capable of expressing emotions too fine-grained to be captured by language or concepts, and this ineffability and nonconceptuality was seen as a primary source of the value of music and the arts. In recent debates about expressive qualities, however, there has been a good deal of skepticism about both the ineffability claim and the claim about value. This (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  49.  38
    Examples as Method? My Attempts to Understand Assessment and Fairness (in the Spirit of the Later Wittgenstein).Andrew Davis - 2009 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 43 (3):371-389.
    What is 'fairness' in the context of educational assessment? I apply this question to a number of contemporary educational assessment practices and policies. My approach to philosophy of education owes much to Wittgenstein. A commentary set apart from the main body of the paper focuses on my style of philosophising. Wittgenstein teaches us to examine in depth the fine-grained complexities of social phenomena and to refrain from imposing abstract theory on a recalcitrant reality. I write philosophy of education for (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  50.  19
    Kant.Christel Fricke - 2010 - In Stefan Lorenz Sorgner & Oliver Fürbeth (eds.), Music in German Philosophy: An Introduction. University of Chicago Press.
    This chapter presents a short biography of Immanuel Kant. It then reviews his particular thoughts on musical philosophy. Kant was born on April 22, 1724 in Königsberg. He never married and died in his house on February 12, 1804. He placed the theory of cognition at the beginning of his critical transcendental philosophy, in Critique of Pure Reason. His theory of art was pointed toward identifying the place that the judgment of beautiful objects in nature and art occupies in his (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000