Results for 'Frowe Helen'

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  1. The Ethics of War and Peace: An Introduction.Helen Frowe - 2011 - Routledge.
    The Ethics of War and Peace is a lively introduction to one of the oldest but still most relevant ethical debates. Focusing on the philosophical questions surrounding the ethics of modern war, Helen Frowe presents contemporary just war theory in a stimulating and accessible way. This 2nd edition includes new material on weapons and technology, and humanitarian intervention, in addition to: theories of self-defence and national defence jus ad bellum, jus in bello and jus post bellum the moral (...)
     
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  2.  54
    Defensive Killing.Helen Frowe - 2014 - Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
    Most people believe that it is sometimes morally permissible for a person to use force to defend herself or others against harm. In Defensive Killing, Helen Frowe offers a detailed exploration of when and why the use of such force is permissible. She begins by considering the use of force between individuals, investigating both the circumstances under which an attacker forfeits her right not to be harmed, and the distinct question of when it is all-things-considered permissible to use (...)
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  3.  43
    Lesser-Evil Justifications for Harming: Why We’Re Required to Turn the Trolley.Helen Frowe - 2018 - Philosophical Quarterly 68 (272):460-480.
    Much philosophical attention has been paid to the question of whether, and why, one may divert a runaway trolley away from where it will kill five people to where it will kill one. But little attention has been paid to whether the reasons that ground a permission to divert thereby ground a duty to divert. This paper defends the Requirement Thesis, which holds that one is, ordinarily, required to act on lesser-evil justifications for harming for the sake of others. Cases (...)
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  4. A Practical Account of Self-Defence.Helen Frowe - 2010 - Law and Philosophy 29 (3):245-272.
    I argue that any successful account of permissible self- defence must be action-guiding, or practical . It must be able to inform people’s deliberation about what they are permitted to do when faced with an apparent threat to their lives. I argue that this forces us to accept that a person can be permitted to use self-defence against Apparent Threats: characters whom a person reasonably, but mistakenly, believes threaten her life. I defend a hybrid account of self-defence that prioritises an (...)
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  5. Equating Innocent Threats and Bystanders.Helen Frowe - 2008 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 25 (4):277-290.
    abstract Michael Otsuka claims that it is impermissible to kill innocent threats because doing so is morally equivalent to killing bystanders. I show that Otsuka's argument conflates killing as a means with treating a person herself as a means. The killing of a person can be a means only if that person is instrumental in the threat to Victim's life. A permission to kill a person as a means will not permit killing bystanders. I also defend a permission to kill (...)
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  6.  84
    Threats, Bystanders and Obstructors.Helen Frowe - 2008 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 108 (1pt3):365-372.
    In this paper I argue that the widespread view that obstructors are a special sort of bystander is mistaken. Obstructors make Victim worse off by their presence, and thus are more properly described as innocent threats. Only those characters who do not make Victim worse off by their presence can be classified as bystanders.
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  7.  41
    The Justified Infliction of Unjust Harm.Helen Frowe - 2009 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 109 (1pt3):345 - 351.
  8.  85
    Self-Defence and the Principle of Non-Combatant Immunity.Helen Frowe - 2011 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 8 (4):530-546.
    The reductivist view of war holds that the moral rules of killing in war can be reduced to the moral rules that govern killing between individuals. Noam Zohar objects to reductivism on the grounds that the account of individual self-defence that best supports the rules of war will inadvertently sanction terrorist killings of non-combatants. I argue that even an extended account of self-defence—that is, an account that permits killing at least some innocent people to save one's own life—can support a (...)
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  9.  33
    How We Fight: Ethics in War.Helen Frowe & Gerald Lang (eds.) - 2014 - Oxford University Press.
    How We Fight: Ethics in War contains ten groundbreaking essays by some of the leading philosophers of war. The essays offer new perspectives on key debates including pacifism, punitive justifications for war, the distribution of risk between combatants and non-combatants, the structure of 'just war theory', and bases of individual liability in war.
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  10.  20
    Non-Combatant Liability in War.Helen Frowe - 2014 - In How We Fight: Ethics in War. Oxford, UK:
    The principle of non-combatant immunity holds that it is impermissible to intentionally target non-combatants in war, even if they belong to the ‘unjust side’ of a war. This principle is traditionally defended by the claim that non-combatants are materially innocent: that, unlike combatants, non-combatants do not threaten. But this view is prima facie implausible. Non-combatants often contribute to their country’s war effort. More recent defences of the PNI therefore seek to show that a non-combatant is not liable to be killed (...)
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  11. Killing John to Save Mary: A Defence of the Distinction Between Killing and Letting Die.Helen Frowe - 2013 - In J. Campbell, M. O’Rourke & H. Silverstein (eds.), Action, Ethics and Responsibility. MIT Press.
    Introduction This paper defends the moral significance of the distinction between killing and letting die. In the first part of the paper, I consider and reject Michael Tooley’s argument that initiating a causal process is morally equivalent to refraining from interfering in that process. The second part disputes Tooley’s suggestion it is merely external factors that make killing appear to be worse than letting die, when in reality the distinction is morally neutral. Tooley is mistaken to claim that we are (...)
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  12.  4
    Symposium on Seth Lazar’s Sparing Civilians : Introduction.Helen Frowe - 2018 - Law and Philosophy 37 (3):229-241.
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  13.  81
    Civilian Immunity in War • by Igor Primoratz, Ed.Helen Frowe - 2009 - Analysis 69 (2):394-395.
    This collection of essays is presented as offering the first real philosophical and legal treatment of the Principle of Non-Combatant Immunity . Primoratz's own essay serves as a useful summary of some of the most influential attempts to rule in all, but only, combatants as legitimate military targets. However, this will feel like very familiar territory to those already working in Just War Theory, as will Uwe Steinhoff's essay, which surveys the same positions . Several of the essays are expositional (...)
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  14.  46
    Review of Larry May (Ed.), War: Essays in Political Philosophy_. [REVIEW]Helen Frowe - 2008 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (11).
  15.  15
    II—Claim Rights, Duties, and Lesser-Evil Justifications.Helen Frowe - 2015 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 89 (1):267-285.
    This paper explores the relationship between a person's claim right not to be harmed and the duties this claim confers on others. I argue that we should reject Jonathan Quong's evidence-based account of this relationship, which holds that an agent A's possession of a claim against B is partly determined by whether it would be reasonable for A to demand B's compliance with a correlative duty. When B's evidence is that demanding compliance would not be reasonable, A cannot have a (...)
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  16.  11
    Killing the Innocent in Self-Defence.Helen Frowe - unknown
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  17.  7
    Jeff McMahan, Killing In War. [REVIEW]Helen Frowe - 2013 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 10 (1):112-115.
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  18.  2
    Review: Deen K. Chatterjee, Ed., The Ethics of Preventive War. [REVIEW]Helen Frowe - 2015 - Ethics 126 (1):215-220.
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  19.  1
    Chatterjee, Deen K., Ed. The Ethics of Preventive War.Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013. Pp. 280. $104.99 ; $29.99. [REVIEW]Helen Frowe - 2015 - Ethics 126 (1):215-220.
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  20. Defending Defensive Killing: Reply to Barry, McMahan, Ferzan, Renzo and Haque.Helen Frowe - forthcoming - Journal of Moral Philosophy.
    This article responds to objections to the account of permissible harming developed in Defensive Killing, as raised by Christian Barry, Jeff McMahan, Kimberly Ferzan, Massimo Renzo and Adil Haque. Each paper deserves much more attention than I can give it here. I focus on Barry’s important observations regarding the liability to defensive harm of those who fail to rescue. In response to McMahan, I grant some of McMahan’s objections to my rejection of the moral equivalence of threats and bystanders, but (...)
     
