Order:
Disambiguations
Frans L. Roes [4]Frans Roes [1]
  1.  14
    The Curious Case of the Spanish Flu.Frans Roes - 2018 - Biological Theory 13 (4):243-245.
    It is often claimed that the exceptional severity of the Spanish flu, one of the most deadly events in recorded human history, is an unsolved mystery. However, even detailed aspects such as its W-shaped mortality curve are well explained by Paul Ewald’s theory of the evolution of virulence. Understanding the causes of the Spanish flu will help to prevent future epidemics.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  2.  7
    Permanent Group Membership.Frans L. Roes - 2014 - Biological Theory 9 (3):318-324.
    This article is divided into two main sections. The first discusses “Female Inheritance and the Male Retention Hypothesis.” Permanent groups exist in several species because over generations members share important interests. Considering the association between cooperation and degree of relatedness, it seems to follow that a collective interest is more likely to be achieved when members show a higher degree of relatedness. I argue that if membership is inherited by only one sex, and this is the female sex, this results (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  3.  35
    Crying and Tears Mimic the Neonate.Frans L. Roes - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (4):472-472.
    This commentator has no argument with the explanations given by Soltis. Yet a different approach to the phenomenon of crying might be fruitful. Neonates elicit care. It is hypothesized that non-neonates evolved to mimic, when in need, the appearance of the neonate by crying and by shedding tears, thus inducing helping behavior by the spectator.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  1
    Moralizing Gods Revisited.Frans L. Roes - 2016 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 39.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  8
    On the Evolution of Virulent Zoonotic Viruses in Bats.Frans L. Roes - 2020 - Biological Theory 15 (4):223-225.
    Ideas formulated by Paul Ewald about the “evolution of virulence” are used to explain why bats, more often than other mammals, are a reservoir of virulent viruses, and why many of these viruses severely affect other mammals, including humans, but are apparently less pathogenic for bats. Potential factors contributing to bat viruses often being zoonotic are briefly discussed.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark