13 found
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  1. Empathy: Its Ultimate and Proximate Bases.Stephanie D. Preston & Frans B. M. de Waal - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (1):1-20.
    There is disagreement in the literature about the exact nature of the phenomenon of empathy. There are emotional, cognitive, and conditioning views, applying in varying degrees across species. An adequate description of the ultimate and proximate mechanism can integrate these views. Proximately, the perception of an object's state activates the subject's corresponding representations, which in turn activate somatic and autonomic responses. This mechanism supports basic behaviors that are crucial for the reproductive success of animals living in groups. The Perception-Action Model, (...)
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  2.  75
    Towards a Bottom-Up Perspective on Animal and Human Cognition.Frans B. M. de Waal & Pier Francesco Ferrari - 2010 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 14 (5):201-207.
  3.  78
    Anthropomorphism and Anthropodenial: Consistency in Our Thinking About Humans and Other Animals.Frans B. M. de Waal - 1999 - Philosophical Topics 27 (1):255-280.
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  4.  29
    A Proximate Perspective on Reciprocal Altruism.Sarah F. Brosnan & Frans B. M. de Waal - 2002 - Human Nature 13 (1):129-152.
    The study of reciprocal altruism, or the exchange of goods and services between individuals, requires attention to both evolutionary explanations and proximate mechanisms. Evolutionary explanations have been debated at length, but far less is known about the proximate mechanisms of reciprocity. Our own research has focused on the immediate causes and contingencies underlying services such as food sharing, grooming, and cooperation in brown capuchin monkeys and chimpanzees. Employing both observational and experimental techniques, we have come to distinguish three types of (...)
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  5.  85
    Identifying the Motivations of Chimpanzees: Culture and Collaboration.Victoria Horner, Kristin E. Bonnie & Frans B. M. de Waal - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (5):704-705.
    Tomasello et al. propose that shared intentionality is a uniquely human ability. In light of this, we discuss several cultural behaviors that seem to result from a motivation to share experiences with others, suggest evidence for coordination and collaboration among chimpanzees, and cite recent findings that counter the argument that the predominance of emulation in chimpanzees reflects a deficit in intention reading.
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    Empathy: Each is in the Right – Hopefully, Not All in the Wrong.Stephanie D. Preston & Frans B. M. de Waal - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (1):49-58.
    Only a broad theory that looks across levels of analysis can encompass the many perspectives on the phenomenon of empathy. We address the major points of our commentators by emphasizing that the basic perception-action process, while automatic, is subject to control and modulation, and is greatly affected by experience and context because of the role of representations. The model can explain why empathy seems phenomenologically more effortful than reflexive, and why there are different levels of empathy across individuals, ages, and (...)
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  7.  5
    Evolutionary Ethics, Aggression, and Violence: Lessons From Primate Research.Frans B. M. de Waal - 2004 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 32 (1):18-23.
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  8.  43
    Monkey Business and Business Ethics.Frans B. M. de Waal - 2004 - The Ruffin Series of the Society for Business Ethics 2004:7-41.
    To what degree has biology influenced and shaped the development of moral systems? One way to determine the extent to which human moral systems might be the product of natural selection is to explore behaviour in other species that is analogous and perhaps homologous to our own. Many non-human primates, for example, have similar methods to humans for resolving, managing, and preventing conflicts of interests within their groups. Such methods, which include reciprocity and food sharing, reconciliation, consolation, conflict intervention, and (...)
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  9. Morality and its Relation to Primate Social Instincts.Frans B. M. de Waal - 2010 - In Henrik Høgh-Olesen (ed.), Human Morality and Sociality: Evolutionary and Comparative Perspectives. Palgrave-Macmillan.
     
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  10.  50
    A Cross-Species Perspective on the Selfishness Axiom.Sarah F. Brosnan & Frans B. M. de Waal - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (6):818-818.
    Henrich et al. describe an innovative research program investigating cross-cultural differences in the selfishness axiom (in economic games) in humans, yet humans are not the only species to show such variation. Chimpanzees and capuchin monkeys show signs of deviating from the standard self-interest paradigm in experimental settings by refusing to take foods that are less valuable than those earned by conspecifics, indicating that they, too, may pay attention to relative gains. However, it is less clear whether these species also show (...)
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  11.  16
    No Imitation Without Identification.Frans B. M. de Waal - 1998 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (5):689-689.
    We cannot solve questions about imitative learning without knowing what motivates animals to copy others. Imitative capacities can be expected to be most pronounced in relation to situations and models of great social significance. Experimental research on nonhuman primates has thus far made little effort to present such situations and models.
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    Monkey Business and Business Ethics: Evolution Origins of Human Morality.Jessica C. Flack & Frans B. M. De Waal - 2004 - The Ruffin Series of the Society for Business Ethics 4:7-41.
    To what degree has biology influenced and shaped the development of moral systems? One way to determine the extent to which human moral systems might be the product of natural selection is to explore behaviour in other species that is analogous and perhaps homologous to our own. Many non-human primates, for example, have similar methods to humans for resolving, managing, and preventing conflicts of interests within their groups. Such methods, which include reciprocity and food sharing, reconciliation, consolation, conflict intervention, and (...)
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  13.  4
    Emotional Control.Frans B. M. de Waal - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (2):254-254.