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  21. If You'll Be My Bodyguard: Agreements to Save and the Duty to Minimise Harm.Helen Frowe - forthcoming - Ethics.
    This article explores how agreements to preferentially save can ground an exception to the duty to minimize harm when saving. A rescuer preferentially saves if she knowingly fails to minimize harm among prospective victims, even though minimizing harm would not have imposed greater costs on the rescuer herself. Allowing rescuers to act on agreements to preferentially save is justified by the reasons we have to respect the agreements that agents form as a means of pursuing their own ends.
     
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  22. On the Redundancy of Jus Ad Vim: A Response to Daniel Brunstetter and Megan Braun.Helen Frowe - 2016 - Ethics and International Affairs 30 (1):117 - 129.
     
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  23. The Ethics of War and Peace.Helen Frowe - 2015 - New Abington: Routledge.
     
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  24. Introduction.Gerald Lang & Helen Frowe - 2014 - In Helen Frowe & Gerald Lang (eds.), How We Fight: Ethics in War. Oxford University Press.
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  25. The Oxford Handbook of Ethics and War.Frowe Helen & Seth Lazar - 2018 - Oxford University Press.
     
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  26. Helen Frowe’s “Practical Account of Self-Defence”: A Critique.Uwe Steinhoff - 2013 - Public Reason 5 (1):87-96.
    Helen Frowe has recently offered what she calls a “practical” account of self-defense. Her account is supposed to be practical by being subjectivist about permissibility and objectivist about liability. I shall argue here that Frowe first makes up a problem that does not exist and then fails to solve it. To wit, her claim that objectivist accounts of permissibility cannot be action-guiding is wrong; and her own account of permissibility actually retains an objectivist (in the relevant sense) (...)
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    On Your Head Be It Sworn: Oath and Virtue in Euripides'Helen.C. A. Helen - 2009 - Classical Quarterly 59:1-7.
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  28.  27
    Defensive Killing, by Frowe, Helen[REVIEW]Saba Bazargan - 2016 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 94 (3):608-611.
  29.  3
    Frowe, Helen. Defensive Killing.Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014. Pp. Xii+227. $50.00.Jeff McMahan - 2016 - Ethics 126 (3):825-831.
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  30.  3
    Jus Ad Vim: A Rejoinder to Helen Frowe.Brunstetter Daniel - 2016 - Ethics and International Affairs 30 (1):131-136.
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  31.  17
    How We Fight By Helen Frowe and Gerald LangTorture and Moral Integrity By Matthew H. Kramer.Jovana Davidovic - 2016 - Analysis 76 (2):259-263.
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  32.  2
    Defensive Killing, Written by Helen Frowe.Henry Phipps - 2018 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 15 (2):237-240.
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  33.  17
    Helen Frowe. The Ethics of War and Peace: An Introduction (Abingdon: Routledge, 2011), 244 Pp. ISBN: 9780415492409 (Pbk.). Hardback/Paperback: £70.00/17.99. [REVIEW]Jonathan Parry - 2013 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 10 (6):789-792.
  34.  8
    Helen Frowe, Defensive Killing.Hadassa Noorda - forthcoming - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-3.
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  35.  3
    Defensive Killing. By Helen Frowe. Pp 227, Oxford University Press, 2014, £30. [REVIEW]Nico Vorster - 2015 - Heythrop Journal 56 (5):904-905.
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  36.  2
    Teoria Contempor'nea da Guerra Justa: uma entrevista com Helen Frowe.Davi Jose de Souza da Silva - 2014 - Ethic@ - An International Journal for Moral Philosophy 13 (2):233-251.
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  37. Justifying Defense Against Non-Responsible Threats and Justified Aggressors: The Liability Vs. The Rights-Infringement Account.Uwe Steinhoff - 2016 - Philosophia 44 (1):247-265.
    Even among those who find lethal defense against non-responsible threats, innocent aggressors, or justified aggressors justified even in one to one cases, there is a debate as to what the best explanation of this permissibility is. The contenders in this debate are the liability account, which holds that the non-responsible or justified human targets of the defensive measures are liable to attack, and the justified infringement account, which claims that the targets retain their right not to be attacked but may (...)
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  38.  28
    Autonomy and the Moral Symmetry Principle: Reply to Frowe and Tooley.Jacob Blair - 2018 - Res Publica 24 (4):531-541.
    Helen Frowe has recently objected to Michael Tooley’s famous Moral Symmetry Principle, which is meant to show that in themselves killing and letting die are morally equivalent. I argue that her objection is not compelling but a more compelling objection is available. Specifically, Tooley’s rebuttal of a proposed counter-example to his Moral Symmetry Principle has two problematic implications. First, it undercuts the very principle itself. If we reject the proposed counter-example, then any instance of the Moral Symmetry Principle (...)
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  39.  45
    Frowe's Machine Cases.Simkulet William - 2015 - Filosofiska Notiser 2 (2): 93-104.
    Helen Frowe (2006/2010) contends that there is a substantial moral difference between killing and letting die, arguing that in Michael Tooley's infamous machine case it is morally wrong to flip a coin to determine who lives or dies. Here I argue that Frowe fails to show that killing and letting die are morally inequivalent. However, I believe that she has succeeded in showing that it is wrong to press the button in Tooley's case, where pressing the button (...)
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  40.  42
    Language and Educational Research.Ian Frowe - 2001 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 35 (2):175–186.
  41.  35
    The Moral Status of Nonresponsible Threats.Jason Hanna - 2012 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 29 (1):19-32.
