8 found
Order:
  1.  10
    Babylonian Horoscopes.J. M. Steele & Francesca Rochberg - 1999 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 119 (3):524.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  2.  6
    Personifications and Metaphors in Babylonian Celestial Omina.Francesca Rochberg - 1996 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 116 (3):475-485.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  3.  5
    Empiricism in Babylonian Omen Texts and the Classification of Mesopotamian Divination as Science.Francesca Rochberg - 1999 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 119 (4):559.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  4.  6
    Lunar Data in Babylonian Horoscopes.Francesca Rochberg - 2003 - Centaurus 45 (1-4):32-45.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  19
    Conditionals, Inference, and Possibility in Ancient Mesopotamian Science.Francesca Rochberg - 2009 - Science in Context 22 (1):5-25.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  8
    The Historical Significance of Astronomy in Roman EgyptAstronomical Papyri From Oxyrhynchus . Alexander Jones.Francesca Rochberg - 2001 - Isis 92 (4):745-748.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  12
    The Scientific Imagination of the Other: G. E. R. Lloyd: Being, Humanity, and Understanding: Studies in Ancient and Modern Societies. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012, 136pp, £25.00 HB.Francesca Rochberg - 2014 - Metascience 23 (1):165-168.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  22
    A Consideration Of Babylonian Astronomy Within The Historiography Of Science.Francesca Rochberg - 2002 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 33 (4):661-684.
    This paper traces the reception of Babylonian astronomy into the history of science, beginning in early to mid twentieth century when cuneiform astronomical sources became available to the scholarly public. The dominant positivism in philosophy of science of this time influenced criteria employed in defining and demarcating science by historians, resulting in a persistently negative assessment of the nature of knowledge evidenced in cuneiform sources. Ancient Near Eastern astronomy was deemed pre- or non-scientific, and even taken to reflect a stage (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation