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Frederick Bird [15]Frederick B. Bird [4]Frederick G. Bird [1]
  1.  33
    The Muted Conscience: Moral Silence and the Practice of Ethics in Business.Frederick B. Bird - 1996 - Quorum Books.
    A new approach to understanding the nature of ethics and ethical decision making, not only in the context of business, but also in other life contexts.
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  2.  46
    Everyday Moral Issues Experienced by Managers.James A. Waters, Frederick Bird & Peter D. Chant - 1986 - Journal of Business Ethics 5 (5):373 - 384.
    Based on the results of open ended interviews with managers in a variety of organizational positions, moral questions encountered in everyday managerial life are described. These involve transactions with employees, peers and superiors, customers, suppliers and other stakeholders. It is suggested that managers identify transactions as involving personal moral concern when they believe that a moral standard has a bearing on the situation and when they experience themselves as having the power to affect the transaction. This is the first in (...)
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  3.  89
    The Moral Dimension of Organizational Culture.James A. Waters & Frederick Bird - 1987 - Journal of Business Ethics 6 (1):15 - 22.
    The lack of concrete guidance provided by managerial moral standards and the ambiguity of the expectations they create are discussed in terms of the moral stress experienced by many managers. It is argued that requisite clarity and feelings of obligation with respect to moral standards derive ultimately from public discussion of moral issues within organizations and from shared public agreement about appropriate behavior. Suggestions are made about ways in which the moral dimension of an organization's culture can be more effectively (...)
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  4.  48
    The Social Responsibilities of International Business Firms in Developing Areas.Frederick Bird & Joseph Smucker - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 73 (1):1-9.
    Three principles must be taken into account in assessing the social responsibilities of international business firms in developing areas. The first is an awareness of the historical and institutional dynamics of local communities. This influences the type and range of responsibilities the firm can be expected to assume; it also reveals the limitations of any universal codes of conduct. The second is the necessity of non-intimidating communication with local constituencies. This requires the firm to temper its power and influence by (...)
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  5.  37
    The Nature of Managerial Moral Standards.Frederick Bird & James A. Waters - 1987 - Journal of Business Ethics 6 (1):1 - 13.
    Descriptions of how managers think about the moral questions that come up in their work lives are analyzed to draw out the moral assumptions to which they commonly refer. The moral standards thus derived are identified as (1) honesty in communication, (2) fair treatment, (3) special consideration, (4) fair competition, (5) organizational responsibility, (6) corporate social responsibility, and, (7) respect for law. It is observed that these normative standards assume the cultural form of social conventions but because managers invoke them (...)
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  6.  31
    The Ethics of Empowerment.Jeffrey Gandz & Frederick G. Bird - 1996 - Journal of Business Ethics 15 (4):383 - 392.
    Driven by competitive pressure, organizations are empowering employees to use their judgment, creativity, and ideas in pursuit of enhanced organizational performance and both employee and shareholder satisfaction. This empowerment offers both benefits and potential harm. This article explores the benefits and harm associated with role, reward, process and governance empowerment and makes recommendations for minimizing the harm while maximizing the benefits.
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  7.  22
    The Uses of Moral Talk: Why Do Managers Talk Ethics? [REVIEW]Frederick Bird, Frances Westley & James A. Waters - 1989 - Journal of Business Ethics 8 (1):75 - 89.
    When managers use moral expressions in their communications, they do so for several, sometimes contradictory reasons. Based upon analyses of interviews with managers, this article examines seven distinctive uses of moral talk, sub-divided into three groupings: (1) managers use moral talk functionally to clarify issues, to propose and criticize moral justifications, and to cite relevant norms; (2) managers also use moral talk functionally to praise and to blame as well as to defend and criticize structures of authority; finally (3) managers (...)
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  8.  37
    Attending to Ethics in Management.James A. Waters & Frederick Bird - 1989 - Journal of Business Ethics 8 (6):493 - 497.
    Based on analysis of interviews with managers about the ethical questions they face in their work, a typology of morally questionable managerial acts is developed. The typology distinguishes acts committed against-the-firm (non-role and role-failure acts) from those committed on-behalf-of-the-firm (role-distortion and role-as-sertion acts) and draws attention to the different nature of the four types of acts. The argument is made that senior management attention is typically focused on the types of acts which are least problematical for most managers, and that (...)
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  9.  22
    Project CARE: Placer Dome’s Efforts to Help Laid-Off South African Miners Find Remunerative Work. [REVIEW]Frederick Bird - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 89 (2):183 - 190.