    Most people believe that it is permissible to kill a nonresponsible threat, or someone who threatens one's life without exercising agency. Defenders of this view must show that there is a morally relevant difference between nonresponsible threats and innocent bystanders. Some philosophers, including Jonathan Quong and Helen Frowe, have attempted to do this by arguing that one who kills a bystander takes advantage of another person, while one who kills a threat does not. In this paper, I show (...)
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  42. How Helen Keller Used Syntactic Semantics to Escape From a Chinese Room.William J. Rapaport - 2006 - Minds and Machines 16 (4):381-436.
    A computer can come to understand natural language the same way Helen Keller did: by using “syntactic semantics”—a theory of how syntax can suffice for semantics, i.e., how semantics for natural language can be provided by means of computational symbol manipulation. This essay considers real-life approximations of Chinese Rooms, focusing on Helen Keller’s experiences growing up deaf and blind, locked in a sort of Chinese Room yet learning how to communicate with the outside world. Using the SNePS computational (...)
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  43.  40
    Material Contribution, Responsibility, and Liability.Christian Barry - forthcoming - Journal of Moral Philosophy.
    In her inventive and tightly argued book Defensive Killing, Helen Frowe defends the view that bystanders—those who do not pose threats to others—cannot be liable to being harmed in self-defence or in defence of others. On her account, harming bystanders always infringes their rights against being harmed, since they have not acted in any way to forfeit them. According to Frowe, harming bystanders can be justified only when it constitutes a lesser evil. In this brief essay, I (...)
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  44.  46
    Bioethics at the Movies.Sandra Shapshay (ed.) - 2009 - Johns Hopkins University Press.
    Bioethics at the Movies explores the ways in which popular films engage basic bioethical concepts and concerns. Twenty philosophically grounded essays use cinematic tools such as character and plot development, scene-setting, and narrative-framing to demonstrate a range of principles and topics in contemporary medical ethics. The first section plumbs popular and bioethical thought on birth, abortion, genetic selection, and personhood through several films, including The Cider House Rules, Citizen Ruth, Gattaca, and I, Robot. In the second section, the contributors examine (...)
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  45.  71
    Helen Keller Was Never in a Chinese Room.Jason Ford - 2011 - Minds and Machines 21 (1):57-72.
    William Rapaport, in “How Helen Keller used syntactic semantics to escape from a Chinese Room,” (Rapaport 2006), argues that Helen Keller was in a sort of Chinese Room, and that her subsequent development of natural language fluency illustrates the flaws in Searle’s famous Chinese Room Argument and provides a method for developing computers that have genuine semantics (and intentionality). I contend that his argument fails. In setting the problem, Rapaport uses his own preferred definitions of semantics and syntax, (...)
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  46.  4
    Against a “Combined Liability-Lesser-Evil Justification”.Uwe Steinhoff - forthcoming - Philosophia:1-21.
    Jeff McMahan has recently proposed what he calls a “combined liability-lesser-evil justification.” Its core idea is that the fact that someone has no right against the infliction of a certain lesser harm makes it easier for the necessity or lesser evil justification to justify inflicting a greater harm on him. This idea has been taken up by authors like Saba Bazargan or Helen Frowe. I will argue that McMahan’s basic idea is implausible to begin with, leads to counter-intuitive (...)
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  47.  2
    Spare No One? A Review Essay.Adam Omar Hosein - forthcoming - Criminal Law and Philosophy:1-17.
    This essay considers some central arguments given by Helen Frowe and Seth Lazar regarding the permissibility of killing civilians in war. It raises some objections to their views and defends some alternative bases for weighing harms to combatants against harms to civilians.
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    Inbreeding, Eugenics, and Helen Dean King (1869-1955).Marilyn Bailey Ogilvie - 2007 - Journal of the History of Biology 40 (3):467 - 507.
    Helen Dean King's scientific work focused on inbreeding using experimental data collected from standardized laboratory rats to elucidate problems in human heredity. The meticulous care with which she carried on her inbreeding experiments assured that her results were dependable and her theoretical explanations credible. By using her nearly homozygous rats as desired commodities, she also was granted access to venues and people otherwise unavailable to her as a woman. King's scientific career was made possible through her life experiences. She (...)
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  49.  26
    Action, Ethics, and Responsibility.Joseph Keim Campbell, Michael O'Rourke & Harry S. Silverstein (eds.) - 2010 - Bradford.
    Most philosophical explorations of responsibility discuss the topic solely in terms of metaphysics and the "free will" problem. By contrast, these essays by leading philosophers view responsibility from a variety of perspectives -- metaphysics, ethics, action theory, and the philosophy of law. After a broad, framing introduction by the volume's editors, the contributors consider such subjects as responsibility as it relates to the "free will" problem; the relation between responsibility and knowledge or ignorance; the relation between causal and moral responsibility; (...)
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  50. Dog-Helen and Homeric Insult.Margaret Graver - 1995 - Classical Antiquity 14 (1):41-61.
    Helen's self-disparagement is an anomaly in epic diction, and this is especially true of those instances where she refers to herself as "dog" and "dog-face." This essay attempts to show that Helen's dog-language, in that it remains in conflict with other features of her characterization, has some generic significance for epic, helping to establish the superiority of epic performance over competing performance types which treated her differently. The metaphoric use of χύων and its derivatives has not been well (...)
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