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Frances Lawrenz [12]Frances P. Lawrenz [1]
  1.  95
    Managing Incidental Findings in Human Subjects Research: Analysis and Recommendations.Susan M. Wolf, Frances P. Lawrenz, Charles A. Nelson, Jeffrey P. Kahn, Mildred K. Cho, Ellen Wright Clayton, Joel G. Fletcher, Michael K. Georgieff, Dale Hammerschmidt, Kathy Hudson, Judy Illes, Vivek Kapur, Moira A. Keane, Barbara A. Koenig, Bonnie S. LeRoy, Elizabeth G. McFarland, Jordan Paradise, Lisa S. Parker, Sharon F. Terry, Brian Van Ness & Benjamin S. Wilfond - 2008 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (2):219-248.
    No consensus yet exists on how to handle incidental fnd-ings in human subjects research. Yet empirical studies document IFs in a wide range of research studies, where IFs are fndings beyond the aims of the study that are of potential health or reproductive importance to the individual research participant. This paper reports recommendations of a two-year project group funded by NIH to study how to manage IFs in genetic and genomic research, as well as imaging research. We conclude that researchers (...)
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  2. Empirical Analysis of Current Approaches to Incidental Findings.Frances Lawrenz & Suzanne Sobotka - 2008 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (2):249-255.
    This paper presents results found through searching publicly available U.S. data sources for information about how to handle incidental fndings (IF) in human subjects research, especially in genetics and genomics research, neuroimaging research, and CT colonography research. We searched the Web sites of 14 federal agencies, 22 professional societies, and 100 universities, as well as used the search engine Google for actual consent forms that had been posted on the Internet. Our analysis of these documents showed that there is very (...)
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  3.  89
    Recommendations for Nanomedicine Human Subjects Research Oversight: An Evolutionary Approach for an Emerging Field.Leili Fatehi, Susan M. Wolf, Jeffrey McCullough, Ralph Hall, Frances Lawrenz, Jeffrey P. Kahn, Cortney Jones, Stephen A. Campbell, Rebecca S. Dresser, Arthur G. Erdman, Christy L. Haynes, Robert A. Hoerr, Linda F. Hogle, Moira A. Keane, George Khushf, Nancy M. P. King, Efrosini Kokkoli, Gary Marchant, Andrew D. Maynard, Martin Philbert, Gurumurthy Ramachandran, Ronald A. Siegel & Samuel Wickline - 2012 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 40 (4):716-750.
    Nanomedicine is yielding new and improved treatments and diagnostics for a range of diseases and disorders. Nanomedicine applications incorporate materials and components with nanoscale dimensions where novel physiochemical properties emerge as a result of size-dependent phenomena and high surface-to-mass ratio. Nanotherapeutics and in vivo nanodiagnostics are a subset of nanomedicine products that enter the human body. These include drugs, biological products, implantable medical devices, and combination products that are designed to function in the body in ways unachievable at larger scales. (...)
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  4.  3
    Empirical Analysis of Current Approaches to Incidental Findings.Frances Lawrenz & Suzanne Sobotka - 2008 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (2):249-255.
    Researchers in the health sciences regularly discover information of potential health importance unrelated to their object of study in the course of their research. However, there appears to be little guidance available on what researchers should do with this information, known in the scientific literature as incidental findings. The study described here was designed to determine the extent of guidance available to researchers from public sources. This empirical study was part of a larger two-year project funded by the National Human (...)
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  5.  18
    Key Expert Stakeholder Perceptions of the Law of Genomics: Identified Problems and Potential Solutions.Fook Yee Cheung, Lauren Clatch, Susan M. Wolf, Ellen Wright Clayton & Frances Lawrenz - 2020 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 48 (1):87-104.
    The law applicable to genomics in the United States is currently in transition and under debate. The rapid evolution of the science, burgeoning clinical research, and growing clinical application pose serious challenges for federal and state law. Although there has been some empirical work in this area, this is the first paper to survey and interview key scientific and legal stakeholders in the field of genomics to help ground identification of the most important legal problems that must be solved to (...)
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  6.  21
    The Past, Present, and Future of Informed Consent in Research and Translational Medicine.Susan M. Wolf, Ellen Wright Clayton & Frances Lawrenz - 2018 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 46 (1):7-11.
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  7.  18
    An Empirical Examination of the Current State of Publically Available Nanotechnology Guidance Materials.Laura Fleege & Frances Lawrenz - 2012 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 40 (4):751-762.
    As part of “Nanodiagnostics and Nanotherapeutics: Building Research Ethics and Oversight,” an empirical search was conducted to identify publicly available resources that guided understanding about human subjects issues in nanomedicine or nanotechnology including policy statements, guidance documents, or consent forms. The authors conducted 5,083 internet searches and analyzed 175 documents. Results show that very little guidance is publicly available and most documents focused on occupational and environmental concerns.
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  8.  3
    An Empirical Examination of the Current State of Publically Available Nanotechnology Guidance Materials.Laura Fleege & Frances Lawrenz - 2012 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 40 (4):751-762.
    Nanotechnology not only offers the promise of new enhancements to existing materials but also allows for the development of new materials and devices. The potential applications of nanotechnology range from medicine to agriculture to health and environmental science and beyond. Nanotechnology is growing at such a rate that Lux Research in 2007 estimated that nanotechnology will be incorporated into 15% of global manufactured goods by 2014. The U.S. National Nanotechnology Initiative defines nanotechnology as the following: “ Research and technology development (...)
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  9.  16
    A Summary of Research in Science Education‐1990.Fred Finley, Frances Lawrenz & Patricia Heller - 1992 - Science Education 76 (3):239-281.
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  10. Evaluation of a teacher inservice training program in physical science.Frances Lawrenz - 1987 - Science Education 71 (2):251-258.
     
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  11. The science achievement of various subgroups on alternative assessment formats.Frances Lawrenz, Douglas Huffman & Wayne Welch - 2001 - Science Education 85 (3):279-290.
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  12. Using time‐series design in the assessment of teaching effectiveness.Huann Shyang Lin & Frances Lawrenz - 1999 - Science Education 83 (4):409-422.
     
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  13.  10
    Introduction: The Crucial Role of Law in Supporting Successful Translation of Genomics into Clinical Care.Susan M. Wolf, Ellen Wright Clayton & Frances Lawrenz - 2020 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 48 (1):7-10.