Results for 'Food justice'

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  1. Framing Food Justice.J. Michael Scoville - 2015 - In Jill Dieterle (ed.), Just Food: Philosophy, Justice and Food. New York: Rowman & Littlefield International. pp. 3-20.
    Articulating an account of food justice in isolation from broader questions about sustainability would leave many important normative issues unaddressed. This chapter explores the reasons for thinking that questions of food justice need to be framed within the context of the broader set of social and environmental goals that comprise sustainability. An initial difficulty faced by this proposal is that many philosophers (among others) have viewed the concept and norm of sustainability with suspicion. Reasons for this (...)
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  2.  38
    Growing Food Justice by Planting an Anti-Oppression Foundation: Opportunities and Obstacles for a Budding Social Movement. [REVIEW]Joshua Sbicca - 2012 - Agriculture and Human Values 29 (4):455-466.
    The food justice movement is a budding social movement premised on ideologies that critique the structural oppression responsible for many injustices throughout the agrifood system. Tensions often arise however when a radical ideology in various versions from multiple previous movements is woven into mobilization efforts by organizations seeking to build the activist base needed to transform the agrifood system. I provide a detailed case study of the People’s Grocery, a food justice organization in West Oakland, California, (...)
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  3.  56
    Food Ethics I: Food Production and Food Justice.Anne Barnhill & Tyler Doggett - 2017 - Philosophy Compass 13 (3):e12479.
    This piece surveys recent work on the ethics of food production and distribution, paying closest attention to animal agriculture, plant agriculture, food justice, and food sovereignty.
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  4.  60
    Learning Democracy Through Food Justice Movements.Charles Z. Levkoe - 2006 - Agriculture and Human Values 23 (1):89-98.
    Over time, the corporate food economy has led to the increased separation of people from the sources of their food and nutrition. This paper explores the opportunity for grassroots, food-based organizations, as part of larger food justice movements, to act as valuable sites for countering the tendency to identify and value a person only as a consumer and to serve as places for actively learning democratic citizenship. Using The Stop Community Food Centre’s urban agriculture (...)
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  5.  42
    Learning to See Food Justice.Beth A. Dixon - 2014 - Agriculture and Human Values 31 (2):175-184.
    Ethical perception involves seeing what is ethically salient about the particular details of the world. This kind of seeing is like informed judgment. It can be shaped by what we know and what we come to learn about, and by the development of moral virtue. I argue here that we can learn to see food justice, and I describe some ways to do so using three narrative case studies. The mechanism for acquiring this kind of vision is a (...)
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  6.  19
    Towards a More Participative Definition of Food Justice.Clement Loo - 2014 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (5):787-809.
    This paper argues that the definition of food justice must be defined in more participatory terms. Current accounts of food justice tend to emphasize distributional inequalities. However, there is broad recognition that these distributional inequalities are the result of participative inequalities and that the participation of marginalized groups in advocacy plays an important role in creating just food systems. In addition, thinking of food justice in more participative terms also suggests a more well-rounded (...)
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  7.  42
    Vulnerability, Relationality, and Dependency: Feminist Conceptual Resources for Food Justice.Erinn Cunniff Gilson - 2015 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 8 (2):10-46.
    The contemporary industrialized global food system has sustained an onslaught of criticism from diverse parties—academic and popular, scientists and social justice advocates, activists and intellectuals—criticism that has only intensified in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. Feminist voices have made substantial contributions to these critiques, calling attention to the cultural politics of food and health ; to the impact of the corporatization of agriculture on food quality, the environment, and the people of the Global South, (...)
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  8.  83
    From Food Justice to a Tool of the Status Quo: Three Sub-Movements Within Local Food.Ian Werkheiser & Samantha Noll - 2014 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (2):201-210.
    The local food movement has been touted by some as a profoundly effective way to make our food system become more healthy, just, and sustainable. Others have criticized the movement as being less a challenge to the status quo and more an easily co-opted support offering just another set of choices for affluent consumers. In this paper, we analyze three distinct sub-movements within the local food movement, the individual-focused sub-movement, the systems-focused sub-movement, and the community-focused sub-movement. These (...)
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  9.  4
    Global Food, Global Justice: Essays on Eating Under Globalization.Mary C. Rawlinson & Caleb Ward (eds.) - 2015 - Cambridge Scholars Press.
    As Brillant-Savarin remarked in 1825 in his classic text Physiologie du Goût, “Tell me what you eat, and I will tell you who you are.” Philosophers and political theorists have only recently begun to pay attention to food as a critical domain of human activity and social justice. Too often these discussions treat food as a commodity and eating as a matter of individual choice. Policies that address the global obesity crisis by focusing on individual responsibility and (...)
