17 found
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Fred R. Berger [17]Fred Robert Berger [1]
  1. Gratitude.Fred R. Berger - 1975 - Ethics 85 (4):298-309.
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  2. Happiness, Justice and Freedom: The Moral & Political Philosophy of John Stuart Mill.Fred R. Berger - 1986 - Noûs 20 (1):81-83.
  3. Pornography, Sex, and Censorship.Fred R. Berger - 1977 - Social Theory and Practice 4 (2):183-209.
  4.  10
    Studying Deductive Logic.Fred R. Berger - 1977 - Englewood Cliffs, NJ, USA: Prentice-Hall.
  5.  8
    Books in Review.Fred R. Berger - 1984 - Political Theory 12 (4):615-619.
  6.  39
    Excuses and the law.Fred R. Berger - 1965 - Theoria 31 (1):9-19.
  7.  11
    Happiness, Justice, and Freedom: The Moral and Political Philosophy of John Stuart Mill.Fred R. Berger - 1984 - University of California Press.
    This title is part of UC Press's Voices Revived program, which commemorates University of California Press’s mission to seek out and cultivate the brightest minds and give them voice, reach, and impact. Drawing on a backlist dating to 1893, Voices Revived makes high-quality, peer-reviewed scholarship accessible once again using print-on-demand technology. This title was originally published in 1984.
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  8. ‘Law and order’ and civil disobedience.Fred R. Berger - 1970 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 13 (1-4):254 – 273.
    Law and order ranks high among the values the State is thought to achieve. Civil disobedience is often condemned because it is held to threaten law and order. Several senses of 'order' are distinguished, which make clear why 'law' and 'order' are so often linked. It is then argued that the connection cannot always be made since the legal system may itself create disorder. Civil disobedience may contribute to greater order and a more stable legal system by helping to remove (...)
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  9.  39
    Mill's Substantive Principles of Justice: A Comparison with Nozick.Fred R. Berger - 1982 - American Philosophical Quarterly 19 (4):373 - 380.
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  10.  12
    Philosophical abstracts.Fred R. Berger - 1982 - American Philosophical Quarterly 19 (3).
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  11.  18
    Paternalism and Autonomy.Fred R. Berger - 1985 - Bowling Green Studies in Applied Philosophy 7:37-52.
  12.  44
    Rest and Motion in the Sophist.Fred R. Berger - 1965 - Phronesis 10 (1):70-77.
  13.  8
    Reply to professor Skorupski.Fred R. Berger - 1985 - Philosophical Books 26 (4):202-207.
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  14.  45
    The Right of Free Expression.Fred R. Berger - 1986 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 3 (2):1-10.
  15.  45
    On an argument for the impossibility of prediction in the social sciences.Margaret P. Gilbert & Fred R. Berger - manuscript
    This paper criticises a line of argument adopted by peter winch, Karl popper, And others, To the effect that the course of human history cannot be predicted. On this view it is impossible to predict in a particularly detailed way certain events ('original acts') on which important social developments depend. We analyze the argument, Showing that one version fails: original acts are in principle predictable in the relevant way. A cogent version is presented; this requires a special definition for 'original (...)
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  16.  5
    John Stuart Mill and Representative Government. [REVIEW]Fred R. Berger - 1978 - Philosophical Review 87 (2):322-325.
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  17.  18
    Morality and Language. [REVIEW]Fred R. Berger - 1985 - Review of Metaphysics 38 (4):916-917.
    The essays collected in this volume lack the sort of unifying theme or subject matter that the book's title implies. It is not that the wrong name was chosen, but that the essays are too disparate for an accurate summarizing title. If, then, we do not have gathered here the development of a set of themes that run throughout the essays, what justifies the collection, and why should anyone read the book? I believe there are good answers to these questions.
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