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  1.  39
    Classroom Behaviour Problems Which Junior School Teachers Find Most Troublesome.Frank Merrett & Kevin Wheldall - 1984 - Educational Studies 10 (2):87-92.
  2.  62
    How Do Teachers Learn to Manage Classroom Behaviour? A Study of Teachers' Opinions About Their Initial Training with Special Reference to Classroom Behaviour Management.Frank Merrett & Kevin Wheldall[1] - 1993 - Educational Studies 19 (1):91-106.
    Summary Structured interviews were carried out with 176 secondary school teachers to elicit their views/opinions about their initial professional training and their later practical experience, with particular reference to classroom behaviour management. The results showed that the vast majority of teachers believe classroom management skills to be of major importance to them professionally. Nearly three?quarters of them were dissatisfied with the preparation in this area of professional skills provided by their initial training courses. Many thought that their colleagues spent too (...)
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  3.  11
    The Attitudes of British Secondary School Pupils to Praise and Reward.Peter Sharpe, Kevin Wheldall & Frank Merrett - 1987 - Educational Studies 13 (3):293-302.
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  4.  31
    Rules, Sanctions and Rewards in Primary Schools.Frank Merrett & Linda Jones - 1994 - Educational Studies 20 (3):345-356.
    Summary Twenty?four primary schools were randomly selected from all those listed in a local education authority in the West Midlands of England. Heads or deputy headteachers of 21 of these schools were interviewed using a structured interview schedule very similar to the one used for a recent survey of secondary schools. Data were obtained about the general rule structures of the schools and the system of sanctions and rewards used to maintain them. The findings were then compared with those from (...)
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  5.  24
    How Do Teachers Learn to Manage Classroom Behaviour? A Study of Teachers' Opinions About Their Initial Training with Special Reference to Classroom Behaviour Management.Frank Merrett & Kevin Wheldall - 1993 - Educational Studies 19 (1):91-106.
    Structured interviews were carried out with 176 secondary school teachers to elicit their views/opinions about their initial professional training and their later practical experience, with particular reference to classroom behaviour management. The results showed that the vast majority of teachers believe classroom management skills to be of major importance to them professionally. Nearly three‐quarters of them were dissatisfied with the preparation in this area of professional skills provided by their initial training courses. Many thought that their colleagues spent too much (...)
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  6.  10
    Classroom Management for Project Work: An Application of Correspondence Training.Jonathan Merrett & Frank Merrett - 1992 - Educational Studies 18 (1):3-10.
    Summary This study is a further attempt to apply correspondence training in the classroom in order to improve learning outcomes. Using this strategy a class of middle school pupils was encouraged to show more initiative, independence and self?regulation in planning and carrying out topic work. The pupils were required to forecast what they proposed to achieve in a certain period and then to check up at the end to see how far they had been successful. In addition, upon hearing an (...)
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  7.  7
    Reducing Troublesome Behaviour in Three Secondary Pupils Through Correspondence Training.Ted Glynn, Frank Merrett & Steve Houghton - 1991 - Educational Studies 17 (3):273-283.
    This exploratory study applied Risley & Hart's correspondence training paradigm to reducing the troublesome behaviour of three 12 to 14 year‐old boys in an inner city high school in the West Midlands. Correspondence training involves negotiating individual reductions in levels of two classes of troublesome behaviour, talking out of turn and hindering other children . The boys were also assisted to collect data on their own behaviour in specific lessons. The school's existing system of rewards was utilised to reinforce the (...)
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