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  1.  19
    Mysl' and the Intuitivist Debate in the Early 1920s.Frances Nethercott - 1991 - Studies in Soviet Thought 41 (3):207-224.
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  2.  39
    Mysl' and the Intuitivist Debate in the Early 1920s.Frances Nethercott - 1991 - Studies in East European Thought 41 (3):207-224.
  3.  38
    Andrzej de Lazari Et Al. (Eds.), Idei V Rossii/Idee W Rosji/Ideas in Russia; Leksykon Rosyjsko-Polsko-Angielski.Manon de Courten, Pauline Schrooyen, Anton Simons, Evert van der Zweerde & Frances Nethercott - 2000 - Studies in East European Thought 52 (3):227-237.
  4.  27
    Aileen M. Kelly, Views From the Other Shore. Essays on Herzen, Chekhov, and Bakhtin.Frances Nethercott - 2001 - Studies in East European Thought 53 (4):329-336.
  5.  18
    Book Review. [REVIEW]Frances Nethercott - 2006 - Studies in East European Thought 58 (1):37-41.
  6. Discipline or Punish?: Russian Criminal Justice in the Era of Reform.Frances Nethercott - 2004 - Rechtstheorie 35 (3):335-354.
     
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  7.  17
    Preface.Frances Nethercott - 1994 - Studies in East European Thought 46 (3):149-152.
  8.  1
    Rethinking History: The 1964 Interdisciplinary Conference «On Methodological Questions of Historical Science».Frances Nethercott - 2018 - Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 73 (2):251-264.
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  9.  30
    The Concept of Lichnost’ in Criminal Law Theory, 1860s–1900s.Frances Nethercott - 2009 - Studies in East European Thought 61 (2-3):189 - 196.
    This essay discusses criminal law theories in late Imperial Russia. It argues that, although the political climate of Reform and Counter Reform effectively undermined attempts to implement new legislation premised on the idea of the 'rights-enabled person' (pravovaya lichnosf), paradoxically, it fostered the growth of juridical scholarship. Russian criminal law theorists engaged critically with Western juridical science, which, beginning in the 1870s, witnessed a shift away from absolutist theories inspired by the classics of philosophical idealism towards various strains of positivism (...)
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  10.  7
    The Concept of Lichnost’ in Criminal Law Theory, 1860s–1900s.Frances Nethercott - 2009 - Studies in East European Thought 61 (2-3):189-196.
    This essay discusses criminal law theories in late Imperial Russia. It argues that, although the political climate of Reform and Counter Reform effectively undermined attempts to implement new legislation premised on the idea of the 'rights-enabled person', paradoxically, it fostered the growth of juridical scholarship. Russian criminal law theorists engaged critically with Western juridical science, which, beginning in the 1870s, witnessed a shift away from absolutist theories inspired by the classics of philosophical idealism towards various strains of positivism arguing for (...)
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