Results for 'Fundación Banco Bilbao Vizcaya Workshop on International Cooperation for the Human Genome Project'

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  1.  2
    3. Determining Health Care Needs After the Human Genome Project: Reflections on Genetic Tests for Breast Cancer.Susan Sherwin - 2006 - In Susan Sherwin & Peter Schotch (eds.), Engaged Philosophy: Essays in Honour of David Braybrooke. University of Toronto Press. pp. 51-76.
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    Peter T. Coleman, Ph. D. Is the Director of the International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution (ICCCR) at Teachers College, Columbia University, is Associate Professor of Psychology and Education at Teachers College, Columbia University, a Member of the Faculty of Columbia University's Earth Institute, Chair of the International Project on Conflict and Complexity (IPCC). [REVIEW]Michelle Fine - 2011 - In Peter T. Coleman (ed.), Conflict, Interdependence, and Justice. Springer. pp. 11.
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  3.  7
    The Bermuda Triangle: The Pragmatics, Policies, and Principles for Data Sharing in the History of the Human Genome Project.Robert Cook-Deegan, Rachel Ankeny & Kathryn Maxson Jones - 2018 - Journal of the History of Biology 51 (4):693-805.
    The Bermuda Principles for DNA sequence data sharing are an enduring legacy of the Human Genome Project. They were adopted by the HGP at a strategy meeting in Bermuda in February of 1996 and implemented in formal policies by early 1998, mandating daily release of HGP-funded DNA sequences into the public domain. The idea of daily sharing, we argue, emanated directly from strategies for large, goal-directed molecular biology projects first tested within the “community” of C. elegans researchers, (...)
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    The Bermuda Triangle: The Pragmatics, Policies, and Principles for Data Sharing in the History of the Human Genome Project.Kathryn Maxson Jones, Rachel A. Ankeny & Robert Cook-Deegan - 2018 - Journal of the History of Biology 51 (4):693-805.
    The Bermuda Principles for DNA sequence data sharing are an enduring legacy of the Human Genome Project. They were adopted by the HGP at a strategy meeting in Bermuda in February of 1996 and implemented in formal policies by early 1998, mandating daily release of HGP-funded DNA sequences into the public domain. The idea of daily sharing, we argue, emanated directly from strategies for large, goal-directed molecular biology projects first tested within the “community” of C. elegans researchers, (...)
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  5.  24
    Das ELSI-Programm des U.S.-Amerikanischen Humangenomprojekts – Neue Perspektiven Für Die Medizinethik?The ELSI Program of the US-American Human Genome Project – New Perspectives for Medical Ethics?Nikola Biller-Andorno - 2001 - Ethik in der Medizin 13 (4):243-252.
    Definition of the problem: The ELSI (Ethical, Legal, and Social Issues) program of the Human Genome Project is the biggest bioethical research project to date. However, it has met with fairly critical reception. Arguments: ELSI is nevertheless an important element in current bioethics. We can learn not just from the results and methodology of the numerous studies that received ELSI funding, but also by looking at the pros and cons of its close institutional integration into the (...)
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    Scientific Limitations and Ethical Ramifications of a Non-Representative Human Genome Project: African American Response. [REVIEW]Fatimah Jackson - 1998 - Science and Engineering Ethics 4 (2):155-170.
    The Human Genome Project (HGP) represents a massive merging of science and technology in the name of all humanity. While the disease aspects of HGP-generated data have received the greatest publicity and are the strongest rationale for the project, it should be remembered that the HGP has, as its goal the sequencing of all 100,000 human genes and the accurate depiction of the ancestral and functional relationships among these genes. The HGP will thus be constructing (...)
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  7.  13
    The Human Genome Project The Dominance of Economy on Science- Ethical and Social Implications.K. Simitopoulou & N. I. Xirotiris - 2000 - Global Bioethics 13 (3-4):43-52.
    Genetics today have occupied among sciences the privileged role of physics and chemistry of the beginning of this century. This explosive scientific field influences crucially various disciplines, among them life sciences and informatics. Moreover, it imposes “de facto” dramatic changes to our individual and collective life style, thus influencing the whole framework of our civilisation. The intensive involvement of the global economy in the progress of the research and the dissemination of its applications, arises ethical issues to be arranged.The danger (...)
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  8.  5
    Commentary on ‘Moral Reasons to Edit the Human Genome’: This is Not the Moral Imperative We Are Looking For.Sarah Chan - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (8):528-529.