    This essay examines a special program developed by the international Canadian mining firm, Placer Dome, to help recently laid-off workers find remunerative work in southern Africa. Shortly after it bought a 50% interest in the Deep South gold mine in South Africa, the mine laid off nearly 2600 workers. The firm gave redundant miners token serverance pay and offered them opportunity to participate in training and counseling services at the mine site. Overwhelmingly, the miners came from homes all over southern (...)
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  10.  5
    Project CARE: Placer Dome’s Efforts to Help Laid-Off South African Miners Find Remunerative Work.Frederick Bird - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 89 (S2):183-190.
    This essay examines a special program developed by the international Canadian mining firm, Placer Dome, to help recently laid-off workers find remunerative work in southern Africa. Shortly after it bought a 50% interest in the Deep South gold mine in South Africa, the mine laid off nearly 2600 workers. The firm gave redundant miners token serverance pay and offered them opportunity to participate in training and counseling services at the mine site. Overwhelmingly, the miners came from homes all over southern (...)
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  11.  48
    Fairness in International Trade and Investment: North American Perspectives. [REVIEW]Frederick Bird, Thomas Vance & Peter Woolstencroft - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 84 (S3):405 - 425.
    This article reviews the practices and differing sets of attitudes North Americans have taken with respect to fairness in international trade and proposes a set of common considerations for ongoing debates about these matters. After reviewing the asymmetrical relations between Canada, the United States, and Mexico and the impact of multilateral trade agreements on bilateral trade between these countries, the article looks at four typical normative views with respect to trade held by North Americans. These views variously emphasize concerns for (...)
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  12.  33
    Why the Responsible Practice of Business Ethics Calls for a Due Regard for History.Frederick Bird - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 89 (S2):203 - 220.
    Typically people make ethical judgments with reference to unchanging principles, standards, rights, and values. This essay argues that such an ahistorical approach to ethics should be supplemented by a due regard for history. Invoking precedents by authors such as Jonsen and Toulmin, McIntyre, Niebuhr, Weber, De Tocqueville, Machiavelli and others, this essay explores several important ways in which a due regard for history can and should shape the practice of business ethics. Thus a due regard for history helps us both (...)
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  13.  24
    Introduction: International Business Firms, Economic Development, and Ethics.Frederick Bird, Joseph Smucker & Manuel Velasquez - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 89 (S2):81 - 84.
    In 1978, 16 months after Mao Zedong’s death, China’s new leader, Deng Xiaoping, introduced market reforms and an “opening” to the West that allowed the US company Hewlett-Packard to enter China in 1981. Shortly thereafter, HP began a partnership with the Chinese company Legend Computer, through which HP transferred its technology in four main areas: product technology, business model, management practices, and strategic planning processes. This technology transfer seems to be a “just exchange” in that HP received access to China’s (...)
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  14. International Dimensions of Executive Integrity.Nancy J. Adler & Frederick B. Bird - 1988 - In Suresh Srivastva (ed.), Executive Integrity: The Search for High Human Values in Organizational Life. Jossey-Bass.
     
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  15. Good Conversations: A Practical Role for Ethics in Business.Frederick B. Bird & Jeffrey Gandz - forthcoming - The Role of “Good Conversation” in Business Ethics, Beaton (Boston College).
     
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  16.  78
    The Ethical Responsibilities of Businesses in Developing Areas.Frederick Bird - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 89 (S2):85 - 97.
    This article reviews the responsibilities of businesses in relation to the ongoing debates with respect to ethical issues related to economic development. The article addresses four questions: (1) What are the most appropriate ways of thinking about economic development and its relation to human development? (2) What policies are most likely to foster fitting forms of development? (3) What are the best ways of managing the inevitable social disruptions that accompany economic development? And (4) what roles should governments play in (...)
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  17.  9
    The Practice of Mining and Inclusive Wealth Development in Developing Countries.Frederick Bird - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 135 (4):631-643.
    This paper is based upon a review of studies of mining companies, most of them being Canadian, in Chile, northern Canada, Tanzania, Guatemala, Ghana, Sierra Leone and the Democratic Republic of Congo. In spite of often well-meaning efforts, the wealth produced by most mining firms in developing areas largely benefits those immediately involved, sometimes neighbouring communities, and often those in the governing strata. Typically, mining takes place in enclaves and fosters enclave development rather than the kind of inclusive wealth development (...)
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  18.  5
    Weber, Max.Frederick Bird - 2013 - In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.