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Fred Wilson [173]Frederick J. Linford Wilson [4]Fred Forster Wilson [1]
  1.  84
    On Hume’s Theory of Consciousness.Fred Wilson - 1995 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 18 (1):271-276.
    Waxman has reversed the historical process and gone from Kant to Hume. In his previous book on Kant, Kant's Model of the Mind, it was pointed out that Hume's philosophy seemed to come to grief with the failure to account for the identity of the self, and this in turn was a consequence of Hume's inability to account for how the imagination is able to yield a consciousness of succession. There seemed no way to obtain either the unity, spatial and (...)
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  2. The External World and Our Knowledge of It: Hume's Critical Realism, an Exposition and a Defence.Fred Wilson (ed.) - 2008 - University of Toronto Press.
  3.  10
    The Anatomy of Historical Knowledge.Fred Wilson - 1977 - Philosophical Review 88 (4):663-668.
  4.  20
    John Stuart Mill.Fred Wilson - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  5.  34
    Hume’s Defence of Causal Inference.Fred Wilson - 1983 - Dialogue 22 (4):661-694.
  6. Psychological Analysis and the Philosophy of John Stuart Mill.Fred Wilson - 1990
     
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  7.  41
    Galileo's Lunar Observations: Do They Imply the Rejection of Traditional Lunar Theory?Fred Wilson - 2001 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 32 (3):557-570.
  8.  37
    Hume on the Abstract Idea of Existence: Comments on Cummins' "Hume on the Idea of Existence".Fred Wilson - 1991 - Hume Studies 17 (2):167-201.
  9.  50
    Empiricism and the Epistemology of Instruments.Fred Wilson - 1995 - The Monist 78 (2):207-229.
    There are scientific theories that can be tested only through the use of instruments. Thus, we use, for example, instruments such as microscopes, telescopes, Wilson cloud chambers, and so on, to test theories. This use of instruments in science has been pointed out often by philosophers of science, who then correctly draw the conclusion that what is tested is not so much a single theory T but rather a conjunction.
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  10.  24
    Hume's Sceptical Argument Against Reason.Fred Wilson - 1983 - Hume Studies 9 (2):90-129.
  11.  59
    The Logic of Probabilities in Hume's Argument Against Miracles.Fred Wilson - 1989 - Hume Studies 15 (2):255-275.
  12.  10
    The Concept of Physical Law.Fred Wilson - 1987 - Philosophy of Science 54 (1):130-132.
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  13.  58
    Marras on Sellars on Thought and Language.Fred Wilson - 1975 - Philosophical Studies 28 (August):91-102.
  14.  30
    Is Hume a Sceptic with Regard to the Senses?Fred Wilson - 1989 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 27 (1):49-73.
  15.  33
    Challengeability in Modern Science. J. O. Wisdom.Fred Wilson - 1990 - Philosophy of Science 57 (1):169-170.
  16. Mill on Psychology and the Moral Sciences.Fred Wilson - 1998 - In John Skorupski (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Mill. Cambridge University Press. pp. 203--54.
     
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  17.  66
    Mill's Proof That Happiness is the Criterion of Morality.Fred Wilson - 1982 - Journal of Business Ethics 1 (1):59 - 72.
    This paper considers the converse of the principle that ought implies can, namely, the principle that must implies ought. It argues that this principle is the central premiss for Mill's argument that happiness is desirable (worthy of desire), and it examines the sense of must that is relevant and the implications it has for Mill's moral philosophy.
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  18.  6
    Carnap and Goodman: Two Formalists.Alan Hausman & Fred Wilson - 1969 - Philosophy of Science 36 (3):327-330.
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  19. Empiricism and Darwin's Science.Fred Wilson - 1991 - Kluwer Academic Publishers.
  20.  48
    Hume and the Role of Testimony in Knowledge.Fred Wilson - 2010 - Episteme 7 (1):58-78.
    It has been argued that Hume's account of testimony is seriously inadequate: an autonomous knower of the sort Hume defends cannot, through simple inductive methods, justify accepting another's testimony as true. This conclusion is no doubt correct. But Hume does not defend the idea of an autonomous knower, nor does he defend relying upon simple inductive methods. An examination of Hume's critique of Descartes’ method of doubt shows him as a defender of what might be called the responsible knower, and (...)
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  21.  42
    Bradley’s Critique of Associationism.Fred Wilson - 1998 - Bradley Studies 4 (1):5-60.
    F. H. Bradley, while not alone in securing idealism its standing in British thought for several generations of philosophers, was by far the ablest exponent of the position. He was by far the ablest critic, too, of the “school of experience,” the empiricist philosophers. In particular, he criticized the doctrines of the associationist psychology of Hume, Hartley, and the Mills. This criticism was metaphysically based, arguing that the psychology was inadequate because of its “atomism,” that is, because it presupposed an (...)
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  22.  17
    Acquaintance, Ontology, and Knowledge.Fred Wilson - 1970 - New Scholasticism 44 (1):1-48.
  23.  6
    Explanation, Causation and Deduction.Fred Wilson - 1987 - Philosophy of Science 54 (2):311-313.
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  24. Definition and Discovery (I).Fred Wilson - 1967 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 18 (4):43-56.
  25.  24
    Metaphysical Analysis. J. W. Yolton.Fred Wilson - 1970 - Philosophy of Science 37 (3):455-458.
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  26.  26
    Bradley’s Conception of Ideality: Comments on Ferreira’s Defence.Fred Wilson - 1995 - Bradley Studies 1 (2):139-152.
    Ferreira outlines Bradley’s account of judgment and perception, and then, towards the end of his essay, indicates the sort of reason that Bradley takes to be an argument in favour of his views. I want to look at that argument, but will first summarize Ferreira’s account of Bradley’s views. This account seems to me to make a very important point about the role of feeling in Bradley’s philosophy, specifically that feeling in Bradley’s ontology/epistemology has a very different status and role (...)
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  27.  35
    The Role of a Principle of Acquaintance in Ontology.Fred Wilson - 1969 - Modern Schoolman 47 (1):37-56.
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  28.  34
    The Significance for Psychology of Bradley’s Humean View of the Self.Fred Wilson - 1999 - Bradley Studies 5 (1):5-44.
    James Mark Baldwin was one of the leaders in the new experimental psychology that developed at the end of the 19th century. In a discussion of F. H. Bradley’s view of the self, he makes an apparently odd remark. Baldwin describes Bradley’s account of the active self, the self of volition and desire. In particular, he refers to Bradley’s account of the feeling of self activity. On the latter, certain contents defining the ‘I’ remain constant, while there is change in (...)
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  29. Laws and Other Worlds. A Humean Account of Laws and Counterfactuals.Fred Wilson - 1989 - Studia Logica 48 (2):261-262.
  30.  9
    The Origins of Hume's Sceptical Argument Against Reason.Fred Wilson - 1985 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 2 (3):323 - 335.
  31.  49
    Hume and Derrida on Language and Meaning.Fred Wilson - 1986 - Hume Studies 12 (2):99-121.
  32.  25
    Hume's Defence of Science.Fred Wilson - 1986 - Dialogue 25 (4):611.
  33.  30
    Kuhn and Goodman: Revolutionary Vs. Conservative Science. [REVIEW]Fred Wilson - 1983 - Philosophical Studies 44 (3):369 - 380.
  34.  20
    Nominalistic Systems. Rolf A. Eberle.Fred Wilson - 1972 - Philosophy of Science 39 (4):556-558.
  35.  9
    A Note on Operationism.Fred Wilson - 1968 - Critica 2 (4):79-87.
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  36.  12
    Dispositions: Defined or Reduced?Fred Wilson - 1969 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 47 (2):184 – 204.
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  37.  29
    Burgersdijck, Bradley, Russell, Bergmann: Four Philosophers on the Ontology of Relations.Fred Wilson - 1995 - Modern Schoolman 72 (4):283-310.
  38.  47
    Mill's 'Proof' of Utility and the Composition of Causes.Fred Wilson - 1983 - Journal of Business Ethics 2 (2):135 - 155.
    John Stuart Mill proposed that all policy precepts, be they in the areas of morality or prudence or aesthetics, are all subordinate to the precepts of the Art of Life. The value which he assumes in defining the Art of Life is the Principle of Utility. This principle, being normative rather than fact, can admit of no proof based solely on deductive inference. Yet Mill proposed considerations that he believed capable of rationally persuading one to accept his principle as the (...)