    After reading Savulescu and colleagues,1 one ought to be in no doubt that human heritable genome editing is a ‘moral imperative’: to cure disease, reduce inequalities, improve public health and protect future generations. They make this argument repeatedly and in no uncertain terms. Yet are they right to do so? I am certainly not against developing HGE or exploring its possibilities. Instead, I aim to sound a cautionary note in relation to claims about its technological potential and how (...)
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  9.  50
    The Ethical Implications of the Human Genome Project for the Workplace.Teresa Brady - 1995 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 10 (1):47-56.
  10.  4
    The Human Genome Project in the United States: A Perspective on the Commercial, Ethical, Legislative and Health Care Issues.Bruce F. Mackler & Micha Barach - 1990 - Journal International de Bioethique= International Journal of Bioethics 2 (3):149-157.
  11.  30
    Assessing the Human Genome Project: Effects on World Agriculture. [REVIEW]M. S. Lesney & V. B. Smocovitis - 1994 - Agriculture and Human Values 11 (1):10-18.
    The Human Genome Project is the attempt to sequence the complement of human DNA. Its ultimate purpose is to understand and control human genetics. The social and ethical concerns raised by this attempt have been much debated, especially fears concerning human genetic engineering and eugenics. An almost completely neglected aspect of the genome project's potential effects is its impact on world agriculture. The Human Genome Project will provide source information (...)
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  12. Hgp : The Holy Genome Project? An Answer To The Questionnaire Concerning The Unesco Declaration On Protection Of The Human Genome.Alex Mauron - 1995 - Eubios Journal of Asian and International Bioethics 5 (5):117-119.
     
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  13.  15
    Bioethical Implications of Globalization: An International Consortium Project of the European Commission.Thomas E. Novotny, Emilio Mordini, Ruth Chadwick, J. Martin Pedersen, Fabrizio Fabbri, Reidar K. Lie, Natapong Thanachaiboot, Elias Mossialos & Govin Permanand - 2006 - PLoS Med 3 (2):e43.
    The term “globalization” was popularized by Marshall McLuhan in War and Peace in the Global Village. In the book, McLuhan described how the global media shaped current events surrounding the Vietnam War [1] and also predicted how modern information and communication technologies would accelerate world progress through trade and knowledge development. Globalization now refers to a broad range of issues regarding the movement of goods and services through trade liberalization, and the movement of people through migration. Much has also been (...)
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  14. Justice and the Human Genome Project.Timothy F. Murphy & Marc A. Lappé (eds.) - 1994 - University of California Press.
    The Human Genome Project is an expensive, ambitious, and controversial attempt to locate and map every one of the approximately 100,000 genes in the human body. If it works, and we are able, for instance, to identify markers for genetic diseases long before they develop, who will have the right to obtain such information? What will be the consequences for health care, health insurance, employability, and research priorities? And, more broadly, how will attitudes toward human (...)
     
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  15.  17
    Subversive Reflections on the Human Genome Project.Alex Rosenberg - 1994 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1994:329 - 335.
    By developing an elaborate allegory, this paper attempts to show that the advertised aim of the Human Genome project, to sequence the entire 3 billion base pair primary sequence of the nucleic acid molecules that constitute the human genome, does not make scientific sense. This raises the questions of what the real aim of the project could be, and why the molecular biological community has chosen to offer the primary sequence as the objective to (...)
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  16. Women and Special Vulnerability: Commentary "On the Principle of Respect for Human Vulnerability and Personal Integrity," UNESCO, International Bioethics Committee Report.Mary C. Rawlinson - 2012 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 5 (2):174-179.
    In the past decade UNESCO has pursued a leadership role in the articulation of general principles for bioethics, as well as an extensive campaign to promulgate these principles globally.1 Since UNESCO's General Conference adopted the Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights in 2005, UNESCO's Bioethics Section has worked with member states to develop a "bioethics infrastructure." UNESCO also provides an "Ethics Teacher Training Course" to member states and disseminates a "core curriculum," primarily targeting medical students. The core curriculum (...)
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  17.  24
    Who's Afraid of the Human Genome Project?Philip Kitcher - 1994 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1994:313-321.
    There are a number of controversies surrounding the Human Genome Project. Some criticisms are based on the contention that the full human sequence will be scientifically worthless; others stem from short-term worries about the social impact of genetic testing and the release of genetic information about individuals. I argue that, properly understood, the HGP is a valuable scientific project with a misleading name, that the moral issues surrounding the short-term difficulties are relatively straightforward but that (...)
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  18.  34
    Privacy and the Human Genome Project.David L. Wiesenthal & Neil I. Wiener - 1996 - Ethics and Behavior 6 (3):189 – 202.
