13 found
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  1.  4
    Considering Medical Assistance in Dying for Minors: The Complexities of Children’s Voices.Harprit Kaur Singh, Mary Ellen Macdonald & Franco A. Carnevale - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (6):399-404.
    Medical assistance in dying legislation in Canada followed much deliberation after the Supreme Court of Canada’s ruling in Carter v. Canada. Included in this deliberation was the Special Joint Committee on Physician Assisted Dying’s recommendation to extend MAID legislation beyond the inclusion of adults to mature minors. Children's agency is a construct advanced within childhood studies literature which entails eliciting children’s voices in order to recognise children as active participants in constructing their own childhoods. Using this framework, we consider the (...)
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  2.  9
    Ethical Care of the Critically Ill Child: A Conception of a ‘Thick’ Bioethics.Franco A. Carnevale - 2005 - Nursing Ethics 12 (3):239-252.
    In this article I argue for an interpretive approach to bioethics with critically ill children. I begin by highlighting the dominant Anglo-American bioethical framework that defines standards for ethical care in critically ill children and then outline a critique of this framework. Drawing predominantly on the ideas of Charles Taylor, Michael Walzer and Richard Zaner, I call for a reconception of bioethics and propose an interpretive ‘thick’ framework that is centred on culture and context. Finally, I illustrate this interpretive approach (...)
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  3.  34
    A Conceptual and Moral Analysis of Suffering.Franco A. Carnevale - 2009 - Nursing Ethics 16 (2):173-183.
    This analysis presents an epistemological and moral examination of suffering. It addresses the specific questions: (1) What is suffering? (2) Can one's suffering be assessed by another? and (3) What is the moral significance of suffering? The epistemological analysis is orientated by Peter Hacker's framework for the investigation of emotions, demonstrating that suffering is an emotion. This leads to a discussion of whether suffering is a phenomenon that can be evaluated objectively by another person who is not experiencing the suffering, (...)
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  4.  16
    A Hermeneutical Rapprochement Framework for Clinical Ethics Practice.Franco A. Carnevale - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (3):674-687.
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  5.  54
    Charles Taylor, Hermeneutics and Social Imaginaries: A Framework for Ethics Research.Franco A. Carnevale - 2013 - Nursing Philosophy 14 (2):86-95.
    Hermeneutics, also referred to as interpretive phenomenology, has led to important contributions to nursing research. The philosophy of Charles Taylor has been a major source in the development of contemporary hermeneutics, through his ontological and epistemological articulations of the human sciences. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate that Taylor's ideas can further enrich hermeneutic inquiry in nursing research, particularly for investigations of ethical concerns. The paper begins with an outline of Taylor's hermeneutical framework, followed by a review of (...)
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  6. Engagement and Suffering in Responsible Caregiving: On Overcoming Maleficience in Health Care.Dawson S. Schultz & Franco A. Carnevale - 1996 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 17 (3).
    The thesis of this article is that engagement and suffering are essential aspects of responsible caregiving. The sense of medical responsibility engendered by engaged caregiving is referred to herein as clinical phronesis, i.e. practical wisdom in health care, or, simply, practical health care wisdom. The idea of clinical phronesis calls to mind a relational or communicative sense of medical responsibility which can best be understood as a kind of virtue ethics, yet one that is informed by the exigencies of moral (...)
     
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  7.  24
    Decisional Challenges for Children Requiring Assisted Ventilation at Home.Kathleen Cranley Glass & Franco A. Carnevale - 2006 - HEC Forum 18 (3):207-221.
  8.  5
    Ethical Considerations in Cross-Linguistic Nursing.Franco A. Carnevale, Bilkis Vissandjée, Amy Nyland & Ariane Vinet-Bonin - 2009 - Nursing Ethics 16 (6):813-826.
    This article reviews empirical evidence and ethical norms in cross-linguistic nursing. Empirical evidence highlights that linguistic barriers between nurses and patients can perpetuate discrimination and compromise nursing care. There are significant organizational and relational challenges involved in ensuring adequate use of interpreters by nurses. Some evidence suggests that linguistic barriers are particularly problematic for nurses when compared with physicians. A comparative analysis of nursing ethical norms for cross-linguistic nursing was conducted using the codes of ethics of the American Nurses Association, (...)
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  9.  9
    The Birth of Tragedy in Pediatrics: A Phronetic Conception of Bioethics.Franco A. Carnevale - 2007 - Nursing Ethics 14 (5):571-582.
    Accepted standards of parental decisional autonomy and child best interests do not address adequately the complex moral problems involved in the care of critically ill children. A growing body of moral discourse is calling for the recognition of `tragedy' in selected human problems. A tragic dilemma is an irresolvable dilemma with forced terrible alternatives, where even the virtuous agent inescapably emerges with `dirty hands'. The shift in moral framework described here recognizes that the form of conduct called for by tragic (...)
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  10.  19
    Validity of the Italian Code of Ethics for Everyday Nursing Practice.Paola Gobbi, Maria Grazia Castoldi, Rosa Anna Alagna, Anna Brunoldi, Chiara Pari, Annamaria Gallo, Miriam Magri, Lorena Marioni, Giovanni Muttillo, Claudia Passoni, Anna La Torre, Debora Rosa & Franco A. Carnevale - forthcoming - Nursing Ethics:096973301667787.
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  11.  6
    The Palliation of Dying: A Heideggerian Analysis of the “Technologization” of Death.Franco A. Carnevale - 2005 - Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 5 (1):1-12.
    The modern West has vigorously sought to overcome death, or at the very least minimize the suffering that it entails. Whereas the former has been predominantly pursued through modern scientific medicine, the minimization of the adversity of death and dying has been sought through ‘death technologies’. This technologization of death is analyzed in light of Martin Heidegger’s phenomenological philosophy. The analysis begins with an outline of the fundamental tenets of Heidegger’s ‘philosophy of Being’. In turn, his philosophical framework is utilized (...)
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  12.  2
    Exploring a Hermeneutic Perspective of Nursing Through Revisiting Nursing Health History.Julie Frechette & Franco A. Carnevale - 2020 - Nursing Philosophy 21 (2).
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  13.  30
    Qualitative Health Research and the Irb: Answering the “so What?” With Qualitative Inquiry. [REVIEW]Mary Ellen Macdonald & Franco A. Carnevale - 2008 - Journal of Academic Ethics 6 (1):1-5.
    Qualitative inquiry is increasingly used to foster change in health policy and practice. Research ethics committees often misunderstand qualitative inquiry, assuming its design can be judged by criteria of quantitative science. Traditional health research uses scientific realist standards as a means-to-an-end, answering the question “So what?” to support the advancement of practice and policy. In contrast, qualitative inquiry often draws on constructivist paradigms, generating knowledge either as an end-in-itself or as a means to foster change. When reviewers inappropriately judge qualitative (...)
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