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  10. Mining for Justice in the Food System: Perceptions, Practices, and Possibilities. [REVIEW]Patricia Allen - 2008 - Agriculture and Human Values 25 (2):157-161.
    Despite much popular interest in food issues, there remains a lack of social justice in the American agrifood system, as evidenced by prevalent hunger and obesity in low-income populations and exploitation of farmworkers. While many consumers and alternative agrifood organizations express interest in and support social justice goals, the incorporation of these goals into on-the-ground alternatives is often tenuous. Academics have an important role in calling out social justice issues and developing the critical thinking skills that (...)
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  11.  32
    Food Justice or Food Sovereignty? Understanding the Rise of Urban Food Movements in the USA.Jessica Clendenning, Wolfram H. Dressler & Carol Richards - 2016 - Agriculture and Human Values 33 (1):165-177.
    As world food and fuel prices threaten expanding urban populations, there is greater need for the urban poor to have access and claims over how and where food is produced and distributed. This is especially the case in marginalized urban settings where high proportions of the population are food insecure. The global movement for food sovereignty has been one attempt to reclaim rights and participation in the food system and challenge corporate food regimes. However, (...)
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  12.  8
    The Tale of Two Community Gardens: Green Aesthetics Versus Food Justice in the Big Apple.Sofya Aptekar & Justin S. Myers - forthcoming - Agriculture and Human Values:1-14.
    There has been a vibrant community gardening movement in New York City since the 1970s. The movement is predominantly located in working class communities of color and has fought for decades to turn vacant land into beneficial community spaces. However, many of these communities are struggling with gentrification, which has the potential to transform access to and use of community gardens in the city and the politics around them. Drawing on separate multi-year ethnographic projects, this article compares two community gardens (...)
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  13.  19
    Whose Right to the City? Race and Food Justice Activism in Post-Katrina New Orleans.Catarina Passidomo - 2014 - Agriculture and Human Values 31 (3):385-396.
    Among critical responses to the perceived perils of the industrial food system, the food sovereignty movement offers a vision of radical transformation by demanding the democratic right of peoples “to define their own agriculture and food policies.” At least conceptually, the movement offers a visionary and holistic response to challenges related to human and environmental health and to social and economic well-being. What is still unclear, however, is the extent to which food sovereignty discourses and activism (...)
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  14.  7
    The Tale of Two Community Gardens: Green Aesthetics Versus Food Justice in the Big Apple.Sofya Aptekar & Justin S. Myers - forthcoming - Agriculture and Human Values:1-14.
    There has been a vibrant community gardening movement in New York City since the 1970s. The movement is predominantly located in working class communities of color and has fought for decades to turn vacant land into beneficial community spaces. However, many of these communities are struggling with gentrification, which has the potential to transform access to and use of community gardens in the city and the politics around them. Drawing on separate multi-year ethnographic projects, this article compares two community gardens (...)
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  15.  6
    The Tale of Two Community Gardens: Green Aesthetics Versus Food Justice in the Big Apple.Sofya Aptekar & Justin S. Myers - forthcoming - Agriculture and Human Values:1-14.
    There has been a vibrant community gardening movement in New York City since the 1970s. The movement is predominantly located in working class communities of color and has fought for decades to turn vacant land into beneficial community spaces. However, many of these communities are struggling with gentrification, which has the potential to transform access to and use of community gardens in the city and the politics around them. Drawing on separate multi-year ethnographic projects, this article compares two community gardens (...)
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  16.  17
    From Commodity Surplus to Food Justice: Food Banks and Local Agriculture in the United States.Domenic Vitiello, Jeane Ann Grisso, K. Leah Whiteside & Rebecca Fischman - 2015 - Agriculture and Human Values 32 (3):419-430.
    Amidst expanding interest in local food and agriculture, food banks and allied organizations across the United States have increasingly engaged in diverse gleaning, gardening, and farming activities. Some of these programs reinforce food banks’ traditional role in distributing surplus commodities, and most extend food banks’ reliance on middle class volunteers and charitable donations. But some gleaning and especially gardening and farming programs seek to build poor people’s and communities’ capacity to meet more of their own (...) needs, signaling new roles for some food banks in promoting community food security and food justice. This article reports the results of a national survey and in-depth case studies of the ways in which food banks are engaging in and with local agriculture and how this influences food banks’ roles in community and regional food systems. The patterns it reveals reflect broader tensions in debates about hunger relief and food security. (shrink)
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  17.  5
    Food Justice, Intersectional Agriculture, and the Triple Food Movement.Bobby J. Smith - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (4):825-835.