    The Human Genome Project has raised many issues regarding the contributions of genetics to a variety of diseases and societal conditions. With genetic testing now easily conducted with lowered costs in nonmedical domains, a variety of privacy issues must be considered. Such testing will result in the loss of significant privacy rights for the individual. Society must now consider such issues as the ownership of genetic data, confidentiality rights to such information, limits placed on genetic screening, and (...)
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  19.  7
    The Human Genome Project and the Right to Intellectual Property.Ascensión Cambrón - 2000 - Global Bioethics 13 (3-4):53-66.
    This work examines the scientific and social objectives of the Human Genome Project. Scientific ones are “to map the human genome” while social ones are “to improve the human health and welfare”. Ten years after this project has begun, their scientific aims are fullfilled, but their social ones are still pending. The reason for that is that both scientists and policy makers have forgotten something: the current configuration for the right to intellectual property—patents (...)
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  20.  35
    Self-Critical Federal Science? The Ethics Experiment Within the U.S. Human Genome Project: ERIC T. JUENGST.Eric T. Juengst - 1996 - Social Philosophy and Policy 13 (2):63-95.
    On October 1, 1988, thirty-five years after co-discovering the structure of the DNA molecule, Dr. James Watson launched an unprecedented experiment in American science policy. In response to a reporter's question at a press conference, he unilaterally set aside 3 to 5 percent of the budget of the newly launched Human Genome Project to support studies of the ethical, legal, and social implications of new advances in human genetics. The Human Genome Project, by (...)
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  21.  33
    The Human Genome Project and the Social Contract: A Law Policy Approach.Christian Byk - 1992 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 17 (4):371-380.
    For the first time in history, genetics will enable science to completely identify each human as genetically unique. Will this knowledge reinforce the trend for more individual liberties or will it create a ‘brave new world’? A law policy approach to the problems raised by the human genome project shows how far our democratic institutions are from being the proper forum to discuss such issues. Because of the fears and anxiety raised in the population, and also (...)
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  22.  15
    Global Leadership and International Regime: Empirical Testing of Cooperation Without Hegemony Paradigm on the Basis of 120 Multilateral Conventions Data Deposited to the United Nations System.Lien Thi Quynh Le, Yoshiki Mikami & Takashi Inoguchi - 2014 - Japanese Journal of Political Science 15 (4):523-601.
    This study is an attempt to construct a quantitative link for international regimes with global leadership. The country's willingness to lead in solving global issues as the first mover in the formation of an international regime is measured and characterized by analyzing their ratification behavior in multilateral conventions deposited to the United Nations which shape of the global community. For this purpose, a set of quantitative indicators, the Index of Global Leadership Willingness and the Global Support Index, was (...)
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  23.  8
    Ethical Considerations of Research Policy for Personal Genome Analysis: The Approach of the Genome Science Project in Japan.Kazuto Kato, Tetsuya Shirai & Jusaku Minari - 2014 - Life Sciences, Society and Policy 10 (1):1-11.
    As evidenced by high-throughput sequencers, genomic technologies have recently undergone radical advances. These technologies enable comprehensive sequencing of personal genomes considerably more efficiently and less expensively than heretofore. These developments present a challenge to the conventional framework of biomedical ethics; under these changing circumstances, each research project has to develop a pragmatic research policy. Based on the experience with a new large-scale project—the Genome Science Project—this article presents a novel approach to conducting a specific policy for (...)
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  24.  37
    Key Points for Developing an International Declaration on Nursing, Human Rights, Human Genetics and Public Health Policy.G. Anderson & M. V. Rorty - 2001 - Nursing Ethics 8 (3):259-271.
    Human rights legislation pertaining to applications of human genetic science is still lacking at an international level. Three international human rights documents now serve as guidelines for countries wishing to develop such legislation. These were drafted and adopted by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, the Human Genome Organization, and the Council of Europe. It is critically important that the international nursing community makes known its philosophy and practice-based knowledge relating (...)
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  25.  27
    Discussing Hugo: The German Debate on the Ethical Implications of the Human Genome Project.Susanne Boshammer, Matthias Kayss, Christa Runtenberg & Johann S. Ach - 1998 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 23 (3):324 – 333.
    The current German criticism of HUGO centers around the term ‘human dignity’; consenquentialist and autonomy-based arguments are used. The debate culminates in questioning the integrity of bioethics as a scholarly discipline and has created a heterogeneous coalition of disparate political and social groups that oppose any research that would facilitate genetic pre-selection of human characteristics.
