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  1.  17
    The Limits of the Buddhist Embrace of Science: Commentary on “Compassion, Ethics, and Neuroscience: Neuroethics Through Buddhist Eyes”.Francisca Cho - 2012 - Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (3):539-542.
    The readiness of Buddhists to dialogue with and embrace modern science has caused some to worry that this encounter will deform Buddhist traditions for the sake of acceptance by the West. But their strong tradition of epistemological skepticism and intellectual pluralism makes it unlikely that Buddhists will embrace scientific positivism. Given the tensions between religion and science in contemporary western society, it is perhaps this feature of Buddhism that can make the most fruitful contribution in its dialogue with science.
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  2. Comparing Stories About the Origin, Extent, and Future of Life : An Asian Religious Perspective.Francisca Cho - 2009 - In Constance M. Bertka (ed.), Exploring the Origin, Extent, and Future of Life: Philosophical, Ethical, and Theological Perspectives. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  3.  39
    Mencius and Early Chinese Thought.Francisca Cho - 2004 - International Studies in Philosophy 36 (1):299-300.
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    The Funny Thing About Secularism: Christian and Buddhist Versions Compared.Francisca Cho - 2017 - Philosophy, Theology and the Sciences 4 (1):74.
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  5.  8
    The Author Replies [to Lovin and Green].Francisca Cho - 1998 - Journal of Religious Ethics 26 (1):185 - 187.
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  6.  10
    Leaping Into the Boundless: A Daoist Reading of Comparative Religious Ethics.Francisca Cho - 1998 - Journal of Religious Ethics 26 (1):139-165.
    This essay seeks to step beyond the argument between ethical formalism and ethical naturalism concerning the nature of moral reason and to step outside the universalism versus relativism debate in cross-cultural studies. Its thesis is that both formalism and naturalism advance versions of moral reason that are functionaries of intellectual discussions that make sense of behavior and that such discussion should not be confused with the ostensible object of ethical inquiry-that is, with moral actions and the motivations that drive them. (...)
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