    Emerging as an intersectional response to social inequalities perpetuated by the mainstream food movement in the United States, the food justice movement is being used by marginalized communities to address their food needs. This movement relies on an emancipatory discourse, illustrated by what I term intersectional agriculture. In many respects, the mainstream food movement reflects contention between marketization and social protectionist discourses, while the role of food justice remains somewhat unclear as it relates (...)
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  18. Introduction to Food Justice and the Built Environment.Shane Epting - 2017 - In Ian Werkheiser & Zachary Piso (eds.), Food Justice in Us and Global Contexts. Springer Verlag.
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  19. Introduction to Food Justice and Animal Lives.Lisa Heldke - 2017 - In Ian Werkheiser & Zachary Piso (eds.), Food Justice in Us and Global Contexts. Springer Verlag.
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  20. Introduction to Food Justice and Governance.Paul Thompson - 2017 - In Ian Werkheiser & Zachary Piso (eds.), Food Justice in Us and Global Contexts. New York: Springer Verlag. pp. 165-170.
    Essay introducing other papers in the volume.
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  21. Food Sovereignty and Gender Justice.Mark Navin - 2015 - In J. M. Dieterle (ed.), Just Food: Philosophy, Justice and Food. pp. 87-100.
    Leaders of the world’s largest food sovereignty movement, La Vía Campesina, have argued that gender justice is a core component of food justice. On their view, food justice requires an end to violence against women and a guarantee of women’s equal social and political status. However, some have wondered what gender justice has to do with food. In particular, they have worried that La Vía Campesina’s embrace of radical gender egalitarianism cannot be (...)
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  22.  30
    Seeking Food Justice.Laura M. Hartman - 2013 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 67 (4):396-409.
    Seeking justice, as Christians, means seriously reconsidering our food consumption in light of multiple instances of injustice: maltreatment of workers, animals, and the environment; and misdistribution of food both globally and domestically. A variety of solutions—including boycotts, labeling, local consumption, generous donations, and Food Sovereignty—would lead to a more just food system.
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  23.  81
    Serving Social Justice: The Role of the Commons in Sustainable Food Systems.Jennifer Sumner - 2011 - Studies in Social Justice 5 (1):63-75.
    Food is a source of sustenance, a cause for celebration, an inducement to temptation, a vehicle for power, an indicator of well-being, a catalyst for change and, above all, a life good. Along with other life goods such as potable water, clean air, adequate shelter and protective clothing, food is something we cannot live without. The global corporate food system, however, allows 800 million to go hungry, while an even larger number of people grow obese. Based in (...)
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  24. GMOs and Global Justice: Applying Global Justice Theory to the Case of Genetically Modified Crops and Food[REVIEW]Kristian Høyer Toft - 2012 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (2):223-237.
    Proponents of using genetically modified (GM) crops and food in the developing world often claim that it is unjust not to use GMOs (genetically modified organisms) to alleviate hunger and malnutrition in developing countries. In reply, the critics of GMOs claim that while GMOs may be useful as a technological means to increase yields and crop quality, stable and efficient institutions are required in order to provide the benefits from GMO technology. In this debate, the GMO proponents tend to (...)
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  25. Food Deserts, Justice, and the Distributive Paradigm.Jennifer Szende - 2015 - In Jill Dieterle (ed.), Just Food: Philosophy, Justice, and Food. Rowman & Littlefield.
  26.  54
    Vote With Your Fork? Responsibility for Food Justice.Erinn Gilson - 2014 - Social Philosophy Today 30:113-130.
    As popular food writers and activists urge consumers to express their social, political, and ethical commitments through their food choices, the imperative to ‘vote with your fork’ has become a common slogan of emerging food movements in the US. I interrogate the conception of responsibility embedded in this dictate, which has become a de facto model for how to comport ourselves ethically with respect to food. I argue that it implicitly endorses a narrow and problematic understanding (...)
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  27.  9
    Vote With Your Fork? Responsibility for Food Justice.Erinn Gilson - 2014 - Social Philosophy Today 30:113-130.
    As popular food writers and activists urge consumers to express their social, political, and ethical commitments through their food choices, the imperative to ‘vote with your fork’ has become a common slogan of emerging food movements in the US. I interrogate the conception of responsibility embedded in this dictate, which has become a de facto model for how to comport ourselves ethically with respect to food. I argue that it implicitly endorses a narrow and problematic understanding (...)
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  28.  18
    Joshua Sbicca. Food Justice Now! Deepening the Roots of Social Struggle: University of Minnesota Press, Minneapolis, MN, 2018, 274pp., ISBN 978-1-5179-0401-2.Annie Shattuck & M. Jahi Chappell - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (3):643-644.
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  29.  11
    Food Justice and Narrative Ethics: Reading Stories for Ethical Awareness and Activism, by Beth A. Dixon.Erinn Gilson - 2019 - Teaching Philosophy 42 (2):164-167.
  30.  4
    Introduction to the Symposium: Rethinking Food System Transformation—Food Sovereignty, Agroecology, Food Justice, Community Action and Scholarship.Rachel Bezner Kerr, Jeffrey A. Liebert, Bobby J. Smith & T. L. Pendergrast - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (4):819-823.
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  31.  3
    Introduction to the Symposium: Rethinking Food System Transformation—Food Sovereignty, Agroecology, Food Justice, Community Action and Scholarship.T. L. Pendergrast, Bobby J. Smith, Jeffrey A. Liebert & Rachel Bezner Kerr - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (4):819-823.
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  32.  13
    Anthony Ryan Hatch. Blood Sugar: Racial Pharmacology and Food Justice in Black America. Xii + 166 Pp., Tables, Index. Minneapolis/London: University of Minnesota Press, 2016. $25. [REVIEW]Harriet A. Washington - 2017 - Isis 108 (4):948-949.
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  33.  26
    Julie Guthman: Weighing In: Obesity, Food Justice, and the Limits of Capitalism: University of California Press, Berkeley, CA, 2011, 227 Pp, ISBN 978-0-520-26625-4. [REVIEW]Amy K. Coplen - 2013 - Agriculture and Human Values 30 (3):485-486.
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  34.  10
    Garrett M. Broad, More Than Just Food: Food Justice and Community Change.Rebecca Sandover - 2017 - Environmental Values 26 (6):788-790.
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  35.  23
    Robert Gottlieb and Anupama Joshi: Food Justice.Karen A. Franck & Hanaa Hamdi - 2013 - Environmental Ethics 35 (1):127-128.
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  36.  6
    Garrett M. Broad: More Than Just Food, Food Justice and Community Change: University of California Press, Oakland, CA, 2016, 276 Pp, ISBN 9780520287440.Beth Gates - 2017 - Agriculture and Human Values 34 (4):1047-1048.
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  37.  10
    Alison Hope Alkon and Julian Agyeman : Cultivating Food Justice: Race, Class, and Sustainability: The MIT Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 2011, 404 Pp, ISBN 0262516322.Rachel S. Madsen - 2014 - Agriculture and Human Values 31 (4):685-686.
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  38.  8
    Food Justice in Us and Global Contexts.Ian Werkheiser & Zachary Piso (eds.) - 2017 - Springer Verlag.
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  39.  44
    Selective Patronage and Social Justice: Local Food Consumer Campaigns in Historical Context.C. Clare Hinrichs & Patricia Allen - 2008 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 21 (4):329-352.
    In the early 2000s, the development of local food systems in advanced industrial countries has expanded beyond creation and support of farmers’ markets and community supported agriculture farms and projects to include targeted Buy Local Food campaigns. Non-governmental groups in many U.S. places and regions have launched such campaigns with the intent of motivating and directing consumers toward more local food purchasing in general. This article examines the current manifestations and possibilities for social justice concerns in (...)
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  40.  62
    Community Food Security and Environmental Justice: Searching for a Common Discourse. [REVIEW]Robert Gottlieb & Andrew Fisher - 1996 - Agriculture and Human Values 13 (3):23-32.
    Community food security and environmental justice are parallel social movements interested in equity and justice and system-wide factors. They share a concern for issues of daily life and the need to establish community empowerment strategies. Both movements have also begun to reshape the discourse of sustainable agriculture, environmentalism and social welfare advocacy. However, community food security and environmental justice remain separate movements, indicating an incomplete process in reshaping agendas and discourse. Joining these movements through a (...)
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  41.  3
    Whose Justice is It Anyway? Mitigating the Tensions Between Food Security and Food Sovereignty.Samantha Noll & Esme G. Murdock - 2020 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 33 (1):1-14.