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  26.  8
    Children in Distress: A Global Perspective—Report on a Workshop Organized for the IUAES Intercongress on “Biodemography and Human Evolution” Held at the Istituto Degli Innocenti in Florence, April 21–22, 1995. [REVIEW]C. S. Blanc - 2002 - Global Bioethics 15 (4):31-50.
    The two-day workshop Children in distress: a global perspective, explored the physical, epidemiological and social dimension of the environment of children and their caretakers at home and in school, in both rural and urban settings. Through active dialogue the participants weighted the problems in the regions and countries of the world they represented, from their multiple disciplinary perspectives. They identified in the process some common trends and distinct emphases.
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    Improving the Quality of Host Country Ethical Oversight of International Research: The Use of a Collaborative ‘Pre‐Review’ Mechanism for a Study of Fexinidazole for Human African Trypanosomiasis.Carl H. Coleman, Chantal Ardiot, Séverine Blesson, Yves Bonnin, Francois Bompart, Pierre Colonna, Ames Dhai, Julius Ecuru, Andrew Edielu, Christian Hervé, François Hirsch, Bocar Kouyaté, Marie‐France Mamzer‐Bruneel, Dionko Maoundé, Eric Martinent, Honoré Ntsiba, Gérard Pelé, Gilles Quéva, Marie‐Christine Reinmund, Samba Cor Sarr, Abdoulaye Sepou, Antoine Tarral, Djetodjide Tetimian, Olaf Valverde, Simon Van Nieuwenhove & Nathalie Strub‐Wourgaft - 2015 - Developing World Bioethics 15 (3):241-247.
    Developing countries face numerous barriers to conducting effective and efficient ethics reviews of international collaborative research. In addition to potentially overlooking important scientific and ethical considerations, inadequate or insufficiently trained ethics committees may insist on unwarranted changes to protocols that can impair a study's scientific or ethical validity. Moreover, poorly functioning review systems can impose substantial delays on the commencement of research, which needlessly undermine the development of new interventions for urgent medical needs. In response to these concerns, the (...)
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  28.  51
    Research on the Human Genome and Patentability--The Ethical Consequences.A. Pompidou - 1995 - Journal of Medical Ethics 21 (2):69-71.
    The genome is one of the primordial elements of the human being and is responsible for human identity and its transmission to descendants. The gene as such ought not be appropriated or owned by man. However, any sufficiently complete description of a gene should be capable of being protected as intellectual property. Furthermore, all utilisations of a gene or its elements that permit development of processes or new products should be patentable. Ethics, in the sense of moral (...)
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  29.  22
    Sloan, Phillip R., Ed. Controlling Our Destinies: Historical, Philosophical, Ethical, and Theological Perspectives on the Human Genome Project.Richard Benson - 2002 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 2 (4):769-771.
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  30.  9
    Controlling Our Destinies: Historical, Philosophical, Ethical, and Theological Perspectives on the Human Genome Project by Phillip R. Sloan. [REVIEW]Dorothy Nelkin - 2000 - Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 91:830-831.
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  31.  8
    The Human Genome Project: What Questions Does It Raise for Theology and Ethics?Ted F. Peters & Robert J. Russell - 1991 - Midwest Medical Ethics: A Publication of the Midwest Bioethics Center 8 (1):12-17.
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  32.  3
    Evolution of Sameness and Difference: Perspectives on the Human Genome Project[REVIEW]Phillip Sloan - 2003 - Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 94:413-414.
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  33. Evolution of Sameness and Difference: Perspectives on the Human Genome Project. By Stanley Shostak.R. N. Leamnson - 2002 - The European Legacy 7 (2):248-249.
     
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  34. If This is the Book of Life, We Should Not Settle for a Rough Draft Over the Long Term but Should Remain Committed to Producing a Final, Highly Accurate Version.—Francis S. Collins," Shattuck Lecture: Medical and Societal Consequences of the Human Genome Project" So This Book... Maps its Particular Investigations Along the Double Helix of a Work's Reception History and its Production History. But the Work of Knowing Demands That the Map Be Followed Into the Textual Field. [REVIEW]Jerome J. McGann - 2006 - In Lennard J. Davis (ed.), The Disability Studies Reader. Psychology Press. pp. 67.
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  35.  31
    Commentary on the Unesco Ibc Report on Respect for Vulnerability and Personal Integrity: (Article 8 of the Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights). Evans - 2012 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 5 (2):170-173.
