Results for 'Frank E. Ritter'

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  1. Soar.Frank E. Ritter - 2003 - In L. Nadel (ed.), Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science. Nature Publishing Group.
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  2. Production Systems and Rule‐Based Inference.Gary Jones & Frank E. Ritter - 2003 - In L. Nadel (ed.), Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science. Nature Publishing Group.
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  3.  82
    Learning From Examples Does Not Prevent Order Effects in Belief Revision.Frank E. Ritter, Josef F. Krems & Martin R. K. Baumann - 2010 - Thinking and Reasoning 16 (2):98-130.
    A common finding is that information order influences belief revision (e.g., Hogarth & Einhorn, 1992). We tested personal experience as a possible mitigator. In three experiments participants experienced the probabilistic relationship between pieces of information and object category through a series of trials where they assigned objects (planes) into one of two possible categories (hostile or commercial), given two sequentially presented pieces of probabilistic information (route and ID), and then they had to indicate their belief about the object category before (...)
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  4.  11
    Modeling How, When, and What Is Learned in a Simple Fault‐Finding Task.Frank E. Ritter & Peter A. Bibby - 2008 - Cognitive Science 32 (5):862-892.
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  5. Automatically Recording Keystrokes in Public Clusters with RUI: Issues and Sample Answers.Jong W. Kim & Frank E. Ritter - 2007 - In McNamara D. S. & Trafton J. G. (eds.), Proceedings of the 29th Annual Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society. pp. 1787.
     
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  6. From Modeler-Free Individual Data Fitting to 3-D Parametric Prediction Landscapes: A Research Expedition.Sue E. Kase, Frank E. Ritter & Michael Schoelles - 2008 - In B. C. Love, K. McRae & V. M. Sloutsky (eds.), Proceedings of the 30th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society. pp. 1398--1403.
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  7.  16
    Introduction to the Issue on Computational Models of Memory: Selected Papers From the International Conference on Cognitive Modeling.David Reitter & Frank E. Ritter - 2017 - Topics in Cognitive Science 9 (1):48-50.
    Computational models of memory presented in this issue reflect varied empirical data and levels of representation. From mathematical models to neural and cognitive architectures, all aim to converge on a unified theory of the mind.
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  8.  2
    Cognitive Modeling of Automation Adaptation in a Time Critical Task.Junya Morita, Kazuhisa Miwa, Akihiro Maehigashi, Hitoshi Terai, Kazuaki Kojima & Frank E. Ritter - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
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  9.  3
    Editor's Review and Introduction: Cognition‐Inspired Artificial Intelligence.Daniel N. Cassenti, Vladislav D. Veksler & Frank E. Ritter - 2022 - Topics in Cognitive Science 14 (4):652-664.
    Topics in Cognitive Science, Volume 14, Issue 4, Page 652-664, October 2022.
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  10.  8
    William E. Ritter. Notation Systems and an Effective Fixed Point Property. Proceedings of the American Mathematical Society, Vol. 17 , Pp. 390–395. [REVIEW]Helmut Pfeiffer - 1975 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 40 (4):626.
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  11.  4
    Europäische Philosophie der Gegenwart. By I. M. Bochenski A. Franke Ag. Verlag, Bern, Switzerland, 1947. 304 Pages.Frank E. Hartung - 1950 - Philosophy of Science 17 (4):360-361.
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  12.  2
    Kostas Kampourakis & Tobias Uller (eds.), Philosophy of Science for Biologists, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2020.Frank E. Zachos - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (3):1-3.
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  13. David Kimhi. The Man and the Commentaries.Frank E. Talmage - 1975
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  14. The Neuropsychology of Insight in Psychiatric and Neurological Disorders.Frank Laroi & William B. Barr & Richard S. E. Keefe - 2004 - In Xavier F. Amador & Anthony S. David (eds.), Insight and Psychosis: Awareness of Illness in Schizophrenia and Related Disorders. Oxford University Press.
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  15. The Science of Philosophy.Frank E. Lazowick - 1959 - New York: Philosophical Library.
  16. Reflections of a Wayside Philosopher.Frank E. Ogilvie - 1954 - New York: Exposition Press.
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  17.  9
    Four Modes of Theravāda Action.Frank E. Reynolds - 1979 - Journal of Religious Ethics 7 (1):12 - 26.
    Theravāda Buddhists draw a doctrinal distinction between otherworldly (lokuttara) and this-worldly (lokiya) actions, and also an ecclesiastical distinction between bhikkhu (wandering mendicant or 4 "monastic") action and lay action. Within the Theravāda tradition these modes of action have overlapped to form a more empirically relevant set. This set is constituted by the otherworldly action of the path winning bhikkhus, the this-worldly action of ordinary bhikkhus, the path winning or bodhisatta (future Buddha) action of exceptional laymen, and the this-worldly action of (...)
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  18. The Search Eternal.Frank E. Brower - 1971 - Old Tappan, N.J., Revell.
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  19. Science and Transcendence: From the Self-Transcendence of Scientific Knowing to Faith in the Transcendent Source.Frank E. Budenholzer - 2009 - Budhi: A Journal of Ideas and Culture 13 (1-3).
     
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  20. Darwin and Development: Why Ontogeny Does Not Recapitualte Phylogeny for Human Concepts.Frank Keil & George E. Newman - 2010 - In Denis Mareschal, Paul Quinn & Stephen E. G. Lea (eds.), The Making of Human Concepts. Oxford University Press.
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  21.  16
    The Sociology of Positivism.Frank E. Hartung - 1944 - Science and Society 8 (4):328 - 341.
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  22.  5
    Pike, Kenneth Lee (1912-2000).Frank E. Robbins - 2006 - In Keith Brown (ed.), Encyclopedia of Language and Linguistics. Elsevier. pp. 9--607.
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  23.  4
    Frank E. Morris 1889-1963.Robert W. Jordan - 1963 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 37:122 - 123.
  24. Frank E. Manuel, "Shapes of Philosophical History". [REVIEW]Stanley M. Daugert - 1968 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 6 (2):171.
     
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  25. Origins of Life Science Teachers' Beliefs Underlying Curriculum Reform in Texas.Frank E. Crawley & Barbara A. Salyer - 1995 - Science Education 79 (6):611-635.
  26. Attitude Research in Science Education: Contemporary Models and Methods.Frank E. Crawley & Thomas R. Koballa - 1994 - Science Education 78 (1):35-55.
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  27. Comte de Saint-Simon: The Pear is Ripe.Frank E. Manuel - 1997 - In Raymond Boudon, Mohamed Cherkaoui & Jeffrey C. Alexander (eds.), The Classical Tradition in Sociology: The European Tradition. Sage Publications. pp. 1--301.
     
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  28. Isaac Newton, Historian.Frank E. Manuel - 1965 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 15 (60):354-356.
     
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  29.  19
    Biometry.Frank E. Lutz - 1905 - Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 2 (1):12-16.
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  30.  5
    Effects of Taxonomic Instances as Implicit Associative Responses on Verbal Discrimination Learning.Frank E. Fulkerson & Lawrence A. Prindaville - 1973 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 101 (2):383.
  31. The Challenge of Paying for Medicare: Issues and Options.Frank E. Samuel - forthcoming - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy.
     
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  32. The Public and Private in Saudi Arabia: Restrictions on the Powers of Committees for Ordering the Good and Forbidding the Evil.Frank E. Vogel - 2003 - Social Research: An International Quarterly 70 (3):749-768.
    My paper will explore boundaries and rights, the public and the private, as to the enforcement of religious legal rules in societies self-consciously founded on Islamic law. I employ as my case-study legal and social controversies aroused by the Saudi Hay’at al-amr bi-al-ma`ruf wa-al-nahy `an al-munkar, the government agency charged with “ordering the good and forbidding the evil.” The paper will first lay out some of the laws fixing the powers of the Hay’at, including various statutes issued by the king (...)
     