    This paper explores the tensions between two disparate approaches to addressing hunger worldwide: Food security and food sovereignty. Food security generally focuses on ensuring that people have economic and physical access to safe and nutritious food, while food sovereignty movements prioritize the right of people and communities to determine their agricultural policies and food cultures. As food sovereignty movements grew out of critiques of food security initiatives, they are often framed as conflicting (...)
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  42.  21
    Food Sovereignty and Gender Justice.Anne Portman - 2018 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 31 (4):455-466.
    Food sovereignty asserts the right of peoples to define and organize their own agricultural and food systems so as to meet local needs and so as to secure access to land, water and seed. A commitment to gender equity has been embedded in the food sovereignty concept from its earliest articulations. Some might wonder why gender justice should figure so prominently in a food movement. In this paper I review and augment the arguments for making (...)
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  43. Food, Environment, and Climate Change: Justice at the Intersections.Erinn Gilson & Sarah Kenehan (eds.) - 2018 - Rowman & Littlefield International.
    This volume takes a unique approach, dealing specifically with issues at the intersection of food and agricultural systems, environmental degradation, and climate change. It fills a gap in the literature on food and environmental justice in the context of global climate change offering a scholarly, yet accessible, analysis of the issues.
     
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  44. Whose Justice is it Anyway? Mitigating the Tensions Between Food Security and Food Sovereignty.Samantha Noll & Esme G. Murdock - 2020 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 33 (1):1-14.
    This paper explores the tensions between two disparate approaches to addressing hunger worldwide: Food security and food sovereignty. Food security generally focuses on ensuring that people have economic and physical access to safe and nutritious food, while food sovereignty movements prioritize the right of people and communities to determine their agricultural policies and food cultures. As food sovereignty movements grew out of critiques of food security initiatives, they are often framed as conflicting (...)
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  45.  2
    Just Food: Why We Need to Think More About Decoupled Crop Subsidies as An Obligation to Justice.Samuel Pierce Gordon - forthcoming - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics:1-13.
    In this article I respond to the obligation to institute the policy of decoupled crop subsidies as is provided in Pilchman’s article “Money for Nothing: Are decoupled Crop Subsidies Just?” With growing problems of poor nutrition in the United States there have been two different but related phenomenon that have appeared. First, the obesity epidemic that has ravaged the nation and left an increasing number of people very unhealthy; and second, the phenomenon of food deserts where individuals are unable (...)
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  46. Food Sovereignty and Consumer Sovereignty: Two Antagonistic Goals?Cristian Timmermann, Georges Félix & Pablo Tittonell - 2018 - Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems 42 (3):274-298.
    The concept of food sovereignty is becoming an element of everyday parlance in development politics and food justice advocacy. Yet to successfully achieve food sovereignty, the demands within this movement have to be compatible with the way people are pursuing consumer sovereignty, and vice versa. The aim of this article is to examine the different sets of demands that the two ideals of sovereignty bring about, analyze in how far these different demands can stand in constructive (...)
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  47. Just Food: Philosophy, Justice and Food.Jill M. Dieterle (ed.) - 2015 - Rowman & Littlefield International.
    This is a collection of thirteen new philosophical essays exploring the inequities in our contemporary food system. The book addresses topics including food and property, food insecurity, food deserts, food sovereignty, the gendered aspects of food injustice, food and race, and locavorism.
     
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  48.  66
    Food Sovereignty in US Food Movements: Radical Visions and Neoliberal Constraints.Alison Hope Alkon & Teresa Marie Mares - 2012 - Agriculture and Human Values 29 (3):347-359.
    Although the concept of food sovereignty is rooted in International Peasant Movements across the global south, activists have recently called for the adoption of this framework among low-income communities of color in the urban United States. This paper investigates on-the-ground processes through which food sovereignty articulates with the work of food justice and community food security activists in Oakland, California, and Seattle, Washington. In Oakland, we analyze a farmers market that seeks to connect black farmers (...)
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  49.  38
    The Routledge Handbook of Food Ethics.Mary Rawlinson & Caleb Ward (eds.) - 2016 - Routledge.
    While the history of philosophy has traditionally given scant attention to food and the ethics of eating, in the last few decades the subject of food ethics has emerged as a major topic, encompassing a wide array of issues, including labor justice, public health, social inequity, animal rights and environmental ethics. This handbook provides a much needed philosophical analysis of the ethical implications of the need to eat and the role that food plays in social, cultural (...)
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  50.  16
    Introduction The Political Philosophy of Food Policies, Part I: Justice, Legitimacy, and Rights.Emanuela Ceva & Matteo Bonotti - 2015 - Journal of Social Philosophy 46 (4):398-401.
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