    As a member of the UNESCO International Bioethics Committee (IBC) in 2005, I was privileged to serve on the small drafting group of the Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights, which was expertly chaired by the Australian Justice Michael Kirby. That draft matured over two years and was adopted by acclamation at the General Assembly of UNESCO in 2005. The project was conceived out of dissatisfaction with the generally perceived preoccupation of bioethics with the professional clinical (...)
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  36. Exploring Human-Animal Relationships. The 14th Annual Conference of the International Society for Anthrozoology On July 11 and 12, 2005 the International Society for Anthrozoology (ISAZ) Held its 14th Annual Conference in Niagara Falls, New York. ISAZ is a Nonprofit, Nonpolitical. [REVIEW]Margaret Schneider - 2005 - Society and Animals 13 (4).
  37.  3
    Studies on Indian Medical History: Papers Presented at the International Workshop on the Study of Indian Medicine Held at the Wellcome Institute for the History of Medicine, 2-4 September, 1985. [REVIEW]Francis Zimmermann, G. Jan Meulenbeld & Dominik Wujastyk - 1994 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 114 (3):478.
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  38.  14
    Controlling Our Destinies: Historical, Philosophical, Ethical, and Theological Perspectives on the Human Genome Project. Phillip R. Sloan.Dorothy Nelkin - 2000 - Isis 91 (4):830-831.
  39.  5
    Stanley Shostak. Evolution of Sameness and Difference: Perspectives on the Human Genome Project. Xiv + 342 Pp., Tables, Bibl., Index. Amsterdam: Harwood Academic Publishers, 1999. [REVIEW]Phillip R. Sloan - 2003 - Isis 94 (2):413-414.
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    Race and the Human GenomePlain Talk About the Human Genome Project: A Tuskegee University Conference on Its Promise and Perils... And Matters of Race.Erwin Fleissner, Edward Smith & Walter Sapp - 1999 - Hastings Center Report 29 (4):40.
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    Plain Talk About the Human Genome Project: A Tuskegee University Conference on its Promise and Perils and Matters of Race Edited by Edward Smith and Walter Sapp.James E. Bowman - 1999 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 42 (3):453-454.
  42. Alienation and Wholeness: Spinoza, Hans Jonas, and the Human Genome Project on the Push and Shove of Mortal Being.Wendy C. Hamblet - 2006 - Analecta Husserliana 91:57-65.
     
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  43.  25
    International Business, Human Rights, and Moral Complicity: A Call for a Declaration on the Universal Rights and Duties of Business.W. Michael Hoffman & Robert E. Mcnulty - 2009 - Business and Society Review 114 (4):541-570.
  44.  12
    Mapping the Human Genome: Some Thoughts for Those Who Say'there Should Be a Law on It'.Loane Skene - 1991 - Bioethics 5 (3):233–249.
  45.  49
    Why We Need Needs-Based Justifications of Human RightsCharles R. Beitz,The Idea of Human Rights(Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009), 256 Pp., £16.99/$29.95 Cloth.James Griffin,On Human Rights(Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008), 360 Pp., £17.99/$29.95 Paper.Beth A. Simmons,Mobilizing for Human Rights: International Law in Domestic Politics(Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009), 468 Pp., £20.99/$29.99 Paper. [REVIEW]Rita Floyd - 2011 - Journal of International Political Theory 7 (1):103-115.
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    Mapping the Human Genome: Some Thoughts for Those Who Say‘There Should Be a Law on It’.Loane Skene - 1991 - Bioethics 5 (3):233-249.
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  47.  2
    The Elsi Program of the Us-American Human Genome Project-New Perspectives for Medical Ethics?Nikola Biller-Andorno - 2001 - Ethik in der Medizin 13 (4).
  48. General Symposium on Uram Research, Definition and Methodology an Approach and its Critique, Held During the 4th Biennial Meeting of the International-Society-for-the-Study-of-Human-Ideas-on-Uram 1987-a Report. [REVIEW]Dj Leigh - 1988 - Ultimate Reality and Meaning 11 (2):130-150.
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  49. Critical Presentation of a Proposal for a Unity of Knowledge (Integrated Studies) Program in University-College, University-of-Toronto, Toronto, Canada, General Symposium Held During the 4th Biennial Meeting of the International-Society-for-the-Study-of-Human-Ideas-on-Uram 1987-a Report. [REVIEW]Pf Morgan - 1988 - Ultimate Reality and Meaning 11 (2):122-130.
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  50. General Symposium on What is of Ultimate Importance Held During the 4th Biennial Meeting of the International-Society-for-the-Study-of-Human-Ideas-on-Uram, 1987, a Report. [REVIEW]A. Tough - 1989 - Ultimate Reality and Meaning 12 (3):229-236.
     
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