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  33.  1
    Socrates in the Schools: Gains at Three-Year Follow-Up.Frank Fair, Lory E. Haasa, Carol Gardosik, Daphne Johnson, Debra Price & Olena Leipnik - 2015 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 2 (2):5-16.
    Three recent research reports by Topping and Trickey, by Fair and colleagues, and by Gorard, Siddiqui and Huat See have produced data that support the conclusion that a Philosophy for Children program of one-hour-per-week structured discussions has a marked positive impact on students. This article presents data from a follow up study done three years after the completion of the study reported in Fair et al.. The data show that the positive gains in scores on the Cognitive Abilities Test were (...)
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  34.  5
    Review: William E. Ritter, Notation Systems and an Effective Fixed Point Property. [REVIEW]Helmut Pfeiffer - 1975 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 40 (4):626-626.
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  35.  7
    Scott D. Westrem. The Hereford Map: A Transcription and Translation of the Legends with Commentary. Lxxxvi+476 Pp., Illus., Apps. Turnhout: Brepols Publishers, 2001. [REVIEW]Frank E. Barmore - 2003 - Isis 94 (4):710-711.
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  36.  5
    Contemporary Idealism in America.Frank E. Morris - 1933 - Journal of Philosophy 30 (7):187-190.
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  37.  43
    Some Comments on The Problem of Reductionism in Contemporary Physical Science.Frank E. Budenholzer - 2003 - Zygon 38 (1):61-69.
  38.  56
    Science and Religion: Seeking a Common Horizon.Frank E. Budenholzer - 1984 - Zygon 19 (3):351-368.
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  39. Religion and Science in Taiwan: Rethinking the Connection.Frank E. Budenholzer - 2001 - Zygon 36 (4):753-764.
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  40. Emergence, Probability, and Reductionism.Frank E. Budenholzer - 2004 - Zygon 39 (2):339-356.
    . Philosopher-theologian Bernard J. F. Lonergan defines emergence as the process in which “otherwise coincidental manifolds of lower conjugate acts invite the higher integration effected by higher conjugate forms” (Insight, [1957] 1992, 477). The meaning and implications of Lonergan’s concept of emergence are considered in the context of the problem of reductionism in the natural sciences. Examples are taken primarily from physics, chemistry, and biology.
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  41.  9
    On the Contribution of Sociology to the Physical Sciences.Frank E. Hartung - 1948 - Philosophy of Science 15 (2):109-115.
    What I am going to say here may be thought by some to be more appropriate to science as a whole, rather than “what sociology has to offer to the physical sciences.” The main point of my remarks has to do with objectivity and values in science. Great masses of people are today in doubt as to whether science is a friend or an enemy of theirs. They do not see it as a means to continued material progress, as objectively (...)
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  42.  44
    Operationalism: Idealism or Realism?Frank E. Hartung - 1942 - Philosophy of Science 9 (4):350-355.
    As presented by some, operationalism in sociology is Kantian in its view of the universe, of the assumptions and limitations of science, and of the scientist's ability to analyse and present the reality of the universe.In his exposition, George A. Lundberg rests operationalism upon a twofold basis. First there is a materially-conceived nature. This is expressed in the terms “X,” “the cosmos,” or “that which arouses certain responses.” We do not know, cannot know, nor can science tell us, anything about (...)
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  43.  9
    Operationism as a Cultural Survival.Frank E. Hartung - 1944 - Philosophy of Science 11 (4):227-232.
    Operationism may tentatively be defined as that scientific method which defines its concepts in terms of observable or communicable operations, however carried out. With few exceptions, it has been put forward as representing positivism in contemporary sociology. Sellars refers to it as a new and virulent form of positivism—logical positivism. In philosophy, logical positivism is the culmination of the sensationalism of Berkeley and Hume, the positivism of Mach and Avenarius and Comte, and the logistic of Russell and Wittgenstein. In sociology, (...)
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  44.  20
    Science as an Institution.Frank E. Hartung - 1951 - Philosophy of Science 18 (1):35-54.
    1. Introduction. The purpose of this paper is to present an initial sociological analysis of science as an institution. This kind of analysis has long been made of other aspects of culture: of the family, the state, religion, economic enterprise and the like. An institution, as the term is used here, is simply… a definite and established phase of the public mind … often seeming, on account of its permanence and the visible customs and symbols in which it is clothed, (...)
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  45.  19
    Problems of the Sociology of Knowledge.Frank E. Hartung - 1952 - Philosophy of Science 19 (1):17-32.
    The sociology of knowledge can most generally be defined as the discipline devoted to the social origins of thought. It is an analysis concerned with specifying the existential basis of thought, and with establishing the relationship obtained between mental structures or thought, and that existential basis. Some very interesting and difficult problems arise from this conception of the sociology of knowledge. Perhaps the most obvious of these is whether or not a sociology of knowledge, as here conceived, is theoretically possible. (...)
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  46.  29
    Sociological Foundations of Modern Science.Frank E. Hartung - 1947 - Philosophy of Science 14 (1):68-95.
    This study is an attempt partially to describe the sociological foundations of modern science. When the question is put, under what social circumstances did the idea of science develop, one sees that there is here an inadequately explored sociological area. Perhaps a definition and a contrast will make this clearer. By the idea of science is meant simply the proposition that the valid source of human knowledge is to be found in the analysis of experience. But knowledge in this sense (...)
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  47.  11
    The Social Function of Positivism.Frank E. Hartung - 1945 - Philosophy of Science 12 (2):120-133.
    Positivists since the time of Comte have defined objectivity in science in terms of the absence of prejudice on the part of the scientist towards the phenomena with which he deals. It has been assumed that if the observer would contemplate the facts himself, this objectivity—an absence of bias—could be attained. However, social psychologists, notably C. H. Cooley and G. H. Mead, have shown that this is not necessarily the case. In the study of culture, an outstanding positivist, W. G. (...)
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  48.  23
    A Sociological Evaluation of the Meeting of East and West.Frank E. Hartung - 1950 - Philosophy of Science 17 (3):229-237.
    A major problem of the philosophy of science is the construction of a comprehensive science of man and the universe. The sociology of science has a part to play in this tremendous task by indicating the extra-scientific influences bearing upon science at any given period, assisting, in this way, in developing a self-consciousness of science. It is believed that this self-consciousness is necessary to a scientific appraisal of the method of scientific inquiry, as well as being necessary to any attempt (...)
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  49.  22
    Cultural Relativity and Moral Judgments.Frank E. Hartung - 1954 - Philosophy of Science 21 (2):118-126.
    1. Introduction. Cultural relativity is one of the most important conceptions to which anthropology and sociology have devoted much attention in recent years. It is a theory of human conduct based upon observational studies of different cultures and different societies. Many of the leaders in the various social sciences are currently among the advocates of this viewpoint. The burden of these pages, however, is that cultural relativity is flying under false colors: it claims to be empirical but is illogical; it (...)
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  50.  16
    Pavlovian Perceptions and Primate Realities.Frank E. Poirier & Michelle Field - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (2):262-262.
    The extent to which Pavlovian feed-forward mechanisms operate in primates is debatable. Monkeys and apes are long-lived, usually gregarious, and intelligent animals reliant on learned behavior. Learning occurs during play, mother-infant interactions, and grooming. We address these situations, and are hesitant to accept Domjan et al.'s reliance on Pavlovian conditioning as a major operant in primates.
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