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  1.  21
    Popper's Social‐Democratic Politics and Free‐Market Liberalism.Fred Eidlin - 2005 - Critical Review 17 (1-2):25-48.
    Abstract Holding unlimited economic freedom to be nearly as dangerous as physical violence, Karl Popper advocated ?piecemeanl? economic intervention by the state. Jeremy Shearmur's recent book on Popper contends that as the philosopher aged, his views grew closer to classical liberalism than those expressed in The Open Society?consistently with what Shearmur sees as the logic of Popper's arguments. But Popper's philosophy, while recognizing that any project aimed at bringing about social change must be immensely complex and fraught with difficulty, retains (...)
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  2.  22
    Blindspot of a Liberal Popper and the Problem of Community.Fred Eidlin - 1997 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 27 (1):5-23.
    Popper's critique of the philosophical doctrines underlying totalitarian ideology is powerful. Yet, having the regimes of Hitler and Stalin in full view before him, he did not give full and balanced consideration to the range of effects these doctrines can have within actually existing ideologies and regimes. The ideas he correlates with totalitarianism can and do exist in benign forms or tempered by other ideas and by institutions. Moreover, the struggle with totalitarianism is only partly a struggle of philosophical ideas. (...)
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  3.  40
    Plato and K. R. Popper: Toward a Critique of Plato's Political Philosophy.Anastasios Giannaras & Fred Eidlin - 1996 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 26 (4):493-508.
  4.  27
    Karl Popper, 1902–1994: Radical Fallibilism, Political Theory, and Democracy.Fred Eidlin - 1996 - Critical Review 10 (1):135-153.
    Abstract Popper's philosophy of science represents a radical departure from almost all other views about knowledge. This helps account for serious misunderstandings of it among admirers no less than among adversaries. The view that knowledge has and needs no foundations is counterintuitive and apparently relativistic. But Popper's fallibilism is in fact a far cry from anti?realism. Similarly, Popper's social and political philosophy, although seemingly conservative in practice, can be quite radical in theory. And while Popper was an ardent democrat, his (...)
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  5. Matching Popperian Theory to Practice.Fred Eidlin - 1999 - In I. C. Jarvie & Sandra Pralong (eds.), Popper's Open Society After Fifty Years: The Continuing Relevance of Karl Popper. Routledge.
  6.  18
    Refereeing in 1996.Avishalom Adam, Brian Baigrie, Alf Bång, H. I. Brown, K. O. L. Burridge, Ferrell Christenson, Richard Collins, Wesley Cragg, Jane Duran & Fred Eidlin - 1999 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 29 (1):160-161.
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  7. To Practice.Fred Eidlin - 1999 - In I. C. Jarvie & Sandra Pralong (eds.), Popper's Open Society After Fifty Years: The Continuing Relevance of Karl Popper. Routledge. pp. 203.
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