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  39.  34
    Is Hume a Sceptic with Regard to Reason?Fred Wilson - 1984 - Philosophy Research Archives 10:275-319.
    This paper argues that, contrary to most interpretations, e.g., those of Reid, Popkin and Passmore, Hume is not a sceptic with regard to reason. The argument of Treatise I, IV. i, of course, has a sceptical conclusion with regard to reason, and a somewhat similar point is made by Cleanthes in the Dialogues. This paper argues that the argument of Treatise I, IV. i is parallel to similar arguments in Bentham and Laplace. The latter are, as far as they go, (...)
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  40.  15
    Weinberg's Refutation of Nominalism.Fred Wilson - 1969 - Dialogue 8 (3):460-474.
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  41.  8
    Effability, Ontology, and Method.Fred Wilson - 1983 - Philosophy Research Archives 9:419-469.
    Bergmann has proposed an ontology that contains an entity many find strange: particularity. And in fact, Bergmann, too, seems to find it strange. He proposes a phenomenological method in ontology, and holds, as he therefore should, that particularity is presented. Nonetheless, he also holds that it is ineffable, that its presence in a particular is an unsayable state of affairs, and that it is something which is not a thing and yet is also not nothing. Bergmann’s position has been long (...)
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  42.  3
    Notes.Fred Wilson - 2008 - In The External World and Our Knowledge of It: Hume's Critical Realism, an Exposition and a Defence. University of Toronto Press. pp. 693-770.
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  43.  10
    Is There a Prussian Hume? Or How Far Is It From Könisberg to Edinburgh?Fred Wilson - 1982 - Hume Studies 8 (1):1-18.
  44.  62
    Exemplification, Then and Now.Fred Wilson - 2013 - Axiomathes 23 (2):269-289.
    Exemplification can be found in ontologies from the ancient world, such as those of Plato and Aristotle, and more recent ontologies, in particular those that take what exists to be determined by the empiricist’s Principle of Acquaintance. This study examines some of the ways in which exemplification takes different forms in these different ontologies. Exemplification has also been criticized as an ontological category. This paper examines a number of these criticisms, to see the extent to which they are viable.
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  45.  54
    Explanation in Aristotle, Newton, and Toulmin: Part I.Fred Wilson - 1969 - Philosophy of Science 36 (3):291-310.
    The claim that scientific explanation is deductive has been attacked on both systematic and historical grounds. This paper briefly defends the claim against the systematic attack. Essential to this defence is a distinction between perfect and imperfect explanation. This distinction is then used to illuminate the differences and similarities between Aristotelian (anthropomorphic) explanations of certain facts and those of classical mechanics. In particular, it is argued that when one attempts to fit classical mechanics into the Aristotelian framework the latter becomes (...)
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  46. Methods and Systematic Reflections, Postmodern Reflections on Death.George Kovacs, Judith A. Boss & Fred Wilson - 2002 - Ultimate Reality and Meaning 25 (3):203-213.
     
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  47. Introduction.Fred Wilson - 2008 - In The External World and Our Knowledge of It: Hume's Critical Realism, an Exposition and a Defence. University of Toronto Press. pp. 1-20.
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  48.  17
    I. Addis on Analysing Disposition Concepts.Fred Wilson - 1985 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 28 (1-4):247-260.
    Addis (1981) has criticized a proposal of ours (Wilson [1969b]) for analysing disposition predications in terns of the horseshoe of material implication, and has proposed a related but significantly different analysis. This paper restates the original proposal, and defends it against Addis's criticisms. It is further argued that his proposal will not do as a general account of disposition predications; that, however, if it is suitably qualified, then it does account for certain special sorts of disposition predication; but that so (...)
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  49. On the Hausmans' 'A New Approach'.Fred Wilson - 1995 - In Robert G. Muehlmann (ed.), Berkeley's Metaphysics: Structural, Interpretive, and Critical Essays. The Pennsylvania State University Press.
  50. The Logic and Methodology of Science in Early Modern Thought: Seven Studies.Fred Wilson - 1999 - University of Toronto Press.
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